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Pump Tracks/Parks...are these everywhere?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hey gang, I did a quick search and didn't find a thread on pump tracks.   Our pump park was built last season  (Hailey, ID/ 2009).  I'm scared to death on the thing, but sure enjoy watching the riders work the track.  Are these being built everywhere? Riders are way into it.

 

It's got to be the most efficient bike track/park using 1/8 acre imaginable.  2 Thumbs!

 

 

post #2 of 18

scared to death of a pump track? REALLY? your getting no AIR!!! at all!!

 

Go out and try it it will make you a better all around biker(including XC and road), most places that dont have pump tracks do have BMX tracks. To be a world class MTBer takes some practice on one of these things.

 

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

I supposed "scared to death" should be replaced with " concerned with getting an unplanned dirt facial".    The 180 corners look easier from the picnic table, that's for sure.

 

There is a lot to learn and a lot of fun to be had at pump tracks, no doubt. They have a relative small footprint compared to a bmx course while offering multiple lines and circuits to mix up the repetition.  They should be everywhere and that's what I was wondering, are they being built nationwide?

 

People here a buying specialized pump track bikes, some use bmx bikes.  The people riding mtn bikes look awkward and that's how I felt when I rode the track.

 

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

I supposed "scared to death" should be replaced with " concerned with getting an unplanned dirt facial".    The 180 corners look easier from the picnic table, that's for sure.

 

There is a lot to learn and a lot of fun to be had at pump tracks, no doubt. They have a relative small footprint compared to a bmx course while offering multiple lines and circuits to mix up the repetition.  They should be everywhere and that's what I was wondering, are they being built nationwide?

 

People here a buying specialized pump track bikes, some use bmx bikes.  The people riding mtn bikes look awkward and that's how I felt when I rode the track.

 

 

 

you feeling awkward is lack of skill. It ok though I could relate years ago and tons of guys I ride with who have been riding as long as I have been alive still cant handle a bike.

 

 You should be able to ride a pump track on anything with reasonable travel(hardtail though about 5).

 

the 180s turns are fun you just have to realize you body needs to be into the turn prior to the bike and your are pushing down hard right in the middle of the turn. The forward pumps are almost actually like bump absorbstion if done correctly its amazing how fast you can go.

 

some tips on bike

 

high pressure always sucks in your tires whether on pump track, downhill or riding XC. Run tubeless run 20-30 psi this will make your tires grip in turns. It will also make them roll faster so its easier to pump. 

 

tires - run micro knobies. With really micro knobs being like a small block eight to almost full knobbies like a panaracer fire XC. Alot of tires work one I can say for sure sucks is the Kenda Nevegal the tire is worst cornering tire ever.

 

shorter stem - no matter what you think is 'right" 100 mm or less

 

wider bars - for almost anyone 27-30 inches is ideal unless you have really wide or narrow shoulder narrow bar of yester yore have never made sense from a physics stand point. The wider bars will help you  everywhere except super tight trees, and in Idaho you dont have super tight trees. When I see narrow bars I just have to laugh at the thought that goes into that. 

 

dirt jump bike are ideal but I love my 4 inch XCish bike on pump track and BMX tracks. As long as the suspension doest suck suspension can actually help you. Again like most people's riding skills most suspensions suck, in most case people rear legs are better.

 

slam the seat and get it out of the way, you should not be relying on the seat for bike handling at anytime anywise but instead use your feet and hands

 

 

 

skills prior to hitting the pump track

 

learn how far forward you can get on your bike

learn how far back you can get

learn to corner using angles on a bike

learn how compressed you can get(aka flex)

learn how extended you can get

 

skills on the pump track , your a mogul skier. Pressure managment is key to mogul skiing and its key here. 

 

In the most basic sense your making yourself as light as possible on every uphill and as heavy as possible on every downhill. Your doing this though very exaggerated 'pumping" and fore and aft rocking combined with the pumping. 

 

every short uphill your light and slightly aft.

every down hill your heavy and forward.

 

like so

 

notice how far for and aft and how much movement there is going on here.

 

 

 

go back give it a honest go take videos and Ill make you better.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Good suggestions and lesson BushPA.  I will give it another try soon.  I have felt the pump (gyro like) on the bumps, the corners with speed...eeek.   Need more time for sure.  It's been very wet here, the track has been closed a lot the past few weeks.

post #6 of 18

errr... gotta disagree with you on the 'pump', Josh. You don't want to rock back and forth, it's all in the hips and feet, the upper body should be light and stable, the bike might move back and forth... but the body shouldn't follow it. The pump comes purely from directing pressure straight down from the hips through the feet into the pedals (if you have to pedal on a pumptrack you are doing it WRONG, by the way). Let the bike move under you, learn to time your 'pump' and soon you will be generating speed that you won't believe... and you can take this 'free speed' out onto the trails with you.

 

The 'key', in my opinion, is getting from: "Riding on my bike" to "riding with my bike".

 

Check out what the pro's look like: http://www.leelikesbikes.com/video-of-sea-otter-pro-pump-race.html

 

 

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

errr... gotta disagree with you on the 'pump', Josh. You don't want to rock back and forth, it's all in the hips and feet, the upper body should be light and stable, the bike might move back and forth... but the body shouldn't follow it. The pump comes purely from directing pressure straight down from the hips through the feet into the pedals (if you have to pedal on a pumptrack you are doing it WRONG, by the way). Let the bike move under you, learn to time your 'pump' and soon you will be generating speed that you won't believe... and you can take this 'free speed' out onto the trails with you.

 

The 'key', in my opinion, is getting from: "Riding on my bike" to "riding with my bike".

 

Check out what the pro's look like: http://www.leelikesbikes.com/video-of-sea-otter-pro-pump-race.html

 

 

the sea otter video is rad as hell. That step up to turn to double the berm was REALLY commiting.

 

With that said the pros are leaving the ground slightly aft and landing slightly forward.

 

Leelikebikes agree with me. I just find the article on his site specifically about pumping but did find this.

 

http://www.leelikesbikes.com/interview-with-me-about-riding-skills.html

I have sent him an Email asking for the correct link or what his stance on the fore and aft movement it.
 

post #8 of 18

My point is, it often looks like people are pushing down on the handlebars and lifting up on the handlebars as they go around a pumptrack. That is 100% not what should be done, I get where you are coming from with the movement, I just feel that that movement is more a function of allowing the bike to move independently from the rider... which is KEY, but I think that it's separate from the pump. Does that make sense?

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

My point is, it often looks like people are pushing down on the handlebars and lifting up on the handlebars as they go around a pumptrack. That is 100% not what should be done, I get where you are coming from with the movement, I just feel that that movement is more a function of allowing the bike to move independently from the rider... which is KEY, but I think that it's separate from the pump. Does that make sense?


I would say I pump with both my legs and my arms but yes the upper body doesnt move.

 

and yes I agree that you should ride with your bike and not on your bike.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

I can relate to the light and stable position of the chest, focus of energy, that's what I attempt to do with my upperbody when mogul skiing.  Float and center the chest, with all the action happening from the hips on down. 

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the Otter link, those guys tear it up!

post #12 of 18

I think one of the things that make it like bump skiing is that it is so much about timing. If the timing is off, it just doesn't work. I feel al little bit of fore-aft when I pump, but I don't think that's a very big part of it.

post #13 of 18

What do you experienced pump trackers think of this vid?

post #14 of 18

Video is gr8 -- everytime I see that backyard I get a serious case of at least one, and maybe two, deadly sins.  Maybe even three.

 

To the extent that JC is being tongue in cheek as to what people think, I think what we're dealing with here is the video stating what you actually need to do in terms of torso displacement relative to 1) bike and 2) terrain, but:  notice the pump tracks build strong legs, cores, and backs/shoulders (if you say back aren't core), but not mega triceps, biceps and pecs.  I.e. the engine of all of your movement is still primarily coming from your legs.  But, the use of upper body is one way where pump-tracking -- which I agree is great x-training for moguls, and have regularly advocated for that purposes -- is quite different from some of the specifics of mogul skiing.

 

Pumping on flat terrain makes more clear that the upper body has to be involved:  no upper body displacement = nada pump.

 

BTW, re: using bmx bikes as mentioned above, one great thing about them is that they're quite inexpensive relative to mountain bikes.  And, their responsiveness can make pumping a figure 8 in the driveway both great cross-training and a great workout.  If you haven't ridden one, consider asking your local bike shop to try at least a 24" cruiser just to check out the feeling. 

 

 

 

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

To the extent that JC is being tongue in cheek as to what people think...


Actually I was being quite serious/sincere. I thought the clip, (especially the slo-mo parts), provided a good riding example, and since it doesn't have a lot of quick edits is more easily digested than some other videos.

 

But then there are a lot of strongly-opinionated folk on this board, and I figured some might find the style/techniques as presented lacking.   ;-)

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Video is gr8 -- everytime I see that backyard I get a serious case of at least one, and maybe two, deadly sins.  Maybe even three.

 

To the extent that JC is being tongue in cheek as to what people think, I think what we're dealing with here is the video stating what you actually need to do in terms of torso displacement relative to 1) bike and 2) terrain, but:  notice the pump tracks build strong legs, cores, and backs/shoulders (if you say back aren't core), but not mega triceps, biceps and pecs.  I.e. the engine of all of your movement is still primarily coming from your legs.  But, the use of upper body is one way where pump-tracking -- which I agree is great x-training for moguls, and have regularly advocated for that purposes -- is quite different from some of the specifics of mogul skiing.

 

Pumping on flat terrain makes more clear that the upper body has to be involved:  no upper body displacement = nada pump.

 

BTW, re: using bmx bikes as mentioned above, one great thing about them is that they're quite inexpensive relative to mountain bikes.  And, their responsiveness can make pumping a figure 8 in the driveway both great cross-training and a great workout.  If you haven't ridden one, consider asking your local bike shop to try at least a 24" cruiser just to check out the feeling. 

 

 

 


they are actually using DJ which are more user friendly than BMX bikes. BMX bikes though are PUMP machines!

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




they are actually using DJ which are more user friendly than BMX bikes. BMX bikes though are PUMP machines!


Nailbender had mentioned bmx bikes up above.  Some people do rock even 20" bmx bikes on "regular" pump tracks, and some bmx riders build bmx specific tracks, though you're right that DJ hardtails are kind of the standard ride for most people on them.  You're totally right on how good bmx bikes are for this type of riding.  They can be demanding/frustrating too, particularly the 20", because they lose speed faster also, but that's one reason why they build good technique.

 

I totall agree with JC that Mark Weir provides a good riding example. 

 

You should post more footage of the local bmx track you ride if you're still by one these days, as a ski instructor you can explain better how it crosses over to skiing.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




Nailbender had mentioned bmx bikes up above.  Some people do rock even 20" bmx bikes on "regular" pump tracks, and some bmx riders build bmx specific tracks, though you're right that DJ hardtails are kind of the standard ride for most people on them.  You're totally right on how good bmx bikes are for this type of riding.  They can be demanding/frustrating too, particularly the 20", because they lose speed faster also, but that's one reason why they build good technique.

 

I totall agree with JC that Mark Weir provides a good riding example. 

 

You should post more footage of the local bmx track you ride if you're still by one these days, as a ski instructor you can explain better how it crosses over to skiing.


yeah I have couple quick clips from last fall/ Only ridden the trails/BMX track this year a couple times since the rain makes those trails muddy messes.

 

Once we dry out though I ll try to get some videos. 

 

I do have my BMX race bike built back up, but it feels so weird to me compared to my MTBs.

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