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Blending Movements - Page 16

post #451 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookie Bewley Hale View Post

Snowbender - about Bode - he is definitely unique and soooo strong. He goes for it and is constantly adapting all the time. What an athlete. It'd be great to be able to perform like he does. One thing you can say for sure in every turn, from the stivots to the rounder arcs, Bode certainly shows it's about two lines - one for your body and one for your skis.  Certainly a mental game there too.

 

Yes, the way he jumps into that 2nd slipping-turn demonstrates he sees the line before it exists.

 

One of the really cool things that I almost like the best about skiing is that it totally transports you into another world. You forget about everything else and live in the moment - and what a great moment that is! smile.gif More Zen huh

 

Yes, be oneness with gravity, the world is all yours. And that's Taichi Skiing.

post #452 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

 

Great observation Cookie and clearly differentiates the two.  This goes right back to the way I see TDK6 ski wedge turns (active weight shift)... the angulation is contrived and moves the upper body around unnecessarily and over edges the ski for the amount of forces present.  This causes the skier to work harder than necessary to turn, when other movements are more efficient, but I will probably never convince my friend of this fact.
 


Bud, glad you picked up my wedging because I just stumbled onto a very interesting video. I have no clue to what they say because its in japanese but it is a demonstration between two kind of wedging techniques. And it tangents our discussion here since Im of the opinion that PJ's original photo sequence used a traditional up-and-down movement pattern extending through the transition and flexing through out the turn. Its not been clearly understood by everyone here Im sure. Look at both styles. And what makes it so interesting for me at least is that the optional wedging technique presented in this video is exactly how I learned to wedge in Austria in the 70s. Its really a drill. It would be very nice to have a translation. Maybe we have a japanese lurking... help!

 

 

BTW, when I showed this drill on video many years ago here it was said to be crapola. Lets see if things have changed....

post #453 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbender View Post


We both are "ex" snowboarders.
 



I have had many students that switched from snowboard to skiing. Come to think of two in particular. This one guy made totally different right and left turns. Banking his turn to the right while angulating to the left. I could not get that one fixed. He was a very strong skier and the movement pattern was so ingrained it was totally impossible.

 

The second guy was one that had switched to skis and taken a week long lesson in the same group with my whife on a holliday. My whife then asked me to give the guy a lesson since he was very dissapointed in the group lesson. I was on holliday but took the guy for a spinn. He was banking all his turns. Leaning in heavily. He was struggling. It only took me an hour to get it fixed. As soon as he started to understand that skiing is counterintuitive (is that a word?) and by moving left you turn right and the other way arround he was like a totally different skier. That all that there is to it.

 

I see the same stuff going on in the clips of ýou guys. It might be fun but only as long as you are on a flat groomer and you dont care what guys like me think of it. BTW, skiing without poles is a very good drill if nothing else.

post #454 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookie Bewley Hale View Post

 

Thanks.

 

Pink pants were short turns. Striped pants were medium radius turns. More square in the larger turns. More "counter" in short turns because that is where I was going - more down the hill. In that last pink pants picture, I had my hips too countered - habit I picked up from skiing on one leg while my "bad" leg was recovering - keep the weight off the bad leg by putting the hips over the good leg....

 



Why do you want less counter when doing short turns? I for one think that when you do short turns your upper body should face down the fall line all the time.

post #455 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookie Bewley Hale View Post

Here is an example of another "old" technique that is still very valid today- from the 1960's from the French, Light Christie or Christiana Leger or Projection Circulaire.

 

Looks like banking, but it's not. There is always more weight on the outside ski. Stand tall, stay pretty square and tip to the turn forces.

 

 

TDK - Re angulation - projection circulaire doesn't have any really. Also, regarding your angulation in your video - you are a strong skier, so you can keep you weight distributed on your outside ski even when you move your hip to the inside on low speed turns. However, it is not necessary to move your hip that far inside when the turn forces do not warrant it yet.

 

I just prefer to have angulation that is driven by balance and guiding the CoM, not tipping of the upper body, but where the legs are tipped and the upper body is guided to a more upright position - only when the turn forces warrant it. I realize that we disagree on this.

 

Efficient skiing for me involves keeping the CoM guided and directed on a line that involves only movements necessary for balance and direction change. Tipping the spine when it's with inclination and stacking to the turn forces is okay when at the top of the turn going into the apex. That tipping is lining the body up to deal with the turn forces and at the same time, moving the CoM in a more direct line to the inside of the turn. After the apex, moving the CoM in a line towards the next turn, as the spine becomes more vertical, is again, balance and guiding without tipping it.

 

Killy above is an example of staying balanced against the outside ski throughout the turn without any angulation - very relaxed and very balanced. Stacking the bones all the time.

 

Projection circulaire keeps the whole body balanced to the turn forces all the time and involves the CoM moving more. However, the upright stance keeps you from getting your thighs tired and as a recreational skiing technique, you can ski long long runs, without stopping, at a pretty good clip and not get tired.



Nice skiing of Killy. Nothing special about it though. He remains very "stacked" and is inclining with no angulation. I remember when we used to ski like that. I have a photo of it in an photo album. Our instructor was calling it riding a motorbike.

 

Efficient.... in free skiing efficient is whatever gets the job done with minimum effort and you are safe and sound down the mountain. If that is what you are striving for then I dont really care how you ski as long as you dont hurt yourself and others. Doesent look that way from what Ive read and seen so I guess you have my permission to ski like you do. But its not how you ski that I object to. Its how you present it in typing and words. You are a great writer nothing wrong there. But clearly you are not on the same wave length with others here. Also your use of Ligerty is a bit confusing if you only want to ski outside the gates just for fun and with minimum effort. I go to the gym and I try to keep fit. I ski to get my muscles used to the movements and I coach others to do the same. Not all of us run gates but being fit is a must for advanced level skiing be it carving on a groomer, powder, moguls or race tracks. Ligerty is angulating so why are you not? The answere is pritty obvious, he is a racer and you are not. Nothing I hold against you. Not everybody has to be a racer to ski well.

 

Also, its not hard to tip your skis by angulating and weighting your outside ski. Its very very simple. Thats the whole point. But many people, especially the young ones dont understand this. I had a know it all 16y x-racer that wanted to become a instructor. This guy could not angulate and weight his outside ski. He had been running gates all his life. No wonder he was a drop out but who the hell coaches kids like that. He had no future in instruction eather.

 

All you guys and gals reading this and wondering about what is right and what is wrong. If you want to improve your skiing listen up: skiing is counterintuitive. Move left and you turn right and vice versa. Remember to stay forward and pressure your outside ski. Move your hips into the turn and your shoulders out. Dont rotate into the turn. Dont weight your inside ski. Upper body goes out and hips go in. PM me if you have any more questions.

post #456 of 492

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

I have had many students that switched from snowboard to skiing. Come to think of two in particular. This one guy made totally different right and left turns. Banking his turn to the right while angulating to the left. I could not get that one fixed. He was a very strong skier and the movement pattern was so ingrained it was totally impossible.

 

Guess the trends are changing. When I started to snowboard ('94) some boarders were proudly proclaimed that they were "ex" skiers, meaning they no longer skiing, left and right, guess that's how they feel their uniqueness.

 

The second guy was one that had switched to skis and taken a week long lesson in the same group with my whife on a holliday. My whife then asked me to give the guy a lesson since he was very dissapointed in the group lesson. I was on holliday but took the guy for a spinn. He was banking all his turns. Leaning in heavily. He was struggling. It only took me an hour to get it fixed. As soon as he started to understand that skiing is counterintuitive (is that a word?) and by moving left you turn right and the other way arround he was like a totally different skier. That all that there is to it.

 

I taught myself snowboarding. I've figured if I can teach people skiing, which proves that my skiing/sliding knowledge is correct, why can't I teach myself snowboarding? I did, so I transported my skiing knowledge into snowboarding skills. As my snowboarding skills improved and evolved I developed the "Flatboarding" theory, which basically is to slide the board "flat." There's no better thrill than riding the flat board through powder or cut-ups, imo,

 

 

Nevertheless, I got bored with the rest of the snowboarding, especially the "operational" (take the rare foot out to get on the lifts, etc.) aspects of snowboarding, so when I learned how to ski the powder, I quit snowboarding. Then again, I ported the snowboarding knowledge—Flatboarding—back to skiing, so here we are, Flatboarding skiing. I should have called it "Flatskiing," but again, I may confused myself, so I stuck it with "Flatboarding."

 

 

 

I see the same stuff going on in the clips of ýou guys. It might be fun but only as long as you are on a flat groomer and you dont care what guys like me think of it. BTW, skiing without poles is a very good drill if nothing else.

 

Another "big mountain," eh? Sorry, but no, I don't practice "Turn-skiing" much anymore, now I'm into Line-skiing and the Art of Skiing. No drills, but "learn on the run."

 

 

'later, :)

post #457 of 492

Snowbender, it's not a "big mountain" thing, it's a "steep" thing.  My mountain is only about 1,000 vertical feet, but if I tried to ski it the way you are displaying I'd pick up too much speed and be dangerous, not only to others, but to myself.

 

Skiing is not only about long wide open turns, short turns are a necessary skill in steep terrain and to control speed on crowded slopes, or to avoid other skiers.

 

So again I say, enjoy it, but be careful.  Mostly why not back off on the "my way is better and more advanced then your way" claims.  That's more of a WWF wrestling statement, then a Tai Chi statement. 

post #458 of 492

Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz go_quote.gif

Snowbender, it's not a "big mountain" thing, it's a "steep" thing.  My mountain is only about 1,000 vertical feet, but if I tried to ski it the way you are displaying I'd pick up too much speed and be dangerous, not only to others, but to myself.

 

Guess you just have to have "better" control wherever you ski, and that's a "better" skill, isn't it? Just how "steep" you "big mountain" is?

 

 

 

 

Skiing is not only about long wide open turns, short turns are a necessary skill in steep terrain and to control speed on crowded slopes, or to avoid other skiers.

 

Are you saying that I cannot do "short turns"  or you're just being pedantic about it?

 

So again I say, enjoy it, but be careful.  Mostly why not back off on the "my way is better and more advanced then your way" claims.  That's more of a WWF wrestling statement, then a Tai Chi statement. smile.gif

 

Why I've tasted "sore grapes"? In denying "my way is better and more advanced then your way," are you not saying "my way is better and more advanced then your way," yeah, go figure.

post #459 of 492

What I said was that I don't like your saying that your way is more advanced and better.  I never said anything about me.

 

Honestly  I have seen and skied with some great skiers and I would say they are better then you (or whoever is in that video.)  This person doesn't look graceful or efficient to me, they look like they're in a constant balance recovery state.  

 

I have not seen you (or whoever is in the videos) do short turns so how can I say that you can or cannot?

 

 

Plus it comes off as sleazy that you come back here with another screen name, deny it's you in the videos, then talk about it being you in the video.  Honesty is definitely a better way.


Edited by SkiMangoJazz - 7/10/10 at 1:19pm
post #460 of 492

Snowbender,
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbender View Post
 

Another "big mountain," eh? Sorry, but no, I don't practice "Turn-skiing" much anymore, now I'm into Line-skiing and the Art of Skiing. No drills, but "learn on the run."

 


OK.  So you like long runs without much turning.

 

Then you post this to show that you, Aang, or whoever it is, can do steeps, and all of a sudden the long straight runs become side to side traverse.  All you did was take short radius turns and add a longer transition to it.  In the first few seconds, around 10 or 14, you'll see a skier come in to view on the right side that is taking a more direct route down the mountain and looks to be in 100% control (at least through the couple of seconds he was in the frame).  There is no flow or fluidity in the skier you are videoing.  It looked like it was a struggle.  Tai Chi is all about fluid and flowing movements with no wasted energy and 100% control.

 

Even in your other videos a gentle terrain, I had the impression that if something happened suddenly (kid skied in front of you out of control), you wouldn't be able to react quickly without reverting to a different style of skiing.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by snowbender View Post

Guess you just have to have "better" control wherever you ski, and that's a "better" skill, isn't it? Just how "steep" you "big mountain" is?

 

 

 


If this is the way you want to ski, have at it.  Some of it looks fun.  If you wan tot win folks over, you're going to need to post some video of Tai Chi skiing that doesn't look like you aren't in control or struggling.
 

post #461 of 492

Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz go_quote.gif

 

What I said was that I don't like yoursaying that your way is more advanced and better.  I never said anything about me.

 

Honestly  I have seen and skied with some great skiers and I would say they are better then you (or whoever is in that video.)  This person doesn't look graceful or efficient to me, they look like they're in a constant balance recovery state.

 

I have not seen you (or whoever is in the videos) do short turns so how can I say that you can or cannot?

 

Plus it comes off as sleazy that you come back here with another screen name, deny it's you in the videos, then talk about it being you in the video.  Honesty is definitely a better way.

 

You were fooled by your own arrogance. Here's my first post when I returned, signed with taichiskiing,

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/94661/blending-movements/300#post_1231462

 

and all my statements were true, and my ski friend is identifiable by a Heavenly local, so, what so sleazy about my statements?

 

When you twist the facts to make your case, you've already lost the argument, just how honesty are you?

post #462 of 492

Quote:

Originally Posted by L&AirC go_quote.gif

Snowbender,

OK.  So you like long runs without much turning.

 

Then you post this to show that you, Aang, or whoever it is, can do steeps, and all of a sudden the long straight runs become side to side traverse.  All you did was take short radius turns and add a longer transition to it.  In the first few seconds, around 10 or 14, you'll see a skier come in to view on the right side that is taking a more direct route down the mountain and looks to be in 100% control (at least through the couple of seconds he was in the frame).  There is no flow or fluidity in the skier you are videoing.  It looked like it was a struggle.  Tai Chi is all about fluid and flowing movements with no wasted energy and 100% control.

 

Even in your other videos a gentle terrain, I had the impression that if something happened suddenly (kid skied in front of you out of control), you wouldn't be able to react quickly without reverting to a different style of skiing.

If this is the way you want to ski, have at it.  Some of it looks fun.  If you wan tot win folks over, you're going to need to post some video of Tai Chi skiing that doesn't look like you aren't in control or struggling.

 

It is called "I don't care what you think how I ski but I'm having fun" skiing,

 

 

post #463 of 492

SMJ,

If you look carefully at the "steep" video supplied, it is obvious that the skis are not flat to the slope.

If you look very carefully at any of the videos supplied, I think you will see that the turns involve tipped skis; they are just wide turns so the skis are tipped slightly.  Like many Tai Chi guys, Snowbender doesn't explain what he is doing very well in terms of any rational model.  There may be something to be said for substituting nonsense in place of a rational model for those who demand a model; at least they won't be following an inadequate model from a system with no model since the nonsense leads nowhere.  I prefer Warren's method of eschewing elaborate models of skiing methodology; at least Witherell advocated pressuring a tipped ski. 

 

PS. it's pretty much how I learned to ski early on, except I called it straight lining, not flat bording, as little tipping/turning as possible, but just enough to get you where you want to go.

post #464 of 492

snowbender, your saying "I don't care what you think" is clearly untrue - if it was true why would you be debating with us?

If you really just wanted to have fun and enjoy yourself, then why are you here advocating your "way" as the superior way?  

 

You accuse me of arrogance, but saying your way is better then some of the best skiers in the world is arrogant. 

 

Sore grapes indeed. 

 

Oh and by the way, this is my last post on this.  Enjoy your season and maybe take a lesson from the Eastern way and learn some humility and acceptance.

post #465 of 492

Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz 

snowbender, your saying "I don't care what you think" is clearly untrue - if it was true why would you be debating with us?

 

No, I'm only showing how I ski, it is you who want to debate me, to show that you "think" you know something but in reality don't.

 

If you really just wanted to have fun and enjoy yourself, then why are you here advocating your "way" as the superior way?

 

When two systems (in this case, skiing) can both do the same thing, the one does it with less requirement/resource is "better," and the one does it with move maneuvers is more "advanced," and that's only common sense.

 

You accuse me of arrogance, but saying your way is better then some of the best skiers in the world is arrogant. 

 

You said I shouldn't claim my system is better, but now you claiming their systems are better? And you haven't proven that they indeed skiing better, the arrogant is yours.

 

Sore grapes indeed. 

 

You can say that again.

 

Oh and by the way, this is my last post on this.  Enjoy your season and maybe take a lesson from the Eastern way and learn some humility and acceptance.

 

Good advise to yourself.

 

But I definitely don't care what you think, and can only prove that by removing myself from this silly interchange.  Bye bye.  

 

Silly indeed, until next time.

 

 

 

post #466 of 492

As entertaining as this is, I think it would be more entertaining if we brought back uncle crud, no make that bring back gonzostrike.

post #467 of 492

Why not bring them all back -- like the last game in "Slap Shot"

post #468 of 492

Well now we have a full boat. I was lurking until I saw TCS reincarnated. BTW, TCS the word you want is advice, not advise. For such an educated person your sure struggle with language. Anyway, I had enough of you last time around. Thank God for the Ignore function...


Edited by justanotherskipro - 7/11/10 at 11:19am
post #469 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbinder View Post

Why not bring them all back -- like the last game in "Slap Shot"



LOL.... "I thaught he was banned for life....." (great moovie, one of the best)

post #470 of 492

Snowbender, I think its kind of ok for you to think of your skiing as something you are comfortable with. However, I see very little "original" in it. Low edge angles sounds like something the gliding wedge is all about. Nothing new under the sun in other words.

 

Offcourse you need to use higher edge angles when it gets steeper or you want to turn tighter. Lets say if there is a tree in the way or annother person or a rock. Like Ghost pointed out, in the steep clip you too are using higher edge angles. In the snowboarding video the low edge angles looks more like total beginner style than anyghting that has to doo with spirituality. There might be a nice sensation but to me it looks more like something that is forced to be different. Im not impressed but dont lose your sleep over it.

 

I too invented this style to ski with my feet glued together and carving clean arcs. Its soo nice to just flow down with minimal effort. But on very easy groomers offcourse.

post #471 of 492

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

Snowbender, I think its kind of ok for you to think of your skiing as something you are comfortable with. However, I see very little "original" in it. Low edge angles sounds like something the gliding wedge is all about. Nothing new under the sun in other words.

 

Well, given that a ski's only functional parts for skiing are a base and two edges, yup, you're right, there's nothing new under the sun in skiing anymore. Nevertheless, new equipments continue to come out and the techniques continue to evolve, if you don't see these new changes, your skiing knowledge is limited. Given that the new skis are getting fatter and fatter, and more new rocker designs keep coming out, the "gliding skiing"/Flatboarding is the thing to come in this new skiing world. When you trivialize its change, then you will not learn, and your skiing will not grow.

 

Here's another way I look at the skiing—trading potential energy for kinetic energy—that is, trading elevation for speed, and vice versa, so, one of most efficient ways to utilize the potential energy is to ski like flying a glider. Skiing is my escape to flying.

 

Offcourse you need to use higher edge angles when it gets steeper or you want to turn tighter. Lets say if there is a tree in the way or annother person or a rock. Like Ghost pointed out, in the steep clip you too are using higher edge angles. In the snowboarding video the low edge angles looks more like total beginner style than anyghting that has to doo with spirituality. There might be a nice sensation but to me it looks more like something that is forced to be different. Im not impressed but dont lose your sleep over it.

 

Of course I use high edge angles on the steeps, flatboarding doesn't mean you cannot use edges (that is kind of silly insinuation), but to use the base as the main maneuver first, and edging only when needed. And even "edging" has two meaning/ways: one is "carving" edge (the conventional way) where the "force" of the edging "bite" into the snow causes it to carve; one is "slipping" edge (also known as "drifting edge" by John Clendenon) where the "force" of the edging "slip" away from where the edge and snow contacted and the ski is slipping away. The "slipping edge" complements the "carving edge" to ski the "whole" ski, thus make skiing "whole" again. I'm too not impressed with you carvers' limited carving techniques and limited interpretations [in skiing].

 

I too invented this style to ski with my feet glued together and carving clean arcs. Its soo nice to just flow down with minimal effort. But on very easy groomers offcourse.

 

Most people think that one can ski the "most difficult" or "extreme" terrain makes a good skier, but that's only a layman's view. On the difficult terrain, many of performance faults are masked by the difficult skiing, so it is better to develop the skills on easy groomers. When I have nothing better to do, I try to make a "perfect" line to improve myself,

 

 


Edited by snowbender - 7/12/10 at 8:09am
post #472 of 492

Snowbender, not a bad definition "slipping edge". People dont like it when I divide turning into two main categorizes: carving and skidding. I use the word skidding because its a translation from my own language. We dont have that many words for skidding. In english there seems to be a bunch: scarving, skidding, drifting, slipping, sliding, steering, smearing, brushing, feathering etc. Even the word carving is used for skidded turns nowadays. I have no clue to why but thats how it is. Carving I define as letting the skis run along their edges leaving two knife sharp tracks in the snow while in skidding the edges of the skis are running over the snow at a angle, I call it a "skidding angle". Recently there was loud objections to the use of the word skidding angle but that is what sets carving and skidding/slipping apart. How the ski tracks in the snow.

 

So you are right, in order to use the ski to its full potential both carving and slipping should be part of your skill quiver. Nice tracks. They dont lie. Here are mine:

 

There is a gray area: you are trying to carve but you skid. Is that skidding or is that carving? In my book that is carving as long as you are able and capable of carving. It would be something like scarving. But its not the same as people trying to carve but they skidd. Its all about how you use your skis. And your tracks are your blue print. In my video my inside ski was skidding in some places. Bad? Yes and no .

post #473 of 492

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

 

Snowbender, not a bad definition "slipping edge". People dont like it when I divide turning into two main categorizes: carving and skidding. I use the word skidding because its a translation from my own language. We dont have that many words for skidding. In english there seems to be a bunch: scarving, skidding, drifting, slipping, sliding, steering, smearing, brushing, feathering etc. Even the word carving is used for skidded turns nowadays. I have no clue to why but thats how it is. Carving I define as letting the skis run along their edges leaving two knife sharp tracks in the snow while in skidding the edges of the skis are running over the snow at a angle, I call it a "skidding angle". Recently there was loud objections to the use of the word skidding angle but that is what sets carving and skidding/slipping apart. How the ski tracks in the snow.

 

I think those terms are still skiers' jargons, but the scientific terms, which have more precise meanings, have only two: "skidding" and "slipping." Physicman may want to jump in to fill in the details, but here's my simplified explanation of what they are: Given a "pure-carve track," which depicts a "standard reference" of the curved path; if we lengthen the radius, i.e. "flatten" the turning, which can be done by moving the tips of the skis sideway/downhill, we are in "slipping," and if the turning continues, it is called "slipping-turn." On the other hand, if we "shorten" the radius, that is, "tighten" up the turning, which is done by moving the tails of skis sideway/downhill, we are in "skidding," and the turn is called "skidding turn." Most of low level parallel turns are done in the skidding turn.

 

So you are right, in order to use the ski to its full potential both carving and slipping should be part of your skill quiver. Nice tracks. They dont lie.

 

True. Thanks.

 

Here are mine:

 

 

 

There is a gray area: you are trying to carve but you skid. Is that skidding or is that carving? In my book that is carving as long as you are able and capable of carving. It would be something like scarving. But its not the same as people trying to carve but they skidd. Its all about how you use your skis. And your tracks are your blue print. In my video my inside ski was skidding in some places. Bad? Yes and no smile.gif.

 

According to your tracks, you carved on outside ski and "slipped" on inside ski, similar to my tracks, the smearing on the inside of the turning tracks is the dead giveaway, so you are in what I called "slipping-turn." (On a skidding turn track, the snow spreads pile up on the outside of the track.) To pure carve, you need more pressure on the front part of the inside ski's LTE (Little Toe-side Edge), so you still need to angulate more, and put the "force" of LTE on ahead of your little toe on the inside ski, and narrow your stance may help. Good luck.

post #474 of 492

Ok, sorry I missunderstood you. What you are saying is that slipping and skidding is like understeering and oversteering when driving a car. But what do you call it when both skis are carving? Leaving clean tracks? Also, why are you sure my inside ski was slipping and not skidding?

post #475 of 492

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

 

Ok, sorry I missunderstood you. What you are saying is that slipping and skidding is like understeering and oversteering when driving a car.

 

Yes, understeering is "slipping" and oversteering is "skidding."

 

But what do you call it when both skis are carving? Leaving clean tracks? Also, why are you sure my inside ski was slipping and not skidding?

 

I think the jargons stand for now are: if both skis carve, it is called "carving," if they leave two pencil-thin tracks while carving, it is "pure-carving."

 

On a slipping track (impression), the smearing is on the inside of the turn and the outside impression is round and clean, where on a skidding track, the opposite is true, the inside impression looks round and clean but the snow spreads are piling on the outside of the turn.

 

'later, :)

post #476 of 492

snowbender, you said earlier that my turns were slipped. Not carved. Could you point out a specific place in the video when my skis are not carving and maybe when they are if they are!

post #477 of 492

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

snowbender, you said earlier that my turns were slipped. Not carved. Could you point out a specific place in the video when my skis are not carving and maybe when they are if they are!

 

Not "slipped" but "slipped turn." Look at your tracks on each turn you'll find one thin track and one wider track, and the wider tracks are always on the inside of the turns, that ski is slipping, but the main "runner"—outside ski—is carving, i.e. still turning, so the turn is "slipping turn."

 

Gone fishing, 'later, :)

post #478 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbender View Post

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

snowbender, you said earlier that my turns were slipped. Not carved. Could you point out a specific place in the video when my skis are not carving and maybe when they are if they are!

 

Not "slipped" but "slipped turn." Look at your tracks on each turn you'll find one thin track and one wider track, and the wider tracks are always on the inside of the turns, that ski is slipping, but the main "runner"—outside ski—is carving, i.e. still turning, so the turn is "slipping turn."

 

Gone fishing, 'later, :)



Is this a slipped turn then?

 

RRTX001.jpg

post #479 of 492

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

Is this a slipped turn then?

 

500

 

No. RailRoad Tracks?

post #480 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbender View Post

Originally Posted by tdk6 go_quote.gif

Is this a slipped turn then?

 

500

 

No. RailRoad Tracks?



I thaught you said my turns were slipped?

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