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Summer fitness

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Now that the season is over (at least for me), I am looking forward to next year. I would like to be able to do a better job on moguls and was wondering what type of training I should be working on.

 

Stats 5'7  190 lbs   Intermediate skier   Age 42

 

I dropped over 25 since last summer and my goal is to get down to 170 - 175 before December.

 

I currently go to the gym 3-5days a week concentrating on Cadio 45min plus weights 2 days a week.

 

I am just looking for a little focus, should I be looking at strenthing legs, more flexibility, endurance, or flexibilty.  I know that all of them are important but was looking for guidance for moguls.

 

thanks

mark

post #2 of 7

General answer is full body strength/stability, mobility and power, with a bit of anaerobic work.  The 45 minute cardio sessions aren't your best option. Any energy system work is better than none, but you'll see better results with shorter bouts of intervals.  Think up to 20 minutes total time doing cardio, with short bursts (20 to 120s) followed by intervals of relative rest that's at least as long as the intense interval.  

 

I wrote an article on my about training for the ski season last fall that may be helpful:

 

http://elsbethvaino.com/2009/11/want-to-get-in-shape-for-this-ski-season/

 

Elsbeth

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks,

I enjoyed your article.  Some of cardio is an eliptical that does interval training 30 sec walk 30 second sprint.  I am concentrating on keeping heart rate at 60%  I try to keep my areobic/anareobic to eliptical or bikes.  I have a  partially torn acl from 20 years ago that I try to baby (even though It has been 15 years since I had any pain).

 


Edited by mtebor - 5/30/10 at 5:21am
post #4 of 7

I have moved over to crossfit from the typical cardio/weighlifting routine. My build and genetics are such that when I do traditional weight training I get pretty thick very easily. In the past when I only hit the snow a couple times a year it wasn't a big deal to me. Now that I ski 60 plus days a year, and have other recreational goals other than floating a river, or getting drunk at the lake I needed a change.

 

Crossfit has done done that for me. In just a few weeks I have noticed a big difference. My workouts are shorter, but way more intense. I traditionally don't sweat easily, but now i'm dripping within 10 minutes. The best part is I don't have to do the cardio grind. Except on some days where I'll do 20 minutes on an elipitical just for a good warmup.

 

And you can always scale, or modify the workout to suit your needs and still do functional excersises.

post #5 of 7

Looks like you got some first rate professional advice and you'll certainly do well to follow it.

 

Here's some amateur advice informed by lots of bump days:  the more stamina you have and the stronger your core the better you'll be able to do in the bumps!

 

Have fun!

post #6 of 7

 

Hi Everyone,

I am new to the forum and this is my first post. This is what I do for the summer. bicycle road racing for the spring and summer. When September comes I start running 3 miles 3 times a week through the winter. Cyclo-Cross racing and Mt. bike riding with friends. I think the running helps with skiing bumps more then the cycling. For my cycling training I do sprints, intervals and endurance. If you ski all day you need endurance. When skiing bumps you are doing anaerobic or lactate threshold work. So I think you need both, endurance and anaerobic workouts. I use a heart monitor with the zone of 100% of lactate threshold not 80% to 90% of max heart rate. My Lactate Threshold is about 172 bpm. I should lift weights to, but I do not because of time. Family life and work get in the way.

HR Zone* - % Lactate Threshold
1 - less than 0.81
2 - 0.81-0.89
3 - 0.90-0.93
4 - 0.94-0.99
5 - 1.0-1.02
6 - 1.03-1.05
7 - more than 1.05

post #7 of 7

all good: add to this a simple, inexpensive, do at home plyo-metric workouts, get a couple bosu balls and some cones for sprints. you can use stairs for vertical leaps and step ups (especailly if you have a few bumbells around),  there's lot that you can do with bosu balls that will build endurance, speed, balance (which gets overlooked but is so important) anerobic training and good leg strenght.

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