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Bike fitting experience- Just like proper fit in boots! - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Thread Starter 



NICE, maybe I DO need a new bike......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post




I think you get a Specialized S Works Enduro. Slightly used, but in immaculate condition...

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post



NICE, maybe I DO need a new bike......


 


I'll take his Fuel.

post #33 of 46
Thread Starter 

not yet, we're in a recession ya' know. I really like my old ride....

post #34 of 46

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Um, I'm scratching my head here, I must not understand the OP correctly.

 

I thought you went to a fitter and spent the $$ and time to have a pro set you up and when you left the shop you felt like you fit your bike better than ever.  Now you're thinking about tweaking your fit because someone on line says that a different stem would be better?

 

Am I missing something?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Thanks for clarifying 

 

I thought that getting fitted for a bike would make sure you were set up for your personal geometry and that would set you up for riding your bike to its potential(or your potential). 

 

I guess the set up can change if your riding style changes.

 

I read the same TC 

 

Perhaps bike “fitting” needs some definition.  A $30/$40 LBS bike “fitting” may get you in the neighborhood of performance for recreational riding…which is fine.  But it’s not a lock down and often after some ride time a particular issue will fester up…to be fixed by some free of charge forum or riding buddy’s suggestion only to be then followed by another pain in the butt issue…and so on and so on.

 

To move towards higher levels of riding performance and efficiency you’ll be initially investing $200 to $300 working with professional Fitting Specialists using various methods of capture, analysis and deployment in a fitting studio.  Result; a solid baseline that anticipates finer modifications as you gain strength and flexibility including any changes with your riding goals.

 

Suggestions that you mimic a pro “look” or “setup” is a popular shortcut but often derails your long term goals.  While pro trends maybe aligned with your riding interests most folks have not the current strength and flexibility [often genetically predisposed at pro level] including those skills to ride pro geo efficiently, comfortably and safely for a long haul.  Rather, make the second best investment after your bike purchase and get quickly working with an experienced Fitting Specialist who uses programs such as Serotta, the Fit Kit, Retul, Bike Fit Systems or Specialized’s BG Fit.

 

Certainly the tenor of Finn’s OP is correct…professional fitting works for skiing…so too in cycling.

 

*edit... 

Oh…that GF Paragon pictured earlier is a good looking, great handling and outstanding performing HT 29r

 


 


Edited by DonDenver - 6/16/10 at 3:05pm
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

not yet, we're in a recession ya' know. I really like my old ride....

...for now. We ALL know how fickle you are and how susceptible you are to the power of suggestion. 
 

post #36 of 46


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

Quote:

 

 

I read the same TC 

 

Perhaps bike “fitting” needs some definition.  A $30/$40 LBS bike “fitting” may get you in the neighborhood of performance for recreational riding…which is fine.  But it’s not a lock down and often after some ride time a particular issue will fester up…to be fixed by some free of charge forum or riding buddy’s suggestion only to be then followed by another pain in the butt issue…and so on and so on.

 

To move towards higher levels of riding performance and efficiency you’ll be initially investing $200 to $300 working with professional Fitting Specialists using various methods of capture, analysis and deployment in a fitting studio.  Result; a solid baseline that anticipates finer modifications as you gain strength and flexibility including any changes with your riding goals.

 

Suggestions that you mimic a pro “look” or “setup” is a popular shortcut but often derails your long term goals.  While pro trends maybe aligned with your riding interests most folks have not the current strength and flexibility [often genetically predisposed at pro level] including those skills to ride pro geo efficiently, comfortably and safely for a long haul.  Rather, make the second best investment after your bike purchase and get quickly working with an experienced Fitting Specialist who uses programs such as Serotta, the Fit Kit, Retul, Bike Fit Systems or Specialized’s BG Fit.

 

Certainly the tenor of Finn’s OP is correct…professional fitting works for skiing…so to in cycling.  


 


some of the worst set up MTB fits have been so called high end performance fit.

 

The deal is there is always some compromise in a MTB fit. Max pedaling performance would make the bike unrideable and slower where the bike is actually being used.

 

also I found on the phone that he has narrow so called racing bar that are pretty much worthless unless your a retro grouch racer. 

post #37 of 46
Thread Starter 

I think there are two schools of thought here,

 

1- from the roadie perspective, its speed & comfort oriented

2- from a true MTN bike perspective, its performance=handling agility

 

Both are valid and I appreciate them. I am looking for something inbetween and I think I am pretty much there.

 

Don, you are correct about the fitting but on a mountain bike, if less than pro or serious rider, that kind of fitting is not really of value, the shop offers that level of fit but flat out told me it would be a waste of money on this bike but would certainly recommend it for the roadie. This is the level they prefer to start with and then if you are having specific issues or in the initial fitting there are problems identified, they they go from there. My fitting was what he referred to as a mountain fitting but with a little road fit thrown I since I tend to ride longer distances (for MTN bike) on less technical terrain. So what they suggested was to go with this, ride for a while, then see how it feels, come back to adjust. This is most likely why he left the stem at a longer length. I think this is good advice.

 

And Phil, The bikes not for sale! 

post #38 of 46
Thread Starter 

so making decisions based on friends suggestion that is believed to be sound, dependable advice is now a mere suggestion? Hmm...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post



...for now. We ALL know how fickle you are and how susceptible you are to the power of suggestion. 
 

post #39 of 46

Quote:

Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I think there are two schools of thought here,

 

1- from the roadie perspective, its speed & comfort oriented

2- from a true MTN bike perspective, its performance=handling agility

 

Both are valid and I appreciate them. I am looking for something inbetween and I think I am pretty much there.

 

...So what they suggested was to go with this, ride for a while, then see how it feels, come back to adjust. This is most likely why he left the stem at a longer length. I think this is good advice.

 

Absolutely.  And it sounds like you’re working with a good shop  

 

Road fitting and Mtn fitting have some differing objectives but both share the modern approach of making the bike fit you rather than you fit the bike.  That is, if you’ve got huge changes necessary with components to alter your fit chances are you’re on the wrong frame geo to begin with…therefore placing greater emphasis on initial frame fit selection.  Unfortunately first time buyers or those new to road/mtb may not recognize this especially when working with poor shops and soon find themselves on ill fitting machines encountering all kinds of fit issues and bad experiences.  So; buyer beware, you get what you pay for, do your homework, there’s unscrupulous people out there…all that stuff applies.

 

Our LBS fitting specialist describes the differences between road/mtb fits as road is about balancing points to sustain a powerfully efficient position with focus on aero whereas mtb fitting is about obtaining a balanced neutral position where power is quick to generate with focus on subtle handling skills.  He does say fitting road cyclists is more significant up front whereas mountain riders with advanced handling skills benefit more significantly in studio.

 

Now go ride...



 

post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 

post #41 of 46

So let me get this straight.  You got a fitting for $30??  I've started checking around Seattle for prices for a fitting (I'm going to need one as the new owner of the previously mentioned Trek Fuel 98) and am finding prices in the ballpark of $150.  I don't know much about the bike shops around town 'cause I haven't been living here long and haven't been riding at all since I've been here.  Maybe I just need to find the right shop.

post #42 of 46

Keep shopping, I paid 50.00 in Minneapolis...

post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

So let me get this straight.  You got a fitting for $30??  I've started checking around Seattle for prices for a fitting (I'm going to need one as the new owner of the previously mentioned Trek Fuel 98) and am finding prices in the ballpark of $150.  I don't know much about the bike shops around town 'cause I haven't been living here long and haven't been riding at all since I've been here.  Maybe I just need to find the right shop.


You can probably do pretty well with a tape-measure a plumb line a friend and some trial and error.

post #44 of 46
Thread Starter 

yeah, that's true, if you call a shop and explain you are just looking for a basic mtn bike fit, I am sure they will have something like what Greg and I had (although Greg's shop went way beyond the basic fitting for him) But Epic's right the basics (and the majority of what you need) can be done with a plumb bob and tape measure, there are a lot of self-fit guides on line.

post #45 of 46

I just 'fit' my new road bike myself.  Watched a few videos on YouTube - did what they said - rode - made a few minor adjustments for comfort / performance - rode again, and the bike 'feels' much better now.

post #46 of 46
Thread Starter 

interesting fit experience up at Steamboat. Although they did put me up on the trainer and did some basic measurements, the owner and the head of the shop (ibis fanatic) really were more interested in watching me ride around and watching my postioning. they had me ride up a small hill, descend down, jump off a small drop  and ride in circles. From that they dialed in the bike, including sag.  Once I got out on the mountain, I tweaked the seat height but other than that, they were dead-on including the frame size which run a little small due to a shorter head to seat length.

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