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Improving my Technique - Page 2

post #31 of 38

I think I'm going with Bud on this one.  Jumping is OK like I said before, but I am bothered by TDK6' advice to "scout around" for good spots to turn.  It's good to incorporate interesting terrain features into a line and fun to jump them.  It smells like turn shopping the way TDK6 expresses it.  

 

The description of lifting the knees to effect the "hop" sounds like it could be an exaggerated edge release on a flexion.  I actually almost never "directly" teach this useful skill.  I usually prefer to set my students up to do it in bumps through absorption and keeping the skis on the snow.  I believe that PSIA would call it a "guided discovery" method.  Change the DIRT on this move and you can be in the air on every turn.  IMO this is still burning too much energy for the outcome and challenges balance unnecessarily on landing.  It can also promote pressure management issues as I have mentioned in my earlier posts.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Bud, its correct that you dont need to hop other than when it is necessary. So when is it necessary and when is it not? I think that hopping your turns is a very important skill to posess and there really is no universal rule for when to do it and when not. As with everything else it can be performed well and not so well. A good hop involves platforming over both skis. The jump should be a two footed thing. Not a sequensial jump from downhill ski to uphill ski stemming and wedging. You should also try to jump so that as much of the upward movement as possible stays in your leggs. You lift your knees. Thats why Im always scouting for good spots to initiate my jump. I also jump straight up in the direction where the trees grow. I dont want to jump downhill. I also dont want to make a very big direction change, pivot, in the air. Just enough to land on new edges and sink my skiis into the snow with determination and conviction. Its really nothing more different than keeping your skis on the ground. Its actually the exact same thing except with more refined unweighting skills. Note that it is a more advanced way of skiing that allways remaining on snow. Also note that the less you jump the more refined your unweighting skills are. It takes one to know one.

 

Its not the same for everybody but I find it helpful when I ski crudd and difficult snow conditions. In conditions like braking crust its almost impossible to ski without jumping although Im sure many here will state otherwise. The added controll aspec lies in the edge change and the initiation of the steering angle. At that point you are the most voulnerable for uneven snow.

post #32 of 38

I never said I teach hopping did I? That was an assumption on your side boyz. I simply said that I think hopping is a good skill to know and it did not bother me in the first video. I do it myself sometimes because I think it provides me with great controll when I need it. Everyone else struggling in crudd. Not me, Im soaring down the hill like I was on wings. Like an angle..... Got a bit carried away there for a second but fact is that it adds to my versatility. I dont teach it because its way too difficult for the students I ski with. I dissagree with Bud, ask any beginner on skis to hop their turns and you will see a total disaster. It takes extremly good pressure management skills, muscle controll and timing. Like I said before, its the same as having your skis on the snow. Basicly the same. Only you jump up in the air.

 

teton, so you think its bad to shop arround for good spots to turn? Strange..... There are two basic ways of skiing: 1 setting up a rhythm and stick to it and dont give a darn about the terrain (saturdy night feever) or 2 adjust your turns to the terrain and use it to your benefit (take the long way home). Especially in conditions like in the first video its a great approach IMO. Im a mogul and off pist skier at heart so I have the deepest respect for what ever stands in my way be it a tree, 30 foot drop or a bump. Or a small pile of snow.

 

For the sake of this discussion Im ready to back off a bit on my jumping advice. Probably not necessary. But I was not there so I cannot be sertain of how necessary it was. It allways looks easier from behind the keyboard....

post #33 of 38

Lots of good info in this thread. To me it looks like you are tipping a bit into the slope. Also, if you get more rotational seperation and angluation, and work on better extension to enable you to enter your turns quickly and powerfully, without jumping.

  •  
  • I agree with, bud heishman on the hopping (and most of the rest of his post), and that it is there due to inefficiencies in technique.
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I think I'm going with Bud on this one.  Jumping is OK like I said before, but I am bothered by TDK6' advice to "scout around" for good spots to turn.  It's good to incorporate interesting terrain features into a line and fun to jump them.  It smells like turn shopping the way TDK6 expresses it.  

 

The description of lifting the knees to effect the "hop" sounds like it could be an exaggerated edge release on a flexion.  I actually almost never "directly" teach this useful skill.  I usually prefer to set my students up to do it in bumps through absorption and keeping the skis on the snow.  I believe that PSIA would call it a "guided discovery" method.  Change the DIRT on this move and you can be in the air on every turn.  IMO this is still burning too much energy for the outcome and challenges balance unnecessarily on landing.  It can also promote pressure management issues as I have mentioned in my earlier posts.
 


 


In certain snow conditions I find that letting the skis catch air is way easier both skills wise and physically where letting them stay in hte snow is a tiring consuming activity.

 

With that said when TDK6 open up his statement with "on those fat skis you cant ride the sidecut" he pretty much let you know what he thinks of skiing.

 

post #35 of 38

The bump skiing in the 2nd video really demonstrates your natural terrain skiing ability.  From what I see, almost all the turns in that video are pivot turns.  You are using a combination of terrain dictated hops for edge change that are heavily facilitated by exaggerated counter rotation of you hands as you pull your hand across your body and twist your feet in the opposite direction and then ride a flat ski (wait) until you hit the next mogul sidewall. 

 

Your natural athletic ability makes up for your lack of technical turning skills and allows you to aggressively carry some speed down the run.  When you gain to much speed, you tend to hang in the turn across the fall line to dump speed.  I do like the fact that you're willing to "go for it" and commit yourself to the zipperline for several turns.

 

Basically you need to work on your technical quick carved turns on the groomed and re-invent your short swing turns.  I think this would be the quickest way for you to lose the bad habits you are consistently depending on to make you short turns in natural terrain. 

 

I'd suggest you review these 2 threads for insights if you're serious about improving your short turns and what you can do with them in natural terrain.

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89620/bumps-and-line-selection-ski-bumps-like-a-pro

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89364/nail-s-qct-s-quick-carved-turns

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


In certain snow conditions I find that letting the skis catch air is way easier both skills wise and physically where letting them stay in hte snow is a tiring consuming activity.

 

With that said when TDK6 open up his statement with "on those fat skis you cant ride the sidecut" he pretty much let you know what he thinks of skiing.

 


I was only making an observation that he had little help of his skis built in turn radius. Looked like carved turns but were not.

post #37 of 38


Quote:

Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

The bump skiing in the 2nd video really demonstrates your natural terrain skiing ability.  From what I see, almost all the turns in that video are pivot turns.  You are using a combination of terrain dictated hops for edge change that are heavily facilitated by exaggerated counter rotation of you hands as you pull your hand across your body and twist your feet in the opposite direction and then ride a flat ski (wait) until you hit the next mogul sidewall. 

 

Yes, Nail is right. More round turns with more flexing and extending involved. Ski more over the bumps. Practise on your short turns outside the bumps. Keep the movements in your legs. The threads Nail suggested for reading holds lots of useful information on this part.

post #38 of 38

say what?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 Thats why Im always scouting for good spots to initiate my jump. I also jump straight up in the direction where the trees grow. I dont want to jump downhill. I also dont want to make a very big direction change, pivot, in the air. Just enough to land on new edges and sink my skiis into the snow with determination and conviction. Its really nothing more different than keeping your skis on the ground. Its actually the exact same thing except with more refined unweighting skills.  
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