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What makes YOU a skier? - Page 2

post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 some quotes from the best

"there is nothing better than sliding on snow, flying though the air"

Shane McConkey

"skiing is the best way to waste a day that has ever been invented"

Glenn Plake

"When I go out I become more alive, its probably the endorphins that everyone talks about, I guess the more your produce, the more you want and so I think I have been producing alot of along time. I just love skiing. I love the gravitional pull."

Doug Coombs

There's a reason these guys are (were) skiers, not authors.
post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post




There's a reason these guys are (were) skiers, not authors.

 

Enlighten us oh literary one.
post #33 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post



What makes me a skier is, that my thoughts are always with the snow, even while I am enduring the misery of warm summer nights. When I see a steep hillside, I imagine what it would ski like.

Always. I look at a cloudy skies and all i see are lines to ski. Right now i'm sitting here fooling around on the internets instead of working but as i type I can feel soft sweet spring snow under my feet, i can alomost hear the big white wave landing behind me; when i walk to the car to go home tonite i'll feel myself sinking into the lite deep pow, coldness creeping up my legs, chill on my knees, pow on my chest blowing over my shoulders oh shite help me i can't see, i cant' breathe......................................
post #34 of 61
8b2a9996_blueknob21feb10%20058[1].jpg
jimmy's brain fried from too much powder
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post




Always. I look at a cloudy skies and all i see are lines to ski. Right now i'm sitting here fooling around on the internets instead of working but as i type I can feel soft sweet spring snow under my feet, i can alomost hear the big white wave landing behind me; when i walk to the car to go home tonite i'll feel myself sinking into the lite deep pow, coldness creeping up my legs, chill on my knees, pow on my chest blowing over my shoulders oh shite help me i can't see, i cant' breathe......................................
 
post #35 of 61
 Playing in the snow, horsing around like a kid.

Love the ice cold crispness of winter, the southern states & complainers don't know what they're missing.

All winter sports/activities are awesome!
post #36 of 61
 It hurts my feet and legs and makes me feel about 100 years old. My father made me do it. He qualified me to use the Tbar during a blizzard when the ski area was closed. It wasn't my idea. I don't feel the pain too much while I'm actually skiing. I don't actually ski much, preferring the virtual experience.
post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Enlighten us oh literary one.

Yeah. Sorry. That was a bit snooty in retrospect. I guess I felt that a bunch of us have already done a lot better than "I just love skiing" (Plake), and wanted us to give credit to ourselves for a change. We may not be able to ski as well as those legends, but we shouldn't blithely praise them for being notably articulate or evocative just because they may be our ski heros.
post #38 of 61

So many things. But in the end, I feel better after a day of skiing than after a day of anything else.
David

post #39 of 61
When a baby can crawl, they crawl because they can go.  And they are happy.  When a toddler can walk, they walk because they can go somewhere.  And they are happy.  I ski because I can go in a way (x-country, alpine, or tele) and in the environment that makes me, for whatever reason, happy.
post #40 of 61
If skiing is something you do, you ski. If skiing is who you are, you're a skier. 
post #41 of 61
There are not many sports that you can go out as a first time beginner and be totally rotten and yet have the time of your life playing in the snow. The sport does not require great skill in order to have a great time.
post #42 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

If skiing is something you do, you ski. If skiing is who you are, you're a skier. 
 

OK, clearly I'm not a skier. If I do it less than a dozen times a year, do I even ski? It's not something I do often.

For a ski teacher you set the bar high. I guess you've found a niche helping rich people think they are skiers.
post #43 of 61
chill_pill.jpg

I'm sure you're a skier, T-Rod. 
post #44 of 61
I quit my job and moved to CO so I could ski on my weekends.  I turn down promotions at work if the new schedule would interfere with my skiing - I don't even ask about the salary.
post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

For a ski teacher you set the bar high. I guess you've found a niche helping rich people think they are skiers.

Don't see the need for such hostility. Whatever ski instructors do to get their pay check (& tips), it's none of our business.

Whether rich people "think" they're skier or not is irrelavent. I doubt "rich people" care as much about that lable as many here. Frankly, if someone is rich enough, he/she already got their own identity, defined by money. They don't need no stinking lable as "skier" (a.k.a. loser in money terms). Skiing is most likely just things they do to show how much money they can afford to waste!. ;-)
post #46 of 61
It's May 4. 20F Clear,Calm, 7" of new Snow and 141" base. That's why I'm a Skier,woo-hoo.
post #47 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

When a baby can crawl, they crawl because they can go.  And they are happy.  When a toddler can walk, they walk because they can go somewhere.  And they are happy.  I ski because I can go in a way (x-country, alpine, or tele) and in the environment that makes me, for whatever reason, happy.
 
As far as I see it this is the closest explanation for all of us.
We didn't start out going 60mph and we didn't start out doing 5 g turns and dropping into.... and skiing trees. We all started going down or trying to go down a modest hill falling on out keesters totally out of what we know as in control. No matter what our level ,something has drawn us to go out again and again . Drive through snow storms, find cash for tow tickets and equipment, make excuses why we cant go to a family function and go skiing. There is a feeling of accomplishment and excitement no matter what ones level , to say your not a skier because you cant get out alot or dont have the same skill set as someone else isn't true, its all about a want to be there, if you have a want you are
post #48 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

chill_pill.jpg

I'm sure you're a skier, T-Rod. 
 

Reminds of a time years ago when I made some parallel turns and a friend who was following said "Hey, you're pretty good, why don't you ski?" To him, a level two PSIA cert., skiing meant fixed heel. I'm not a skier, I'm a telemarker. (Don't worry, I won't call while you're having dinner.)

When I lived in Florida a skier was someone who could slalom (which means skiing on one ski). I never met that standard either, at least not on water...

at-nyc, you're right. The hostility was uncalled for. I was drunk and jealous when I wrote that. The success of programs like EpicSki's ESA proves that there are a lot of people with disposable income who do want to ski like Nolo. (I want to ski like Nolo too ). I just felt it was a bit much for her to suggest that skiing must define you before you can be a skier.

Thanks, Old Boot. If I never ski again, I will still think of myself as a skier. I had a friend who was always talking about moving to Boulder and becoming an accomplished Telemark skier. It was a dream of his. I took him to the local hill once where he rented an alpine set-up. He did significantly worse than the average beginner. But I think he is a skier because as you say "he wanted to be there." Perhaps that's setting the bar too low. I don't know.

I tried to teach him the basics at the foot of the hill as I have done with many new skiers. He never really got to the point where I thought he was ready to ride the lift and I guess I got a little frustrated, so we worked on skiing uphill, sidestep and herringbone which he was much better at, a bike messenger with legs of steel. We worked our way to a flat area half way up the hill and practiced some of the stuff we had worked on at the base. Eventually we decided to push for the summit (just 500 vert feet above the base). He struggled coming down but made it in one piece.

Of the thousands who visit Ski Liberty, he was one of the very few who skied up the mountain. I think he's more of a skier than most of those thousands of visitors, even though he only went skiing once and struggled with it. He did move out west and I lost contact with him. Maybe he rips now but I doubt it. Last I heard, (rumors on the street), was that he was living in a homeless shelter in Albuquerque.
post #49 of 61
Quote:
 I just felt it was a bit much for her to suggest that skiing must define you before you can be a skier.
No, but it has to be how you define yourself. 
post #50 of 61
The hostility was uncalled for. I was drunk and jealous when I wrote that.....oh the drama of Internet skiing.
post #51 of 61
Rub it in slider.  I hope you had fun today. Not.
post #52 of 61
I am a skier. There are way too many reasons for anyone to read.

 

Summary:   Almost Opposites.

When I stand on top of a hill, there is only one determining factor that is going to get me down that hiill - Me and my own motor.  This fact separates skiing from most other sports that rely on others one way or another.  Not so with skiing. No one else is going to pick my line, overcome my reluctance, fear, control  my direction, speed or the  thrill  or dread of the decent.  No one is going to do it for you - you're on your own.  Skiing imparts to me a sense of; accomplishment, the thrill of speed, floods my senses with exhiliaration.

On the other or opposite side of doing things on your own, some of my very best people experiences have come through skiing. Friendships that last a life time.

post #53 of 61
For me it's the solitude and the peacefulness. As a patroller I have the luxury of being on the hill before the resort opens when you get to sample the goods alone (even if it means doing it with a bunch of poles over your shoulder and a drill in one hand!) Sweep at the end of the day as the sun goes down and you are skiing through the red barked snow gums can be very special.

I believe it was Lito that said that skiing was "dancing with the mountain" and you can dance without self conciousness and possibly even get some applause from your ski buddies. My wife is my best ski buddy and we get to experience some really great times in some really great places which we probably would not have experience if we didn't ski. 
post #54 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilyem013 View Post

Lets face it... when most of us see those first few flakes of snow falling late in the fall an automatic switch goes off in the brain directing our thoughts from warm summer nights into cold days filled with powder and treelines. I know it happens to me. We all brave the frigid temperatures, the sore knees, and the crowds at the lift...but why? What drives your passion to ski? Is it the freedom? The views? What makes YOU go out there? I'd love to hear!
I ski.  That's what makes me a skier, but why do I ski?  That's a harder question.

I think the reasons have changed slightly over the years, but it's all tied into my reptile brain.  

Originally it was pure and simply an adrenaline rush.  Now it also includes control.   Like the add says, "Power is nothing without control."  Well maybe not nothing, but control sure adds to it.  The natural urge to have power and contol is a survival instinct.  As we get better at skiing we get reinforced by that control.

Early on it was just the rush of straight lining a steep.  Now, the adrenaline rush is still there, but with the control factored in.  There are vividly remembered transitions that just worked perfectly (at least that's how I remember them ) or turns just barely made with edges digging in and gripping the turn where a slip would have been disastrous ( I can still see the texture on that rock face poking through the snow my elbow was almost scraping on the inside as I made a turn to stay out of the woods), and other vividly remembered ones where terrain was tame but speed was high and everything just clicked.  I love the experience of having things come together in what seems like a super sensory state of mind.  It is experiencing life in full volume, no loss, high gain, High definition 3D,  surround sound, Ultra Reality.  It happens to me in skiing, high-speed driving/biking, and fighting, and occasionally while sparing.  It's not just that exciting things are happening; it's that I am controlling them too.  I once had a similar experience where I somehow fell victim to some sort of spell where all I could do was watch in slow motion as I got hit.  That wasn't as much fun.  I eventually put things together in my head so that the next time I was watching myself I acted, with much better results.

EDITED: to point out that the extreme examples noted above are rare highlights.  The majority of the skiing has power and control, but on more normal level.  Though not extraordinary in volume these normal skiing experiences make up for it in quantity.  Ordinary skiing in control reinforces the control and feeds the addiction.
Edited by Ghost - 5/4/10 at 7:31pm
post #55 of 61
I've recognized that deep inside of me, I'm a mountain explorer.    I could never own a season pass.  While I'm ga-ga about skiing in the winter, I'm pretty big on mountain hiking in the summer.   I love trying new places.  I've skied 55 unique areas in my lifetime and hope to close out all the New England lift-served areas in a few more years. 

I'm too old to have an axe to grind or the need to show-off any more.  It's about the experience, about being there.   I'd much rather be on a lonesome trail than in the lodge.  For me, it's really  only about being up on the mountain.

Powder is more a love affair every year, since as a predominantly east-coast skier it's  rare.  That's what keeps the magic in it.  The hunt, the rush, the explore.

In the final analysis skiing is nothing more than playing in the snow.  It's sure beats being serious about life all the time!
post #56 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post




.
 I guess you've found a niche helping rich people think they are skiers.

LOL, don't worry tele I thought that was pretty funny actually. 
post #57 of 61
There are "skiers," and "people who ski."  If you are a skier, you know the difference.
post #58 of 61
ceb65e9d_blueknob21feb10%20094[1].jpg

This guy sometimes poses as a skier, but is really a snowboarder

post #59 of 61
Why do I ski? Deep down, I'm a perfectionist.  As someone who always wants to do things perfectly, sports like golf (the ball's just sitting here waiting to be hit for crying out loud) and tennis are too frustrating. For me, while my skiing is far from perfect, it is the only sport where you can work to attain "perfection" while having fun, even with the knowledge that I'll never achieve an unachievable goal.

Mike
post #60 of 61



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by billskis View Post

I've recognized that deep inside of me, I'm a mountain explorer.    I could never own a season pass.  While I'm ga-ga about skiing in the winter, I'm pretty big on mountain hiking in the summer.   I love trying new places.  I've skied 55 unique areas in my lifetime and hope to close out all the New England lift-served areas in a few more years. 

I'm too old to have an axe to grind or the need to show-off any more.  It's about the experience, about being there.   I'd much rather be on a lonesome trail than in the lodge.  For me, it's really  only about being up on the mountain.

Powder is more a love affair every year, since as a predominantly east-coast skier it's  rare.  That's what keeps the magic in it. 

In the final analysis skiing is nothing more than playing in the snow.  It's sure beats being serious about life all the time!
 


Nice thoughts and I certainly concur and identify with your viewpoint.
 

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