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Too much of a ski?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hi,, some have said I am spending too much on a ski.  Would like some thoughts. 

 

I learnt to ski last season and I do blue runs. 

Once I got to blues, the rental gears just didn't work for me.  I felt I didn't have control, I was going to fast and found hard to turn, just no control and non - responsive. 

 

Went to a place and they advised me some advanced level skis which I really liked.  They were quite thin in the mid section with a turn radius of ~10m, 160 is the length of the ski. 

 

I've also tried a intermediate level all mountain ski that was suggested by a shop but I didn't like them. 

 

Should I try more ski's and ones that are cheaper?

If it takes me 2 - 3 seasons to breakeven for the price of the purhase would you rent instead each weekend? 

 

PS.  I have my own boots custom fitted.  I've also taken private lessons and with a total of 15+ days of skiing I just couldn't handle the cheaper rented skis nor the all rounder skis that I had. 

 

I don't want to buy something that does not work.  I could get something cheaper if that works.  Clearly not a gear head. 

 

 

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 19
post #3 of 19

Would be interested in what advanced skis with a 10 m sidecut in 160 you tried. But like Ghost says, yes, better skis will grow with you, as long as you take lessons on them.

 

That said, though, a lot of what you describe in the first para may be less about the level of ski than the length or stiffness. Usually rental skis have mediocre edges, so they'll want to skid more than carve, and unless you get demos (more $, higher end skis), they'll be fairly forgiving. What you describe could have been skis that were too long for you, regardless of their performance level, or just skis with a terrible tune. Can you provide any names and sizes?

post #4 of 19

Standard rental skis are horrible to ski on and should be rented to little kids and first year skiers only. If you are good enough to ride a chairlift then you should pay the extra $10 or $15 and rent performance skis. Most performance rental shops will allow you to try different skis during the day for no extra charge so this the best way to find "your ski".

post #5 of 19

The purpose of the vast majority of rental skis is to make it back to the shop in one piece, any performance is a mere coincidence. It si not so much that the skis are bad, they are but they also tend to not have a tune or were practice skis for the new shop kids. These skis also tend to have wax comparable to the amount of vermouth in the driest of martinis. 

post #6 of 19

Rayonline,

 

In my short experience, I'm talking about 7 seasons.Rent skies and boots It's ever been a big problem.  My first wish is to buy my own boots, but is't not a good idea since we have to do international flights to get on places to ski and it should be a big baggage weight problem.

 

One thing became rule on our rent experience: is to ask for the top level equipment. Last two times we got good boots and good skies, in good shape. But it can(and it will) vary from one place to another.

 

But you have, in my point of view the most importat - the boot.

For the skies, remember, you ever can change it!!!

 

I did it last time, the first one tha they was gave me was so tall. Fast, for sure, but  hard to control third days I changed for one litle bit smaller and "bingo" total control!!!!  Ok, ok not so fast ! But absolutely easiest make turns.

 

Cheers

Eduardo

 

post #7 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 These skis also tend to have wax comparable to the amount of vermouth in the driest of martinis. 

Which is where you whisper "vermouth" over the tumbler.

 

Honestly have never seen evidence of wax on a rental. Fine. But my knees find the notion of riding a practice ski for the new hires genuinely frightening.

 

Had to use an actual rental, not demo, several years ago at a small resort out west I went to on impulse. Hadn't rented in literally 30 years. Some generic Atomic beater. It was an eye opener. And not in a good way. Surprised people decide to stay in the sport starting that way...

post #8 of 19

Depending on the days you get in, performance rentals may work until you figure out what you like in a ski. When I started out, 6 seasons ago, I skipped the rentals as my first two pairs of skis were used Volkl's. They were reasonably priced (half of new) and in pretty good shape. With a tune up and regular waxing, I progressed well with them and didn't buy new skis until year 3, as at that point I was getting in 20-30 days a year and it was easy to justify the added cost. If you know what you like, look on Ebay and Craigslist.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 

Had to use an actual rental, not demo, several years ago at a small resort out west I went to on impulse. Hadn't rented in literally 30 years. Some generic Atomic beater. It was an eye opener. And not in a good way. Surprised people decide to stay in the sport starting that way...


But we all started there and we're all here today.....

Some of us more gear whore-ish than others.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

But we all started there and we're all here today.....

Some of us more gear whore-ish than others.

 

Can't stay around to figure that statement out, have to go buy some skis...
 

post #11 of 19

beyond my comprehension too 

post #12 of 19

So, looking at the other thread you started on this, you tried a Head Supershape in a 160, and then was convinced to buy an K2 Apache Raider in a 167. Right? You think you made the wrong choice? Me too.

 

Buying a "better" ski than your current level, in the expectation of advancing into it, rather than advancing out of it is a good idea overall.  Depends on what you're moving into

 

My own bias for a rapidly-advancing reasonably athletic skier is to recommend that their first purchase be a slalom-based ski. That was basically what you were looking at with the Head.  It's basically a detuned race ski.  Very short radius sidecut. Fairly stiff. Very responsive. Will reward good technique; will  punish bad technique, but not too severely. The biggest part of learning to ski well is learning to turn, control your speed, respond to differences in terrain and conditions.  A slalom ski will help you with that in spades. If you thought that you needed a "bigger" ski for a bigger mountain, my bias would be to look at a GS-based ski, but be warned that it will be stiffer still and may be a little less forgiving. You won't be turning at often, but you will carry a lot more speed. Those may not be good things at this point.  Don't worry about "all mountain" You're not going to be able to snorkle ski knee-deep powder in them, but (here's the ugly truth) at your level you won't be able to ski it anyway, no matter what ski you get,

 

All K2s are very, very  forgiving, but sacrifice responsiveness.  Some folks love them - they sell like hotcakes. But, going from the Hart to the Apache is going to be like going from a MiniCooper to a SUV. And, that's what you're experiencing. It's not your imagination.

post #13 of 19

I would suggest staying away from rental skis, and move up to the better performance skis.

 

Rental skis are muy sh*tty..

Try something like a K2 Apache Recon, Rossignol Z3/Z5, Volkl AC 20, Fischer Watea 78, Head Peak 71/76, other intermediate level performance skis, 160-170cm length, and check ski/skiing magazines for other choices..

 

If all else fails, wax your nice boots really well and try skiing on them  , no kidding!

post #14 of 19

Oh, and I forgot. Staying with the auto analogy, the rentals are like driving a mid-70's Dodge Dart..

 

You could blindfold yourself and walk into a ski shop, hand the salesman your credit card, and do better.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by goblue View Post

Oh, and I forgot. Staying with the auto analogy, the rentals are like driving a mid-70's Dodge Dart..

 

You could blindfold yourself and walk into a ski shop, hand the salesman the loose change from your couch, and do better.


Fixed it for you. 

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rayonline View Post

Went to a place and they advised me some advanced level skis which I really liked.  They were quite thin in the mid section with a turn radius of ~10m, 160 is the length of the ski. 

 

I've also tried a intermediate level all mountain ski that was suggested by a shop but I didn't like them

 

I think you answered your own question here.  Who's to say what's too advanced for you?  Why would you ski on something that feels worse, at the suggestions of the shop?  Not trying to be a smart ass, but if you've skied them and one feels better than the other, who cares what anybody at the shop says.  They haven't seen you skiing.  Go with your hunch, or listen to other good advice on this thread.  But definitely ignore the advice to go with a ski that feels worse, rather than one that feels good, but is too advanced.

post #17 of 19

After working part time for a few ski shops handing out performance rentals and demos skis I have come to the conclusion that it is almost impossible to select the correct ski based on what someone tells you about their ability or needs. Even for people who I know and have seen ski, it is difficult to figure out their exact preferences because of the subtle differences between skis and even the same ski in different lengths can ski very differently.

 

So I tell customers to take ski X first, then come back and take ski Y (or ski X in a different length) and go back and ski the same run, same line, same speed etc. so they can make a meaningful comparison.

post #18 of 19

Hi Rayonline welcome to the skiing world.

At the risk of being Mr. Obvious, I think that you have a most excellent resource to use in your search for the right ski for you.  You mentioned that you were taking lessons, if you are still in contact with your instructor you might consider asking him/her.  That person should be familiar with your ski level and the usual progression through skis that newbys like yourself (we all been there) follow.  Additionally, I have found from my ski instructor friends that they often have insights into awesome skis that may be a year or two old, which might suit you better since you will probably be changing your skis fairly often for the next couple of seasons.

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

Sorry for late reply.  Yeah I am in NZ and our ski season just started off thou still icy.  Head iSupershapes std was the ski I had, 160, 10.6m radius. 

 

The other skis I tried were all kinds but no real name even after a google search, seemed like stock rental skis, same 160 size.  Rented both off and on mountain. Various brands thou, Head something core, Rossignol Elite 160 I think they were, some Fishers.

 

Oh yeah I am 80kg and 1.75m tall.

The store suggested the All Mountain ski fo rme saying they were so much popular and very easy to ski on and v versateile, the avg person just needs one ski and do a bit of everything down the road.  I haven't skied powder but despite that I think I am a groomer even down the road, I just love the responsiveness.  I don't need that speed but want more turns, just a fun, ease cruising ski. 

 

:)


Edited by rayonline - 7/3/10 at 4:16pm
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