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I'm thinking of introducing my 19-month old daughter to snow/ski

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
And I am thinking about getting her skis. She's 74 cm tall, so it looks like a 70 cm might work (there's nothing shorter). But next year, will that be too short? I know that my 3 year old started with a 90 cm ski, so I'm worried about how long that 70 cm will be fine for her.

At the same time, I can't find any used pair of skis at this time of the season, so maybe it'll be next year

YA
post #2 of 15
As Ryan would say, "doooood, you came to the right place."

As for skis here is the place for cheap used kids gear:

http://www.skitrucks.com/kids_pkgs.html

If you buy from these guys make sure you demand the skis be at least run over the tuning belt a few times before they are shipped (the skis are used rental gear and the bases look like it).

Phone the owner and talk to him in detail about your childs height, weight, shoe size, etc. Then ask what he can do for you. Remember really little kids only need straight skis since they dont carve just wedge.

As for training materials and gear here is the best site on the web:

http://www.applerise.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=ARS&Category_Co de=1400-AIDS

Scroll down and be sure to click on the what is kid-ski button for more information.

We started our daughter at age 2 and she loves skiing. Good luck!!!

Mark
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks Maddog. I don't think I'll buy any of the aids, none of my kids used them (though they started later, at 4 and 3). But I'll look at the ski site.

YA
post #4 of 15
At 19 months old, the best introduction to skiing would be through cross-country skiing:

-the terrain is more level, the slight variations of slope on a XC trail is more than enough at this age;
-the kid's heel is not attached - more like walking;
-it is easier to get the kid up;
-the kids have the poles to hold on to;
-no lifts to fall off from;
-you can rent a one-man sleigh and pull it behind you like a horse (they come with a hip harness). Then after the kid gets tired of "skiing" (40 minutes?), she will go for a two hour nap in the sled (if you get some warm blankets) while you are working out (pulling the sled) .

We did it with our then-20-month-old 2 years ago (against my objections, I must add : ). Now she is comfortable on both XC and alpine skis. And as an added benefit, she's been turning on parallel skis from day one: it's the only way to turn on XC skis, when both feet are in the track [img]tongue.gif[/img]

Now that she is 4, and her sister 15, we always have at least one day on XC skis each vacation.

Re. DH skis - 70 or 80 shoulnd't matter, as long as they are soft. Next year, she will likely need the 80s.

PLEASE get a KiddieLift harness and perhaps a leash. The harness helps a lot in getting her on and off the lift without dislocating her elbows. The leash will keep her always near - and it helps turning too. AND it is a huge help in propelling the kid across level or uphill terrain. You will forget about sore back, and the kids love to play a horsie or a steam engine that could at this age. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

The reason kids' instructors don't use it is it takes a doubly-private lesson: one instructor goes in fornt and shows what to do, while the other holds the leash behind the kid while guiding the kid's hips into the turn by pulling on the leash.

[ January 22, 2004, 03:42 PM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #5 of 15
I second the leash as a requirement. It saved my back big time. But you can buy leashes at any good ski shop. One other thing you might buy is the tip wedgie. My daughter didn't need it but it was cheap and if she didn't have good control it would have been a gawd send (I think it cost about $5). While I do not have the lift harness it looks like something I would like a lot. Hoisting the kids onto the lift, especially the old fixed grip lifts is not much fun. Anything that makes it easier is greatly appreciated.

Mark
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am not planning on getting her on a lift this year. And anyways I have exhausted my list of shops to get skis from (haven't called that ski truck place yet), so I may just wait until next year

Ski truck lists "2-way" and "5-way" bindings. Are they talking about how many ways they release? 5-way would be safer then, right? ($99 for a package coming from a rental place is pretty expensive, actually).

YA
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by Ladede:
I am not planning on getting her on a lift this year. And anyways I have exhausted my list of shops to get skis from (haven't called that ski truck place yet), so I may just wait until next year

Ski truck lists "2-way" and "5-way" bindings. Are they talking about how many ways they release? 5-way would be safer then, right? ($99 for a package coming from a rental place is pretty expensive, actually).

YA
I don't know where you are, but Okemo had some cute little plastic skis that would be perfect for a child that age. They strap on right to the boots they have. This would be enough just to get her walking around on them and feeling the slide a little in your back yard or at the bottom of a ski area where there isn't much traffic.

I agree that taking her up the lift is not right for this year, maybe even the beginning of next year, but the little skis and letting her walk around and play on them is a great idea. I bet other areas have tehm as well.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by Ladede:
($99 for a package coming from a rental place is pretty expensive, actually).

YA
For boots, skis, poles, and bindings? Yeah, thats it way too expensive. Sounds to me like you need to give up skiing altogether if thats too expensive. Sheeeee it, it costs more than half that for an adult to get a lift ticket around here.

Well you got me smiling!!!

Mark
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Maddog1959:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Ladede:
($99 for a package coming from a rental place is pretty expensive, actually).

YA
For boots, skis, poles, and bindings? Yeah, thats it way too expensive. Sounds to me like you need to give up skiing altogether if thats too expensive. Sheeeee it, it costs more than half that for an adult to get a lift ticket around here.

Well you got me smiling!!!

Mark
</font>[/quote]I'm glad I did. All I meant is that it usually cost around $80 for such a package in consignment (which means in a better shape most of the time(, and that relatively to that $99 is pretty expensive if the equipment has been seriously abused as you suggested. Now in the big scheme of things, you're definitely right. And no, I'm not giving up skiing [img]smile.gif[/img]

YA
post #10 of 15
I stared my kid at 19 months. I followed closely the recommendations in an article in the PSIA magazine from a couple years ago. If you are not an instructor, you probably don't have access to the article (unless you can find an instructor with the issue to copy it for you).

I started with the strap-on Kidz Skis. First I put them on inside and let him walk around on the carpet a lot. At 19months, I did not try to get my kid to ski downhill. I put a tip device (Try-Ski) on the skis and just towed him around flat by using a ski pole with the strap-end loop through the tip device. There's no need to rush going to downhill. Towing him/her around will to wonders toward learning balance without any need of a hill. Get yer kid used to playing on skis. Put the toys skis in his/her toybox. Play Warren Miller films on the DVD. Let him or her watch people having fun at the base of a ski area.

An important tip at this stage is always always always make sure the kid is having fun and that you stop the activity while the kid is still having fun. A lot of times, I'd take my kid out in the yard and we'd work on skis for not more than 15 minutes and he'd be done. Always, always take the skis off a little before you think he's tired of the activity so he/she wants to do it again.

It's one year later now and I have real skis for him, 70cm shaped Atomics. He is tall for his age and I still really think that these will be fine for at least the next two years Keep in mind that shaped skis ski longer.

This year, I'm still just towing him around the neighborhood to work on balance and milage. When I pass a spot that has a super gentle pitch, I let him to a 20' straight-run downhill, again, no need to rush to doing runs.

At the end of this season, I'll start working at my ski area on the magic carpet but no rush. He's got a lifetime to learn to ski.

-Ken
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi Ken,

I am looking into the strap-ons skis. It looks like the best thing to do. At first I wanted real edges but she won't need them on flats and true alpine boots just complicate the story for this year. I have no expectations that my daughter will ski downhill this year, but I'd like to familiarize her with snow and moving with skis on her feet, especially if I want to see if I can put her in ski school next year (the school starts with 3 year olds and she would be 2 1/2 so that may not work, though we'll see since I work there and they've seen her brothers ski).

So my plan is: easy play in the snow with her on such skis, and maybe listen to you leash guys so I can tow her. I don't cross-country, but I've got skins and Alpine Trekkers, and that could make for fun little tours.

Ken, is that article online? If not, do you know the issue number? I know instructors who could get it for me.

Thanks,
YA

[ January 23, 2004, 10:49 AM: Message edited by: Ladede ]
post #12 of 15
I took a look at the Ski Truck site and it made me a little concerned. Some of the bindings listed, such as the Geeze are indemnified. Some of the helmets are listed as used and scratched, and I think they are only designed for single impacts. Couple all of that together with their No Returns policy, and I think they are not a very reputable company. But that is just my two cents.

[ January 24, 2004, 04:51 AM: Message edited by: Ullr ]
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by Ullr:
I took a look at the Ski Truck site and it made me a little concerned. Some of the bindings listed, such as the Geeze are indemnified. Some of the helmets are listed as used and scratched, and I think they are only designed for single impacts. Couple all of that together with their No Returns policy, and I think they are not a very reputable company. But that is just my two cents.
Wow, $99 for a straight ski package? Why not go to Goodwill and pick one up for $10? Either way, the bindings aren't imdenified-sounds like a liability issue to me!
post #14 of 15
with a child that young, their bones and joints have not yet begun to form or harden. You don't want hard alpine boots or skis with edges. All you want to do at that age is get them used to moving and sliding. The other thing is your child's head will be proportionaly much larger than an adult or older child. With hard boots, they will most likely be levered against the back of the boot and pretty much doing every thing they can just to keep from falling over backwards. By putting them in soft street boots or shoes with the strap on skis they will be forced to stand up on their feet and move that way. Fight the urge to buy a boot or ski that they can "grow into" Every one that has to teach or work with your child will thank you. It's one of the biggest problems we have on the slopes. Children in equipment too large for them.
post #15 of 15
Basicly, Yes introduce them to snow and skis.

Don't push the time, they will probably go about 30-45 min at a time (on the long side) make sure they are leaving the snow wanting to come back and just enjoy the time and have fun.
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