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Should I move out west - Page 2

post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobNav1024 View Post

The more I scope out epicski, read this thread, and do some HW, the more pumped I get about a move out there. Thanks ya'll.

 

I've been to a number of mountains/resorts in CO... Breck, Winter Park, Butte, Steamboat, and also to SLC, Jackson and Big Sky.  From my experiences, I'm leaning towards summit county (Epic pass, relative proximity to Denver, feel of the mountains when I was there).

 

What are some opinions/suggestions out there?


Then here's a dose of reality.  There are millions who are currently out of work in this country; many who have been looking for work for over a year.  Most companies are still not hiring, and those that are are being extremely selective.  If you throw away your existing job for skiing, there is a very real chance you will not find another one any time soon. 

 

While your late teens and early 20's would be the time to take a skiing sabbatical, it is a risky thing to do in an economy where jobs are hard to come by.  You don't have enough work experience to make you special, and you are talking about moving out West where your alma mater matters a whole lot less.  Unless you have some really great contacts, you are going to have a tough time competing with the local talent pool who will be much better networked.  All of that argues very strongly against abandoning your existing job until you obtain a new one.

 

In terms of working in the mountains, ski towns are also feeling the recession.  Jobs have dried up here in Summit County.  Here are the current classified listings: http://apps.summitdaily.com/utils/c2/app/v2/index.php?do=category&internetCode=7.  Unbelievably, this is pretty representative of what we've been seeing for job openings for the last year or so (regardless of season).  While I'm sure you could get a job with one of the resorts, you may find that the skiing opportunities won't be nearly as plentiful as you were hoping. 

 

Whether you decide to move to a different city in search of a better "real" job or you decide to chase the dream of living in the mountains, do yourself a favor and have a job lined up before you quit the one you have.  You don't want to end up unemployed because you quit your current job and couldn't find another. 

post #32 of 68

I'm thinking about doing the same thing!  The only thing that has me worried is renting an apartment at the high costs in ski towns.  If I found a roommate it would make things alot more affordable.  Here is my line of thinking on this: "You only live once", and "If you never try then you will never know".

post #33 of 68

I'm thinking about doing the ski bum thing next year as well.  It appears there are a few of us with this grand idea!

post #34 of 68

True, but taking some risks and having some faith can be very rewarding.

post #35 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLem View Post

I'm thinking about doing the ski bum thing next year as well.  It appears there are a few of us with this grand idea!



More than a few.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GLem View Post

True, but taking some risks and having some faith can be very rewarding.


Yes it can. If it is meant to be it will be, as they say..when one lift closes another opens up. 


Edited by Philpug - 6/9/10 at 6:44pm
post #36 of 68

True, but taking some risks and having some faith can be very rewarding. Plus, it's surprising how little money it takes to survive and enjoy life.

post #37 of 68

I would base 0 (zero) percent of a decision to relocate based on stoke I read on Epic, with the possible exception of a good dose of reality from the cautionary posts. It just too important a decision. For starters, you need to sharpen your focus with respect to moving west full time, living in a metropolitan area with more traditional employment, and skiing less frequently, or, living in ski area community with a minimum pay job and 7 months of unemployment. Real world job vs. ski bumming (no offense to those who choose the mountain life). I would bet that all who post here dream of actually living near a major mountain, I, for sure, share this wish. Recognize Epic is a passionate common interest group when it comes to living the skiing life.

It would be very easy to spend a season at a ski area, not much too loose considering you are in a job you hate. You are young enough to give it a try, gather the lessons reality teaches and then make adjustments. An option may to move to a major city a couple of months in advance of ski season and pursue traditional employment.

The big unknown is your personal resiliency and skill set to make the move. Epic posters can share their experiences, but, you are unique and your story is not yet written. Think of an experience in your life when you really expected a positive outcome, for example, getting your present job or a new car. Did it live up to all your expectations or were there unforeseen consequences that dimmed your reality. Lifestyle changes are hard. How do you live while looking for work? Can you cope with minimum pay and the resulting changes to your lifestyle.

I would ask those who live in ski areas to share experiences typical of persons coming to ski areas, such as Skiing in Jackson commenting that better jobs are obtained via networking after being in the area for a extended period. You need to hear some balance.

As Yogi Berra said, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it!”. Whatever path you take, do your best to be successful at it.
 

post #38 of 68

One good possibility would be SLC. Send some resumes to possible employers, fly out for interviews(assuming you get any) and quit your job and move if you get a job in SLC. While SLC is not the most beautiful city (IMHO), the sking is close and world class. With any luck, you have your cake and eat it too.  

post #39 of 68

Agreed.  I have family in Park City and the skiing there is awesome.  Park City Mountain Resort, Deer Valley, The Canyons all are awesome places to ski with lots of vertical.

post #40 of 68

Quote:

Originally Posted by GLem View Post

 The only thing that has me worried is renting an apartment at the high costs in ski towns.  If I found a roommate it would make things alot more affordable. 


I can't speak for all ski towns, but where I live (Steamboat) rental costs are actually very low right now and inventory is very high.  I think this is a pretty common trend for most ski towns as people who can't sell/flip their second home are now trying to rent them to recoup some of the mortgage.  For reference, I rent a fairly large 1bedroom apartment in prime location (1.5mi to ski area 1.5mi to downtown, walk to grocery store) for $600/month and that's pretty close to the going rate on 1beds all across town... and 1beds are going to be your highest per person rental cost.  The bigger the house is the cheaper it tends to be per person... so pretty easy to find a room for $400-500/month.  But as has been said already, jobs are hard to come by nowadays.
 

post #41 of 68



Step #1 down, onto #2..... Quote:

Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post




Admitting you have a problem is the first step in resolving it, so self-awareness of your wanna-be status is a good thing.
 

post #42 of 68

I also say "go for it". At age 24 you truly do have a full life ahead of you. I'd suggest you first take time to understand why you do not like you present job. Is it the company you work for? Is it the people you work with? Is it the type of work you're doing? It's not unusual to study for four years to learn a trade that you later decide you don't like.

My guess is now is a very difficult time to find good employment in a resort area. No real estate sales = no construction jobs = not much anything else going on because so much of the economy revolves around development. Too many people chasing too few jobs. It will be years before housing starts return to NORMAL and it will probably be decades before they reach the levels they reached in the last decade.

I have a good friend that's a board certified plastic surgeon who knew by the time he graduated that he did not want to be a doctor. He stayed with it for about ten years and then used some of the money he saved to go into the estate auction business. He's done that for about 20 years and never regretted the change.

You can change your career at the same time you change your locations.

Don't just look to Denver and SLC if you're planning to work and ski. Smaller towns like Bozeman or Spokane may offer more job opportunity and still be close to the mountains.

If I were you - and wanted to stay in the same industry - I'd put out the job feelers and find a job near the mountains first - then make the move.

One last thought - 24 year old avid skiers who do the typical 24 year old jumping off of stuff are not low risk insurance customers. Their average orthopedic expenses will exceed most 24 year old's average medical cost. $10k here and $10k there can add up quick.

post #43 of 68

$10k here, $10k there?  Insurance covers the majority of those costs.  I jump off stuff; I know my limits though.  I have gone alot faster than I should have on several occasions when I was presented with an open run.  I never got hurt!  I do watch out for people and try to be carefull though.

post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

I also say "go for it". At age 24 you truly do have a full life ahead of you. I'd suggest you first take time to understand why you do not like you present job. Is it the company you work for? Is it the people you work with? Is it the type of work you're doing? It's not unusual to study for four years to learn a trade that you later decide you don't like.

My guess is now is a very difficult time to find good employment in a resort area. No real estate sales = no construction jobs = not much anything else going on because so much of the economy revolves around development. Too many people chasing too few jobs. It will be years before housing starts return to NORMAL and it will probably be decades before they reach the levels they reached in the last decade.

I have a good friend that's a board certified plastic surgeon who knew by the time he graduated that he did not want to be a doctor. He stayed with it for about ten years and then used some of the money he saved to go into the estate auction business. He's done that for about 20 years and never regretted the change.

You can change your career at the same time you change your locations.

Don't just look to Denver and SLC if you're planning to work and ski. Smaller towns like Bozeman or Spokane may offer more job opportunity and still be close to the mountains.

If I were you - and wanted to stay in the same industry - I'd put out the job feelers and find a job near the mountains first - then make the move.

One last thought - 24 year old avid skiers who do the typical 24 year old jumping off of stuff are not low risk insurance customers. Their average orthopedic expenses will exceed most 24 year old's average medical cost. $10k here and $10k there can add up quick.

 

why is my premium so low then? at 26.....

 

just saying young males are by far the cheapest people to insure.
 

post #45 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

Why should I have to pay money to keep fat unhealthy american alive? 


Not your problem?

 

I have the same reaction to ski instructors who ask for generous tips because their employers pay peanuts....

post #46 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

nice car, nice house, good job. we all mistakes :)

 

IMO use the money you have saved up, to make money, and move to the mountains. Denver would suck to live as weekend only skier.

 

Incorrect......no offense intended but you have no idea what you are talking about.
 

post #47 of 68



me too, well, I said that 7 surgeries ago.....  I know you are aware fo this but not all insurance policies are equal, cheap is good until you need it.... 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GLem View Post

$10k here, $10k there?  Insurance covers the majority of those costs.  I jump off stuff; I know my limits though.  I have gone alot faster than I should have on several occasions when I was presented with an open run.  I never got hurt!  I do watch out for people and try to be carefull though.

post #48 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post



Incorrect......no offense intended but you have no idea what you are talking about.
 


It would be a shame for him to ruin an almost perfect record, (while being patently obnoxious about it)

 

A little knowledge.........................

post #49 of 68

I don't recommend moving to a city.  I don't really recommend trying to stay within your field unless you can do it for a resort.  You skills are not perishable as others would like to have you believe.  

 

What you're looking for is not skiing or the mountains.  It certainly seems that way, but it's not the case.  What you're looking for is people, and you're not going to find those people in Denver or SLC, or at least not in the concentrations that make things interesting.  There's this odd thing about people who move to the mountains, they usually all seem to be missing the same piece of their brain and it makes them a pretty unique crowd.  Long after you've forgotten that gnar day you ripped three feet of fresh on your megafats, you'll still remember that day you crammed six people in your car, drove to Vail and saw Ludacris play a completely ludicrous show (and then had to walk a mile back to your car, at which point you stopped off at The George and accidentally ran into Lindsey Vonn and some of her friends hanging out.)  

 

Now, here's the hardest thing you'll face about this: making the decision to move.  Therefore, stop thinking about it and do it.  Here's the fantastic thing - if you made the wrong decision, you just leave the mountains and go get another job.

 

My recommendation would be to start looking at the resorts now to get a feel for their websites and when jobs are posted.  Given you have a decent technical background, the jobs I would strongly consider would be something like a seasonal IT position (they're out there) or seasonal HR.  Oh, you should go look at Mammoth's website, they've had some DB something-or-other IT job posted for a while.

 

You'll love Breckenridge.

post #50 of 68

Some people are prone to injury. Not me; thank God!

post #51 of 68



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobNav1024 View Post

So I'm 24 years old and lived my whole life on the east coast.  I graduated from school out here and have had a job that I've grown to hate for 2 years now.  I'm ready for a move and have my heart set on Colorado.  Now my question is, do I settle in Denver and find another "real job", or do I use what I have saved up to go do my thing in the mountains??  If I choose one, will I regret not choosing the other down the line??  If anyone has experience, what's your take??


24 yr old You Have - no baggage - alittle money saved - a job you hate - What are you waiting for? Try what you want at least for a while!!! I will guarantee you will have baggage in the future that will restrict your movements.

Denver ain't ski area life - SLC is closer to the mountains, but still ain't ski area life. Are you just looking to live closer to the mountians. I have friends that live in both cities that never ski.

Good Luck
 

post #52 of 68

Why don't you tell us what kind of place you want to live in while you're NOT skiing.  Don't talk about that (skiing) for a minute.  Talk about do you want a small town where you know everyone?  Do you want a job interacting with people as opposed to your cubicle world?  Do you want to take a year not really "working"?  You said you want to get out and interact with people, but I don't know what exactly you mean by that.  You want a job that does that or you want to do that when you are not at your job?  I think if you're in a big city it will be hard to get to know anyone in a year really unless you're fortunate enough to land a job at a place where you just fit in right away and that doesn't happen all the time.  Smaller places you keep bumping into the same people all the time and start saying hello quicker, etc. 

post #53 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post



Incorrect......no offense intended but you have no idea what you are talking about.
 


No, I think he is correct. Most people I know that live in Denver, don't ski. 

post #54 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post




No, I think he is correct. Most people I know that live in Denver, don't ski. 


And most people you know who ski, don't love in Denver?

post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post




No, I think he is correct. Most people I know that live in Denver, don't ski. 


That's funny.... 

I ski in Summit County a lot and have many friends who live in Denver and ski 60+ days a year.  

 

Denver may not be the best location to live if you want to move to ski country, but its a good option if you want to live somewhat near skiing.  Heck, the 2(ish) hour commute beats the heck out of my 20 hr commute from Michigan to Summit County, eh?

post #56 of 68

I think the issue with Denver is that while you might be 2 hours away from good skiing, with the traffic, you are still looking at spending the night up there to really enjoy it.  At which point is it better to fly out there for a week at a time and ski versus making the I-70 slog several times per week?

 

That is certainly a question I have struggled with while debating where I want to live.  Right now the answer for me is to live near family and friends then fly to ski big.

post #57 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post




No, I think he is correct. Most people I know that live in Denver, don't ski. 


Well, most people don't ski!  Percentage wise, 15% of Denver residence consider themselves skiers.  SLC is only 7%

post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post




No, I think he is correct. Most people I know that live in Denver, don't ski.

That statement isn't what he was arguing. Most people I know in Denver don't ski, either. Most people don't ski. (Hell, I bet "most" people in Summit County or Vail Valley don't ski.)

 

However,  it doesn't always suck to live in Denver and try to ski. You do need a little flexibility, and it helps a lot to have somewhere to spend the night on some occasions -- whether it's your own place or just a  buddy's couch. It would suck if you were trying to ski 120 days, yes. It would suck if you taught five days a week, although I know plenty of part-time instructors and patrollers who live down here. It just depends on your needs.

 

Personally, I would love to live up there closer somewhere, but my husband can't do it due to work needs, and I prefer the opportunities down here for my kids (well, I think I do -- at this point it's moot, because they would kill me if we moved, ha ha). Maybe when they graduate from high school or something.

 

BUT if I were 24 and unencumbered, I would not live in Denver. I would move to the mountains and try it out. I meant to do that -- I was on my way to Vail in 1989-1990 season, and was sidetracked by what I thought would be a 6- to 9-month stint in Washington DC. (The 90-91 season would always be there, right?) However, I became encumbered, lol, and didn't move back to CO until 2000. I can't really say I have regrets, but I sort of do. Things worked out really well, and who knows what would have happened otherwise. But I'll always wonder. So good luck ... the practical matters others have brought up are important; I'm sure you can figure it out, though.

post #59 of 68

 

well, i made this decsion 10 years ago.

 

i agree with others, you should make it now; as trhey roots will be too great to do it in 5 or 10 years.

 

not sure if youre exactly the same, but Houston is my hometown w/ family and friends; if you go youre going to most likely spend some or all of your vacation time some years to visit them. if you stay in the hometown, your vacation will be more your decision. if youre moving out to denver or SLC strictly for skiing and not becuase you love everything mountain states and those cities have; it might be better to stay.

 

also, i had a seriously ill family member that was that way for a year. now this doesnt happen to most people; but i'm sure glad i was 30 minutes away and not a 2 hour flight and having to get time off work to be supportive.

 

just considerations.

post #60 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skicougar View Post

 

well, i made this decsion 10 years ago.

 

i agree with others, you should make it now; as trhey roots will be too great to do it in 5 or 10 years.

 

not sure if youre exactly the same, but Houston is my hometown w/ family and friends; if you go youre going to most likely spend some or all of your vacation time some years to visit them. if you stay in the hometown, your vacation will be more your decision. if youre moving out to denver or SLC strictly for skiing and not becuase you love everything mountain states and those cities have; it might be better to stay.

 

also, i had a seriously ill family member that was that way for a year. now this doesnt happen to most people; but i'm sure glad i was 30 minutes away and not a 2 hour flight and having to get time off work to be supportive.

 

just considerations.


All good points, especially the bold. For example, if you find it important to live near a beach, Colorado is not too great. I feel the same way about the beach that a lot of people feel about skiing: it's fun, but once a year is enough for me.

 

That said, I know very few people who moved here from the east and didn't love it (after the first year of treeless shock, anyway). I can think of one family who moved back to North Carolina, but that was after the crazy unusual year of snow down here and (mostly?) the high housing prices. And I don't think they were skiers, anyway. I know several families who had to move back, for one reason or the other (usually job), but didn't want to.  Most stay.

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