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How Did You Start Skiing? - Page 2

Poll Results: How did you start skiing

 
  • 22% (13)
    Parent taught you.
  • 39% (23)
    Ski School.
  • 6% (4)
    Taught by a friend.
  • 1% (1)
    A significant other.
  • 20% (12)
    Self taught first day.
  • 8% (5)
    Taught by aliens.
58 Total Votes  
post #31 of 57

I guess I'm the first person to vote that they were taken skiing by a significant other.

 

Significant Other wanted me to be a skier, so he bought me a pair of boots (ski shop fitted me with boots 3 sizes too big) and paid for me to take a lesson. After paying, he was told that the resort wasn't going to be teaching anymore lessons that day, so he took me to the rope tow with the 5 year olds. I did so well on the rope tow, that we went to lift.

 

The bar connecting the chair to lift was mounted forward of the chair and when our chair came, I was hit hard on the back of the head with a steel bar and I fell into the chair and saw stars. Since it was the bunny slope, it didn't take long to get to the top where I received 2 seconds of instruction on how to get off a chair. Needless to say, I fell. I finally got back up (pulled to my feet) and started down. Significant Other went in front and there was only me and one other person on the slope. That other person (kid) ran over the back of my skis and sent me sliding down the run. My leg was twisting painfully and since those boots were too big, the bindings weren't going to release for love or money. Fortunately I stopped sliding before any serious damage happened and I then walked down & went back to the rope tow. I went a few more times with Significan Other and friends and it was always brutal.

 

I married the Significant Other and years later we went to a local place with our kid's school. I didn't have to walk miles from the parking lot, the slopes were small and easy, and I could easily get a drink of water of food whenever I wanted it because the lodge was right there at the bottom of every run and they actually had insturctors available to give the lessons that they sold!  I found out that skiing was actually suppose to be fun & I've been skiing ever since.

post #32 of 57

I started to get some exercise and relieve the boredom in the evenings while working 2 and 1/2 months in Dubai in summer a while ago while I was 30 something. 45+ degrees outside. Took lessons because you had to know how to stop (although some of the local kids ignored this and caused me to crash and crack my ribs.) with a very patient Hungarian lady. It has evolved to take over from climbing as the must do recreation, and if construction here keeps going the way it is I will shortly be using my beginning ski Instructing qualification to teach beginning skiers beginning skiing techniques, and hoping they like it as much as I do. We never went to the mountain skiing as kids as Dad didn't like it. I really wanted to though, and it was only 3-4 hours away. For the last wee while I have driven 7 hours each way to weekends away skiing, Mad.

post #33 of 57

Taught by my dad when I was about 4 or 5 at Schweitzer (1968 or '69).  Started off on the rope tow, moved to what was then "Baby bear" later in the day and by the end of the day rode "Grandpa Bear", Chair 1, to the top.  Basic instruction was to point the curly tips downhill!

 

I was hooked.  Skied up there for my first couple of years and then we started going elsewhere when Schweitzer raised their adult ticket prices to $10.  Have never had a lesson (probably should to figure these wider skis out).  Learned from skiing with friends, competed in moguls while in Junior High then started on the ski patrol in High School.

 

Have now started my daughter skiing but realize that I have no idea what it is like to learn to ski so she is learning from instructors.
 

post #34 of 57



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cayuse View Post

Taught by my dad when I was about 4 or 5 at Schweitzer (1968 or '69).  Started off on the rope tow, moved to what was then "Baby bear" later in the day and by the end of the day rode "Grandpa Bear", Chair 1, to the top.  Basic instruction was to point the curly tips downhill!

 

I was hooked.  Skied up there for my first couple of years and then we started going elsewhere when Schweitzer raised their adult ticket prices to $10.  Have never had a lesson (probably should to figure these wider skis out).  Learned from skiing with friends, competed in moguls while in Junior High then started on the ski patrol in High School.

 

Have now started my daughter skiing but realize that I have no idea what it is like to learn to ski so she is learning from instructors.
 


 Cayuse, ever go Cat Skiing at Schweitzer, just curious, thought about trying this winter.
 

post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post



 


 Cayuse, ever go Cat Skiing at Schweitzer, just curious, thought about trying this winter.
 


Nope but might be interested.  A few friends went last season, need to ask them how it was.

 

Now back to your regularly scheduled thread...

post #36 of 57

I learned aged about 13 in the upstairs of Ellis Brigham's ski shop in Liverpool. The slope was 10 metres long and made of Snowmat (a plastic bristle matting) Above about half way you had to duck to avoid banging your head on the ceiling and if you couldn't stop you ran the risk of going through the door and down the stairs into the shop.

 

It didn't put me off though and while it was another 9 years before I ever skied on snow I remain obsessed and improving at 53.

 

I later taught all 3 of my kids. My son's first formal ski school lesson was one he taught in Mount Washington BC as the Instructor.

post #37 of 57

Self taught hiking for turns in back yards and farm hills on home rigged garage sale gear with friends using hockey skills as main technique/influence.

After two or three years of that I finally got to ski at a lift served resort.  I took a week of all day lessons over Christmas break one year.  Occasional lessons school ski clubs, and yet more back country hiking when I couldn't get a ride to the ski area and I finally ended up on the local bump's ski team with a pass in high school.

post #38 of 57

I'm 46 now, I think I was 27 working in sales, my boss at the time says to me one day, "we're taking some clients to beaver creek to go skiing, I need you to go, do you ski?" "no", "OK, go get some lessons, we leave in two weeks"  I got a lesson at Craigmier in NJ about 50 yards of terror with about of 10' vert!..   I had on my boss's borrowed Bogner jacket and pants with my Lange front entries....   TOTAL gaper poser..

 

Went to Beaver Creek, got instantly hooked. Took an all day group lesson with some clients, fell at the end of the day and got skiers thumb. had surgery.. end of 1st season....

 

After that, I skied a handful of days per season and took lessons, for a few seasons I skied up at beaver Creeks Technique week and had some very good instructors (I met one skiing with Rick in April) Got involved in the HH cult and then woke up.  I have to thank Phil for that, skiing one day with him, he just said, you should be smiling when you ski, don't worry so much, relax and enjoy. So I did, thanks!

 

I didn't start skiing off-piste until 4 seasons ago, never skied a bump, trees or powder really.  I love to see you all getting your kids involved, it's something I really wish I was able to do as a kid.

post #39 of 57

aliens.....then years later some epic ski academy , the name of which escapes me, :)....i think my memory problems relate back to the aliens.

post #40 of 57

My first day was when I was 5 years old at Tenney Mountain. I took a first day lesson in the morning, then went skiing with my sister and my brother in law in the afternoon. Both my sister and brother in law were instructors at Wachusett for a few years. From that point on, my only instruction for 18 years was my brother in law. As I said, he had been an instructor for a time, and he had learned to ski from his Austrian father. So the instruction wasn't too shabby. My next formal lesson, from an instructor actually employed as such, was my hiring clinic at Okemo when I became a full time instructor. From there, tons of in house clinics, PSIA clinics and L1 exam, and skiing day in day out with L2 and L3 instructors.

post #41 of 57

Montana State University ski class at Bridger Bowl.  They had it as a PE credit.  It cost under $100 bucks for 10 weeks of classes and lift tickets.  Of course this was 1973.

post #42 of 57

     I was 3 months old (rather 3 months after i was conceived) when i first began skiing.  My mother went on a trip to Stowe with some other patrolers and had no choice but to bring me along. Can't say i remember much of it though. I must say that i was very fortunate to learn as such an early age.  My first time actually skiing i was 3 and guiding my mother down the hill with a rope.  I was off the leash by my second season (4y.o.) while my brother began to learn.  I never really had a formal lesson.  I learned by trial and error skiing with my mom, brother and eventually friends.  I introduced my significant other to skiing this past season.  As much as i wanted to give her instruction i knew it would be pointless.  She doesn't listen to me at home, so to think she would on top of a mountain?  She took a few lessons from a wonderful instructor and is now hooked as much as i am... or close anyway. 

post #43 of 57

UnkaJB, welcome and great 1st post.

 

post #44 of 57

How did I learn to ski?  Not the same question as "when were you first on skis?"

 

I was first strapped onto skis in 1962 at Garmish, Austria.  US Military playground there, likely place for many first timers who came home to start up many a new ski area once their tour in Postwar Germany was over.  I was 3 years old, and don't remember a thing.  However, 8mm home movies exist to document the event.  At least I wasn't screaming my head off like my older sister.

 

Luckily, my dad bought the 2 sets of skis, rather than rent, so we had them available as we grew up.  After 4 years in Phoenix, we moved to Kansas, where we had a hill right off the back yard.  No turns involved, and if you made it down the hill still upright, you had to stop before you went in a deep ditch.  My stopping technique hasn't changed much over the years - just fall down.  The bear trap bindings never seemed to lock down tight on my snow boots, so it was a very tenuous connection between skier and ski.

 

Fast forward to 1973, when we moved to Boise, Idaho.  A day at Bogus Basin with some more modern rental equipment established to me that turns with skis were actually possible.  I was signed up for lessons immediately.  The rest is history (obscure history).

post #45 of 57

My father and mother used to take me ice skating at Grossinger's Hotel on the exact same rink where the ABC's Wild World of Sports filmed an event called "Barrel Jumping."    One day, when I was 7, Dad asked if I wanted to go skiing there.  I never went ice skating again.

 

The "Ski Valley" consisted of a 40 yard rope tow and a 150 yard T-bar that ended at the spot where a badly hooked golf ball off the third hole of the old Grossinger golf course would land.  The head ski instructor was Tony Kastner, who was purportedly doing Kim Novak and a bunch of other hot babes at the time.  He was my hero because he escaped the Nazi's by jumping out of a train and was a Hungarian Freedom Fighter.  I think my dad liked him because he was shtupping a lot of hot babes.

 

Grossinger's was an unusual place to learn how to ski.  They had the first snow-making in the US.  They rented leather boots with crappy laces and the edges used to tear away from some of the old wooden skis.  The locals had to wait in line because of all the tourists from NYC.  The rope on the rope tow was more abrasive than sand paper, ripping the hell out of my woolen gloves.  Oddly, they closed for lunch.  Really.  The Grossinger family didn't like people going hungry.  Several fine racers and skiers came from there.  The son of one of them landed on the USST and ended up an Olympian. 

  A

All that is left functioning of that formerly great hotel is the golf course.  There are a lot of good memories there, but the families that created them are mostly buried in the local cemetery within a stone's throw of my father and mother.

 

 

Photo below of Tony Kastner and Kim Novak at Grossinger's:

 

 50346050.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=E41C9FE5C4AA0A1465822B4509DA1CC899A4C26403CBC0BCDEB115AEF2423F89B01E70F2B3269972

 Kim Novak and Tony Kastner


Edited by quant2325 - 3/2/11 at 10:18pm
post #46 of 57

Hmmm...why do I have this funny feeling that Kim didn't have to pay for her lessons??

post #47 of 57
Thread Starter 



More taught by aliens than friends, hmm.  We are a slightly warped crowd, aren't we?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brownie_bear View Post

Montana State University ski class at Bridger Bowl.  They had it as a PE credit.  It cost under $100 bucks for 10 weeks of classes and lift tickets.  Of course this was 1973.


Took that same MSU course a few years earlier, but not in a recommended manor.  Was a young level 2, teaching part time at Bridger that winter and going to school; decided to take the course (alcohol was probably involved in this process).  Borrowed a room mates gear wore jeans and really pissed off the 1st year instructor.  Did exactly what he asked to an extreme.  The last day they set a slalom for a final; the kid told me, "just ski your best".  Must do what instructor says so I beat him, he flunked me, he did not see the humor.

 

4 years later ran a collage program through our ski school so I signed up and did much better.  I gave myself an A  .
 

post #48 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post




Or maybe they forgot about that significant other.
 


I could have voted for SO, but I voted taught by Aliens, because after looking back, that's what it seems like now.

 

Seriously, (or not so much) the first experience on skis was soooooooo nutz, I'm surprised I stuck with it.  I guess the lure of skiing was just too much for a miserable first time out to squash.

 

post #49 of 57

I took a gal named Sandy skiing at her request.  Bell Mountain (all 192 feet of it), south of Lambertville New Jersey.  She sat and got angry when I really wanted to ski.  I learned to do a huge sweeping turn to the left on the bunny rope that day.  A few days later it hit me that I never did a turn to the right so I had to go back and started learning to turn right.  After that, with no money, I just watched instructors ... some were nice and some would gesture for me to move on.

 

Sandy?  All she wanted to do was sit and look good on a hay bale.  She walked back down.  But, she didn't do too badly,  When she dumped me a few weeks later she took up with a guitar player and ended up hanging with George Harrison at his house.  The band never got anywhere (cut an album), Brother on Apple. 

 

It was the second year I started taking lessons.  Phil Pug grew up there ... Timber Hill PA ... he knew my first instructors ... Ernie Mulbauer and Toni (German) .. That was "Natur Technique".

 

It was .... get this price ... $5 for lift, lesson and lunch.  Needless to say we took full advantage of that.

 

Ernie's comment .... "Now you start working for me so I don't have to keep feeding you! " 
 

post #50 of 57

In 1961 at age 13 on a school trip to Quebec City we took a side trip to Mount St. Anne. It was Spring and the beginner slope was closed so it was leather lace up boots on the intermediate slope. I never made it down once without falling and twisted both my ankles--didn't know which leg to limp on. I loved the fact that here was a sport that you could be totally inept at and yet have the time of your life. Years later I learned that my parents met at Mount St. Anne, so i claim that I come by my passion for skiing legitimately.

 

I never got to ski again until I was 16 and they opened up a ski hill at Chedoke Golf Course at the base of the Niagara Escarpment in Hamilton, Ontario--300 vertical feet. My dad showed me how to do a Stem Christe turn so I never really learned to snow plow. Mid week student night skiing was 50 cents and they never checked lift tickets so I skied all season for 50 cents. And you could take a city bus to the slopes.

 

I had a regular group of high school ski buddies and we took turns once or twice a month borrowing the parent's car to go to Blue Mountain in Collingwood, Ontario or Holiday Valley, Ellicotville, N.Y. It was at Holiday Valley that I took my first group ski lesson from Stein Erikson--- along with about 300 other skiers during the annual Stein Erikson Day at the resort. I will never forget Stein saying to the crowd in a heavy European accent, "You think you know how to parallel but you don't. It was great, I loved it!

post #51 of 57

It was Christmas break 1956 and our family drove the autobahn from Wiesbaden to Berchtesgaden in the German Alps.  Armed Forces Special Services provided us wood skis, leather boots, and bamboo poles.  The small ski area was called Rossfeld and I recall our instructor telling my aunt, "You fall so hard down"!

 

I fell in love with the sport but gave it up in 1962.  I moved to Florida and became a competitive sky diver eventually retiring from that sport after 2000+ jumps..  I resumed skiing and took up snowboarding the winter of 1996-97 and today I live for winter!

post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by KOB View Post

I guess I'm the first person to vote that they were taken skiing by a significant other.

 

[...]


Ok, this post brings back memories.  As a rookie instructor, I'm taking out a group of 'never-evers'.  As I go through my routine spiel, asking about their prior skiing experiences (which should have been none at this point), one mid-30 lady says that she did ski once with her hubby before.  He took her to the top of chair 9, a high speed quad, with all runs rated black, except for one blue, through a nasty and very busy terrain park.

 

She woke up in the local hospital.

 

As a rookie instructor, I was near rigor mortis, expecting an absolute nightmare of a class (this was a group class).  To my astonishment, she was the most adventurous of the group, being at or near the top in all drills, and in the end we ventured into terrain I almost never go to with the beginners.  This was one of the most rewarding classes I've ever thought.  One of those days when you fell, you've created a new skier for life.

post #53 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virtus_Probi View Post

Hmmm...why do I have this funny feeling that Kim didn't have to pay for her lessons??


Might have been a non-cash transaction.

post #54 of 57

If you are from the NY Metro area, Grossingers was the epitome of the Borscht Belt also known as The Jewish Alps.  If you look at what we define as comedy, most can be traced back to Grossingers.

 

Genny Grossinger's picture graced the table of virtually every household withing 200 miles of NYC, with "Genny Grossingers Rye Bread".

post #55 of 57

We had been married a couple of years and hubby told me he had always wanted to go skiing.  So we went to a local bump and looked at it.  Him - "that looks exciting"!  me - "that looks slippery and cold and I could break something"!  So we took up bridge, and after one too many arguments over why I bid or played my hand wrong, we decided to try skiing as a winter sport.  A friend who had skied a couple of times took us.  My boots didn't fit, my skis were too long, and everyone in my beginner leasson (but me!) had skied before.  I never even used the lift ticket I had paid for!  That was the end of my skiing for that season, but hubby went several more times with his friends.

 

Not wanting to become a "ski widow", I took lessons the following season and struggled to find boots that fit.  The following year we took a "ski week" at Gray Rocks, and then came west for the first time.  One run at Vail and we were both hooked for life.           

post #56 of 57

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cayuse View Post

Taught by my dad when I was about 4 or 5 at Schweitzer (1968 or '69).  Started off on the rope tow, moved to what was then "Baby bear" later in the day and by the end of the day rode "Grandpa Bear", Chair 1, to the top.  Basic instruction was to point the curly tips downhill!

 

I was hooked.  Skied up there for my first couple of years and then we started going elsewhere when Schweitzer raised their adult ticket prices to $10.  Have never had a lesson (probably should to figure these wider skis out).  Learned from skiing with friends, competed in moguls while in Junior High then started on the ski patrol in High School.

 

Have now started my daughter skiing but realize that I have no idea what it is like to learn to ski so she is learning from instructors.
 

 

I was taught by my dad up when I was 4 or 5, at Schweitzer too (fast forward 20 years from your experience). Then he threw me into the "Mogul Mice" for a few seasons.
 


Edited by spknmike - 8/12/10 at 12:38pm
post #57 of 57

I first went skiing when I was about 3 years old, in Wengen, Switzerland.  I think my very first time on skis was using some of those that you strapped on over your snow boots :-).  Since then I've skiied every season except one.

 

I wanted to be a ski instructor from the age of about 8 or 9.

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