EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Backcountry, Telemark, and Cross Country › Where in the country to live for a great backcountry town?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Where in the country to live for a great backcountry town? - Page 2

post #31 of 44

Jackson Hole/ Victor, ID.

 

Teton Pass the Snake River Range and Yellowstone for touring, Bozeman MT near enough, Grand Targhee, Big Sky/ Moonlight Basin/ Bridger Bowl for alpine... oh yeah, and Jackson Freakin' Hole.

post #32 of 44



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

I'm fine with everyone believing that snow in the PNW is always wet and heavy.

 

From a USDA website:

 

Most snow that falls in the Cascade Mountains of Washington and Oregon tends to be higher density snow. In the Cascades, snowpack densities are around 20-30% in the winter to 30-50% in the spring. However, east of the Cascades, the snowpack density is much less. Typical values are 10-20% in the winter and 20-40% in the spring.

 

I have lived in Montana and Washington, and skied around the PNW, including British Columbia.  They can have great snow, but on average it is heavier than in Colorado and Utah, plus the gray sky, flat light and fog factor is much higher.  The PNW gets a ton of snow but, as I mentioned above, there is a quantity vs quality trade off that is real.

post #33 of 44


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Jackson Hole/ Victor, ID.

 

Teton Pass the Snake River Range and Yellowstone for touring, Bozeman MT near enough, Grand Targhee, Big Sky/ Moonlight Basin/ Bridger Bowl for alpine... oh yeah, and Jackson Freakin' Hole.


I was going to say Victor as well.  There is a LOT of backcountry skiing available in a lot of different places - all through the year if you're willing to work a bit (and your standards aren't all that high ). 

 

The west slopes of the Tetons get a whole bunch of snow and most of it is pretty high quality.

 

I don't know what kind of job penny is looking for, but there's a somewhat-thriving economy in the Victor/Driggs area.  One plus is that the housing market in Victor/Driggs got absolutely hammered during the recession and there are homes that are literally selling for half to a third of what they were three years ago. 

 

I'd also vote for Washington/Oregon, but I don't know the local scene well enough to contribute anything worthwhile. 

 

Alaska would be super-cool.  The mountains up there make everything else (including my favorite Tetons) look like Iowa.

post #34 of 44

You will meet the coolest people in Oregon and Washington. "That is if you like folks who are laid back".

post #35 of 44
Thread Starter 

Driggs.  I stopped by there when driving across the country a year ago.  Met some really nice people.  AND there is a fence made out of skis!  Its got to be a great town if people make their fences out of skis!  The Tetons are glorious.  And I do need to work, willing to do pretty much anything... except teach skiing.  Driggs or Girdwood.  Time to think about it and do some more research.  I really appreciate all the amazing suggestions, its been a big help.  You guys all rock!

post #36 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by penny4028 View Post

 

Anyone for Bishop, CA?  The Eastern Sierras are amazing, I just know so little about them.  Although what Stranger said about AK sounds enchanting.  But it is quite far away and requires making a commitment.  I do have a dog, and I'm sure she won't like that trip at all.  But she's a trooper and would be just fine.

I have done a lot of Ski Mountaineering around Bishop, that has to be one of my favorite Spring destinations.  I have never lived there, but for Ski Mountaineering, Mountaineering, Boldering, and Climbing - Bishop is one of the best places I have ever been. 

 

The town seems a little sleepy and probably not a lot of work?

 

post #37 of 44

Stay in Tahoe. Running away isn't the solution.

 

Tahoe BC rocks.

post #38 of 44

Crested Butte has some of the best backcountry skiing minutes from town. Not to mention how awesome of a town it is, super small and friendly. If your looking for that small town feel, check out CB it is amazing out there and offers plenty of backcountry access to any level of skier.

post #39 of 44

Penny,  I haven't been on this forum is quite awhile as my backcountry addiction forced me to take almost the entire past year off (another story for another time).  That being said I have spent the vast majority of my life on skis and for quite ahwile now the backcountry and ski mountaineering have been my calling.  I applaud your desire and wish you well on your quest.  I have been lucky enough to ski a huge variety of places and while the names change, the weather changes a bit, the snow changes, there are a few constants.  You'll be in the mountains!

 

There is great backcountry is so many places you could almost pick blindly and be happy.  Wyoming is magnificent.  Utah has so much to offer in terms of skiing.  The PNW is great touring, spectacular climbs.  Colorado has big peaks, dry snow and TONS of places to go.  AK is another world.  Honestly, you can't go too far wrong. 

 

I've chosen CO for a wide variety of reasons but my reasons are most likely not the same for you.  Make a list of what you want from a place to live.  As much as we all wish, skiing is not the most important part of that list.  Look at the small things that will make you non-skiing life better and choose that way.  The skiing will come, you'll enjoy the mountains most anywhere.  If you were debating CA, UT, CO, WY, WA, and AK there are great differences so really look at the little things you'll need in life.  And we all need those things. 

 

Oh yeah, one final piece of advice, have fun!  Hopefully, I'll be back on the snow this fall and I will be having fun 

post #40 of 44

JACKSON

post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTskier View Post

JACKSON


I will be spending a couple of days in Victor/Driggs this fall as part of a research road trip.  Definitely going to check it out.  "They" say the Tetons are pretty sweet!

post #42 of 44

No place better for running away than Europe, you could always join up with these guys:

ffl.jpg

post #43 of 44
Just my two cents but if I were picking a place to hit the BC aside from Crested Butte, I would vote for:

1. Victor/Driggs/Jackson - take your pick

2. The Alps: talk about a playground. Everything is much bigger and the snowpack is more stable than you find in CO, WY, MT etc... Plus the mountaineering culture is really cool. I'd take a long hard look Verbier.
post #44 of 44

Have you checked out the areas North & South of you? How about Mammoth Lakes area & the Eastern Sierra's unbelievable backcountry? Or go North to Lake Almanor or Shasta. Almanor doesn't have any lifts, but they get lots of snow, 10,400ft Mt Lassen and its got that small town flavor. Or head to Shasta, which has great backcountry & a 14,000ft mountain above the town. Probably has one of the longest vertical rises in the country in the winter.

 

You can check these areas out in a weekend, without having to load your life up in your car/truck & head to unknown town hoping that its what you expected.

 

All the best.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Backcountry, Telemark, and Cross Country › Where in the country to live for a great backcountry town?