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BC Skis ?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Would Volkl Gotamas 183 be a decent ski to start BC with.   What would you recommend for bindings, gonna start with my Alpine boots and see how I like.   If I lose 20 lbs this summer.  Damn Maybes again.
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

Would Volkl Gotamas 183 be a decent ski to start BC with.   What would you recommend for bindings, gonna start with my Alpine boots and see how I like.   If I lose 20 lbs this summer.  Damn Maybes again.





 

you could lose weight this summer by doing AT.

183cm goat with barons would be great. Alpine boot work well as long as your skinning uphill/hiking uphill. When you start doing flatter approach via skins alpine boot and the forward lean really start to suck.

Do not get below  the  Baron, Duke for a ski that will see alot(or even some) of inbounds. Dynafits are pain inbounds, and Naxos, Freerides have tons of lateral slop in them. The new marker tour 12 might fit the bill for you but its still unproven. All touring binding I have used including the Duke will break eventually, although the Duke took about 100 days of inbounds 20 days of slack country(Ie one skin) and 15 days of hiking, on super fat long skis to break.  

So again for you Id recommend Barons so you dont screw up the ski as an inbounds ski. 
post #3 of 13
Wouldn't be my first ski choice
light is right
Carbon fiber pm gear dps etc would be my call
If your using alpine boots dynafits are a moot point , but how many days you got on dynafits BWIPA?
enough to make informed comments?
not my first choice for inbounds but they work fine.
I can't believe I ruined my wifes skis
that new marker could be good but I'm leary of that leather throw attacthment and the heel risers suck
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post

Wouldn't be my first ski choice
light is right
Carbon fiber pm gear dps etc would be my call
If your using alpine boots dynafits are a moot point , but how many days you got on dynafits BWIPA?
enough to make informed comments?
not my first choice for inbounds but they work fine.
I can't believe I ruined my wifes skis
that new marker could be good but I'm leary of that leather throw attacthment and the heel risers suck
 

borrowed them for about half dozen 100 percent BC days. They work great there, but the forward lean of the Dynafit compatible boots doesnt work for me skiing all day off lifts. It way to upright and the boots are soft, although I am sure some of the new dynafit boots are burly and have alpine like forward lean.  

I do agree it the way to go for 100 percent BC, but me personally wouldnt use them inbounds. If you do, you have more patient than me. The dynafits at least have less lateral slop than the Naxos/freerides.
post #5 of 13
definately a bit of a learning dynafiddle curve but once your in right there good. the brakes are marginal though.
With the exception of the salomon quest debaccle the boots keep getting better and better
Zuuess work great for me but I haven't used an alpine boot in years and couldn't imagine not having vibram soles
Ive got a couple rigs w/ dyna duke plates and aside from the added stack height they're good at adding versitility to your quiver
guys I was touring w/ Sun. had a hell of a time breaking trail once the snow got wet their dukes were caking up under foot and clearing them was difficult.My experiences with dynafit warrunties have been awesome not so much w/ marker.
unless your a big meat hucker  or need a +12 din no reason not to ride them in bounds.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post

definately a bit of a learning dynafiddle curve but once your in right there good. the brakes are marginal though.
With the exception of the salomon quest debaccle the boots keep getting better and better
Zuuess work great for me but I haven't used an alpine boot in years and couldn't imagine not having vibram soles
Ive got a couple rigs w/ dyna duke plates and aside from the added stack height they're good at adding versitility to your quiver
guys I was touring w/ Sun. had a hell of a time breaking trail once the snow got wet their dukes were caking up under foot and clearing them was difficult.My experiences with dynafit warrunties have been awesome not so much w/ marker.
unless your a big meat hucker  or need a +12 din no reason not to ride them in bounds.

I agree with snow caked up thing, pain in the butt after skinning especailly on the east coast.

I am not a big meat hucker or ride DIN much over 12 and I still loosened up a pair of Dukes after a couple years of use. but I broke naxos after about 30 days.  I ski hard but not exceeding so like I know that some people from the other board do.

I am getting some dynafit next year and mounting them on some blizzard slider plates. Curious what boots should I get? 
post #7 of 13
Whatever fits your foot well and has the features you want and in your price range
I skied the scarpa denalis for years would go down to the bd swap in the fall and buy a new /slightly used demo pair cheap.
I was surprised when the snookums didn't fit my foot likewise for the factors and garmonts never fit me well I got some zzues cheap
on a dyna group buy we organized
rode em for +200 days when the  buckles ripped out i was pleasently pleased when the warruntied them new liners and all in under 10 days.
That is the kind of customer service that gains you customers for life at least for me. Try the zuess or titan good forward lean imo
i'm sure most of them will come out w/ a new super sickly stiff model for next season but now is the time to buy from a price standpoint
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thankyou.  
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

I am getting some dynafit next year and mounting them on some blizzard slider plates. Curious what boots should I get? 

If you like a burly boot the two burliest tech-compatible on the market 09-10 were the BD Factor and the Dynafit Titan.  Go for fit.  Scarpa's big tech-fitting boot, the Skookum, is softer than those two.  I confess to know knowing much about Garmont's AT bigger boots.  

There may be a bigger selection of burly Dynafit-compatible boots out next year like the Dalbello Virus which looks interesting (look it up on wildsnow.com).  Looks like Salomon's cratered.  

To the OP, the Goats will work but you might want something lighter.  Fritschi Eagles or Freeride Plus' would be a good choice for bindings if you want to use your Alpine boots and save some weight.  You can use Marker Barons or Dukes, but they kind of suck to tour in for any distance. and they're heavy.  
post #10 of 13
Quote:
To the OP, the Goats will work but you might want something lighter.  Fritschi Eagles or Freeride Plus' would be a good choice for bindings if you want to use your Alpine boots and save some weight.  You can use Marker Barons or Dukes, but they kind of suck to tour in for any distance. and they're heavy.

Pete,
I agree with Bob L. on this.  I have been touring on Fritschis for years.  Broke my original pair making a dumb move on a switchback.  Warranty replaced them with Freerides.  I don't put in the BC miles that SFB, or Bob L. do, but if I did, or had it to do over again I would go Dynafit all the way.  I do like the Fritschis for ease of use.  The climbing platform has 4 different heights that can be changed with the tip of your ski pole without even bending over.  I never use my Fritschis for inbounds skiing.  I also have some Barons that are in Alpine mode 95% of the time & ski them from the lifts 99.9% of the time.  They are a pain in the ass for touring but work with patience, just not too well.  For you I would recommend Fritschis.  You can use them with your Alpine boots (I do this occasionally) until you decide what AT boots fit your feet & needs. 

Quote:
Whatever fits your foot well and has the features you want and in your price range

^Wiser words were never spoken^

As far a boots I am presently in a pair of old Nordica AT boots that I stuck some old Lange race liners in.  They are comfortable & my feet aren't screaming at me all day.  Their lack of performance equals the bindings, so it's a good balance .  I purchased some Garmont Endorphins a couple of years ago, thinking I could use the interchangeable sole in my alpine bindings to give my feet a rest from my stiff race boots once in awhile.  Turns out they don't fit my feet so well.  27 Mondo if anyone is interested.  They are brand new & I will meet or beat the lowest price you can show me to get them out of my closet.  Technica/Lowa makes an overlap AT boot that fits my foot really well, but they are pretty soft.

As for skis, my Fritschis are mounted on a pair of Scott Missions.  Versatile ski & pretty light.  If it is deep powder I use the Barons with my Alpine boots mounted on a pair of K2 Anti-piste's, actually a telemark ski but similar to this years K2 Coomback.  Bottom line is lighter is better as long as you like the ski.  SFB's suggestion of carbon fiber is good, or Goode but they are expensive.

JF
post #11 of 13
 To quote one of our ski partners around here:

"Dynafits are like a good woman... fussy but worth it."

If you're inbounds you aren't taking them on and off anyway, and I hope you're not repeatedly blowing skis, so the fiddliness shouldn't be an issue.

I've never skied them inbounds, though, so don't know what they'd do when faced with bumps.  

One of my ski partners uses a pair of Goats for his go-to skis, but he's a big strong guy with a lot of BC experience.  Me - I'm a wimp and I'm into lighter-weight skis because I don't want to push heavy stuff uphill.  If you can find something that's relatively light and not a noodle under your feet you're golden.

This thread over on T-tips is a pretty good discussion re: appropriate BC skis.  

http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=62998&start=0

I've been skiing 87mm underfoot for several years... just upgraded to a pair of Gotbacks (102mm underfoot, rockered tip) and love the switch.  I'm keeping my 87mm T-Rocks for corn days, mostly because that's what my crampons fit and the fatter/rockered skies are overkill.  But the Gotbacks will be the new go-to midwinter ski.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountaingirl1961 View Post

 To quote one of our ski partners around here:

"Dynafits are like a good woman... fussy but worth it."

If you're inbounds you aren't taking them on and off anyway, and I hope you're not repeatedly blowing skis, so the fiddliness shouldn't be an issue.

I've never skied them inbounds, though, so don't know what they'd do when faced with bumps.  

One of my ski partners uses a pair of Goats for his go-to skis, but he's a big strong guy with a lot of BC experience.  Me - I'm a wimp and I'm into lighter-weight skis because I don't want to push heavy stuff uphill.  If you can find something that's relatively light and not a noodle under your feet you're golden.

This thread over on T-tips is a pretty good discussion re: appropriate BC skis.  

http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=62998&start=0

I've been skiing 87mm underfoot for several years... just upgraded to a pair of Gotbacks (102mm underfoot, rockered tip) and love the switch.  I'm keeping my 87mm T-Rocks for corn days, mostly because that's what my crampons fit and the fatter/rockered skies are overkill.  But the Gotbacks will be the new go-to midwinter ski.

if you ski where there is a TRAM/Gondi than yes you are taking them off an on all day long.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




if you ski where there is a TRAM/Gondi than yes you are taking them off an on all day long.
Fair enough.  ;)  You can tell how much time I spend inbounds.

That said, the only time they're really annoying is when there's a lot of powder/ice that builds up in the binding and/or binding/boot interface.  You just have to be diligent about getting it out to make sure you're clicked in securely.  Other than that, they're a lot like clipless pedals on your bike - you get used to them and they become more intuitive over time.

If I am going skiing on a day when I figure I'll be in and out of my bindings all day, like when I'm going cat skiing, I'll use my Havocs with the Fritche Freeride bindings.  They're just easier.  Whether or not I'd go with the Freerides on a one-ski-quiver setup would depend a lot on my anticipated usage patterns.

For me, I keep a pair of alpine skis and boots for inbounds days, but have been known to use the Havoc setup inbounds.  It's a very workable setup.  These days, however, if I were going one-ski-quiver it'd be Dynafits all the way.  I'm probably 95% backcountry and they're just that much better than the Freerides in that environment.
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