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MTB tips and tricks, post them here.... - Page 2

post #31 of 51

Protect your head.

post #32 of 51



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post



 


Oh yea, that reminds me that it is OK to walk a section if you think you can't clean it.
 


 

Along the same lines -  avoid handlebar dismounts.

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post



 


Oh yea, that reminds me that it is OK to walk a section if you think you can't clean it.
 

 

it is but trying stuff right there on the spot and keep trying it you get it progresses skills faster. There is certain section of trail I walk now when stuff is wet though because I know after trying things a couple dozen times I just cant ride that log when its soaked.

 

I have seen people start MTB in pittsburgh and walk every single log pile, let me tell you how not fun it is. IF you scared of a 8inch log you aint going anywhere on the trails around here, and you will eventually quit.

 


 

post #34 of 51

^^^ One of the best tricks to learn actually is falling off of your bike well.  It's very rational for many riders to not want to fall, at all, because if you're not used to it it's easy to get hurt. 

 

Since most people live in a suburban (or urban) setting, taking your MTB out for rides that link curbs, parking blocks, speed bumps, etc. with the odd park trail is also a good way to work on making small obstacles a normal part of trail riding.  In new subdivisions in the west, there seem to be a lot of "soft" curbs that are basically 1/2 of a speedbump -- these are also great for working on bump-jumps up, then various ways of getting back off. 

post #35 of 51

Can we go back to switchbacks?  here's the scenario, very steep climbs on 180 switchbacks, little room on trail for turn. In lowest gear possible to climb, I find I have balance issues let alone the climbing aspect. Strategies for the climb? angle of attack, cadence, body position?? I will be out in Steamboat next month and back on the trails with some locals who love kicking my ass on these rides..

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Can we go back to switchbacks?  here's the scenario, very steep climbs on 180 switchbacks, little room on trail for turn. In lowest gear possible to climb, I find I have balance issues let alone the climbing aspect. Strategies for the climb? angle of attack, cadence, body position?? I will be out in Steamboat next month and back on the trails with some locals who love kicking my ass on these rides..

 

yeah


body position - chest as low as it needs to keep the front end from 'wandering" if you lose rear tire traction.

 

cadence/gears - lowest gear is normally not a good place to go. It simply doesnt allow the balance you need and the traction. I normally use either middle front ring and lowest in the rear(2-1) or if I am on a hill steep enough to warrant granny I upshift the rear cassette to the middlish giving me more balance and traction.

 

balance - read my track stands post. tracks stands are a key fundemental movement that help greatly in this situation.

 

line - looks at my diagram. lines goes as follow.

         body- inside, inside, inside

         front wheel - inside,outside, than inside

 

other - anything over 30 psi is plain stupid in any XC riding, it would be like skiing ICE on spatulas well not quite that bad but pretty bad. Tubeless is the ONLY way to go. Tubes have never made sense. Alot of what I can do I simply cannt do with tires overly inflated

 

post #37 of 51

Bush, thanks! yeah part of the issue was in the lowest gear, you are peddeling so quickly, it's hard to balance, I have a hrd time keep in the front wheel on course, if you wander more than a foot or so, it's not a nice tumble off the side. I will try a little higher gear but its that steep, the other guys are all in their grannies/climbing gears. no kidding avg speed is about 1-2mph

post #38 of 51

I've noticed it easier to climb in the second biggest back cog than the biggest one too.  If that 1st gear isn't for climbing steep hills, what's it for, biking in tar?

post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I've noticed it easier to climb in the second biggest back cog than the biggest one too.  If that 1st gear isn't for climbing steep hills, what's it for, biking in tar?


alot of people take it off.....I normally dont run mine an instead use a 1x9. or lately Single speed.

 

I think something 26/35 for is much better for 2 rings up front a on MTB, 22 in the front really makes no sense IMO.

post #40 of 51

Makes no sense for you, or makes no sense for anyone?

post #41 of 51

I was thinking it was just me.  I have very strong legs, but am not in shape due to lack of training.  I find it easier to just reef up on the handle bars as I push down with my foot.  Notice I said foot, not feet.  It's definitely a one, two thing, and I find balance during the change from foot 1 to foot 2 to be a challenge on very steep climbs.

 

I was working on using the lower gear and just continually peddling at a higher stroke rate, and making some progress.  That has stopped because my rear cog is on the blink again or my chain is slipping on the gears again.  If I pedal hard it skips.

 

I also can't seem to move my feet very fast.  I could at one time move my right foot fast enough to kick a black belt in the nose from a stand still, but I never could keep up for long with the bike at 40 mph on a downslope. .  (BTW it's still the Ralliegh GP like this one http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleighs/catalogs/1976/images/10-76-grand-prix.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleighs/catalogs/1976/pages/10-76-grand-prix.html&h=650&w=800&sz=117&tbnid=tKKSZaLMJZyglM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=143&prev=/images%3Fq%3Draleigh%2Bgrand%2Bprix&usg=__tUtrr2uL9194ix0STwkrwhkO9lY=&sa=X&ei=GoETTJ_QLMG78gbp58yeDA&ved=0CCsQ9QEwAw )

 

So who uses the smaller gear and what's it for?

 

And yes I know your granny gear is a lot smaller than mine, it's worse when I borrow a purpose-built off-road bike.

 

EDIT: I probably need a new chain.  Nothing's made to last these days; it can't be more than 34 years old!


Edited by Ghost - 6/12/10 at 6:11am
post #42 of 51
Thread Starter 

Something as simple as a peddle stroke, I overheard this then tried it. At the bottom of the peddle stroke, imagine that you have something on the bottom of your shoe and are wiping it off on carpet or such. I found by doing this my peddle efficiency immediately went up. Try it, see if it works for you too. 

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I've noticed it easier to climb in the second biggest back cog than the biggest one too.  If that 1st gear isn't for climbing steep hills, what's it for, biking in tar?


Certainly.  As in really steep paved roads for one, or dirt where you can get the traction.

 

I just finished a 970 km ride from the Italian border to Toulouse, following a medieval pilgrimage route across the south of France.  A lot of really steep mountains, where I used the 22x34 every day, and would have gone lower if I had one.  The Haute Laguedoc is like West Virginia on steroids, far harder riding than I've found in the Rockies, or the pilgrimage routes in Switzerland.

 

I'll agree, when you are down to a 22x34, you are not going much faster than walking, and keeping traction is unlikely in something that steep, but if you put some panniers on the rear, on the really steep pitches  you can keep get the traction and keep riding, out of the saddle, up stuff which is nearly too steep to push a bike up.  It is easier if you can stay on the bike, because mountain bike shoes don't give enough traction to comfortably push up a road like that. After those pitches, I'd spin that low gear for a bit just to recover.


 

post #44 of 51

I use my granny gear all the time.

 

There is technique involved, and pulling up on the bars as you mash down on the pedals isn't it. You need to keep your weight centered on the bike, drop your chest down toward the top tube, keep your elbows in and your forearms parallel to the top tube. If you are going to pull on the bars, pull straight back not up. Concentrate on (as Phil mentioned) scraping your foot through the bottom of the pedal stroke and pushing across the top of the pedal stroke (think: from 11 to 2 and 4 to 7 on a clock). Spin, don't mash. Don't pull up on the front wheel. Relax your grip on the bars and keep your upper body still as you can.

post #45 of 51


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I use my granny gear all the time.

 

There is technique involved, and pulling up on the bars as you mash down on the pedals isn't it. You need to keep your weight centered on the bike, drop your chest down toward the top tube, keep your elbows in and your forearms parallel to the top tube. If you are going to pull on the bars, pull straight back not up. Concentrate on (as Phil mentioned) scraping your foot through the bottom of the pedal stroke and pushing across the top of the pedal stroke (think: from 11 to 2 and 4 to 7 on a clock). Spin, don't mash. Don't pull up on the front wheel. Relax your grip on the bars and keep your upper body still as you can.

Thanks Whiteroom.  That's what I'm working on, or will be when I get that new chain.
 

post #46 of 51

Good stuff here and Newfy, killer ride, where the TR and pics???  Yes, the one section is easier to ride and creep up than to push, that's where I was really havig problems with the front tire and keeping a solid steady cadence. I need to find some good hills around here and practice, there are plenty.

post #47 of 51

Finn I was wondering the same. Where are the pics?

post #48 of 51

Another tip.  If you can't avoid an object hit it as square on as possible.  Hitting a rock or log at a 45 degree angle or less will often result in your front wheel being turned resulting in a crash.

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




alot of people take it off.....I normally dont run mine an instead use a 1x9. or lately Single speed.

 

I think something 26/35 for is much better for 2 rings up front a on MTB, 22 in the front really makes no sense IMO.


I don't know where you ride, but in the Sierras you will find yourself using the 22X34 combo at times. A while back I went to an 11x32 cassette and missed the bail-out ability that the 34 cog gave me-esp when my legs were spent. So I run an 11x34.
 

post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



 

it is but trying stuff right there on the spot and keep trying it you get it progresses skills faster. There is certain section of trail I walk now when stuff is wet though because I know after trying things a couple dozen times I just cant ride that log when its soaked.

 

 


 

True, but after a bike cause shoulder seperation and being the age that I am, I reserve the right to walk.  (I would really hate having a bike crash screw up my ski season)

 

Now if I were 30 years younger...........

 

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post




I don't know where you ride, but in the Sierras you will find yourself using the 22X34 combo at times. A while back I went to an 11x32 cassette and missed the bail-out ability that the 34 cog gave me-esp when my legs were spent. So I run an 11x34.
 


I think you under est people who can ride a SS for 30+ miles a couple times a week:). 

 

but if I run gears Ill run a 11-34(or 36) before I put a 22 tooth granny gear on my bike. 

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