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How do you like the 2009-2010 Rossi FKS?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I've been looking into the FKS 140 and I was wondering how they are. Does it feel any different to have the turntable heel as opposed to the heel on most bindings? Anyone have these on Watea 94s?
post #2 of 25
 Dude-  Rossi/Look 120/140 are all outstanding bindings, Pivot/FKS or PX/Axial, they all work, and work very well, and are considered by many the best in the business.  If you bought them, mount them on your new skis and enjoy.  
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ik I'm just wondering how the turntable feels. Different, same, better, worse?
post #4 of 25
I have the older FKS155 on my skis and they feel great! The short mounting footprint means a smooth, even flex over the whole ski. And for a chunky metal design they feel light on your feet because the weight is more centered on your foot. To say that they have a huge fan base is a big understatement, when the news hit that the turntables would become obsolete the prices went up as people started hoarding them. This binding is to the best of my knowledge the first piece of ski hardware which had to be re-released because of the huge reaction from users when the manufacturer tried to stop producing them.
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Stratford-Jones View Post

Ik I'm just wondering how the turntable feels. Different, same, better, worse?

Different than what? Your question suggests to me that you don't ski often enough to feel any difference that might exist between them and any other binding. I expect that there isn't a different sensation so much as people just think the turntable is "cool" looking.

I'm sure they feel like your heel is clamped down to the ski, if they didn't feel solid, they wouldn't have inspired the loyalty they have among those who whined when they went out of production a couple years back.

edit: Harrumph, harrumph!
Edited by volantaddict - 4/21/10 at 11:34pm
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post




Different than what? Your question suggests to me that you don't ski often enough to feel any difference that might exist between them and any other binding. I expect that there isn't a different sensation so much as people just think the turntable is "cool" looking.

I'm sure they feel like your heel is clamped down to the ski, if they didn't feel solid, they wouldn't have inspired the loyalty they have among those who whined when they went out of production a couple years back.

edit: Harrumph, harrumph!
 
^^^^^ Oh yeah, and they are a touch vaguer when you get in. More of a Frenchy thonk than a Germanic click. That actually means they're really bad bindings, and you should get some nice Marker 11.0's with the Biometric toe instead. 
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
If u guys are done being douchebags u could read my original question and give me a real answer. Yes I can feel a difference between bindings but like my first post says I'm wondering whether or not people notice a difference between a turntable heel like the FKS or a traditional heel. Obviously the majority of bindings don't have this kind of heel.

Thanks kiwiski
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know what the warranty on the FKS is? getboards.com says Rossi gives 5 year warrantys on all 2009/2010 bindings, but everywhere else I've looked says 1 year. I can't find anything on the Rossi website
post #9 of 25
Sean, if that's your name, the typical skier who asks advice about gear tends to limit his/her questions to a few posts that progressively focus in on a particular issue. Usually they get a free pass for a few posts, and then they're encouraged to do their own searching instead of asking us to educate them about very basic stuff. They show signs of digesting the advice.  And then they usually take a deep breath, make their purchases, and often report back on how it worked out. This isn't rocket science, and it isn't a deep human tragedy if you buy something that later on isn't perfect for your needs. In fact, it keeps ski shops in business, and us happily arguing about next season's gear. 

By contrast, you may have set an Epic record for sheer number of posts per unit time by a newbie, most of them minute questions about every possible aspect of every possible piece of gear you may purchase. Most everything you ask could be found with some searching, but apparently you think our primary function is to answer whatever pops into your mind. 

Along the way, you have tossed out an unusual number of contradictory statements, or to be charitable, an unusual number of clarifications about your ability, your desired use of the equipment, and so on. Moreover, you appear to take yourself and your needs waaay seriously. It was amusing for a while. Now you're coming across more and more like a troll, but since newbies can be fairly clueless, it's tough to differentiate. But as someone who has answered you at length, and with care, you're becoming tiresome. Moreover, your name calling just makes you sound young; maybe you're a young troll? 

Do you feel embattled now? Do you think some of us are being hard on you? Go try your approach over at TGR. You'd be flamed so hard your jammies would be smoking, and then you'd be totally ignored. As in forever. But we're more cuddly over here. All good.

So one more answer, then go away and buy your damn equipment: Yes, a turntable feels different than a non-turntable. As I said above, it is vaguer feeling on entry, and makes a different, less inflected sound as it locks down. Some people find that disconcerting. Some do not. It has certain anatomical advantages in terms of leg safety. No, I won't explain, go find out. Looks are particularly elastic, which is good if you race or travel at speed through variable snow, but may not be optimal in certain slow falls in powder. No, go find out why. I do not know about the warranty, but all metal Looks will last longer than you will. Now beyond that, you just need to get a life, do your own research, buy your stuff without knowing every possible detail about it, and ski on it. THEN perhaps report back on how much you wished you had gotten those other skis. Or not. Bye.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Now beyond that, you just need to get a life, do your own research, buy your stuff without knowing every possible detail about it, and ski on it. THEN perhaps report back on how much you wished you had gotten those other skis. Or not. Bye.
Ditto...
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Most everything you ask could be found with some searching, but apparently you think our primary function is to answer whatever pops into your mind. 

Do you feel embattled now? Do you think some of us are being hard on you? Go try your approach over at TGR. You'd be flamed so hard your jammies would be smoking, and then you'd be totally ignored. As in forever. But we're more cuddly over here. All good.

Now beyond that, you just need to get a life, do your own research, buy your stuff without knowing every possible detail about it, and ski on it. THEN perhaps report back on how much you wished you had gotten those other skis. Or not. Bye.

Ditto to everything, but just had to highlight some things I want to scream.
post #12 of 25
Guys -- He's a high school student....
post #13 of 25
One thing about FKS/Look Pivot heels.
Airline handling or other rough handling can bend the arms.
Had a pair of Z7s that all of a sudden had great difficulty
popping down one binding, discovered one arm bent.
Had just flown out West.  So if flying, extra padding is
a good precaution, maybe even some foam packing
sculpted to cover the heelpieces.
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Beyond- you've been a big help and I really appreciate it. However, you can't expect to have a forum where people either ask a couple questions and leave and or become a supporter. Either set some clear guidelines or just get over that expectation. Or just require a fee for people to use the site. My amount of posts and contradictions have mostly been because I completely changed my mind about what I was buying. I came here with a simple question- help me choose between two pairs of skis- and the people on here told me I was completely going in the wrong direction which I'm glad they did. Did you really expect me to have no questions after that? I'm relatively new to skiing and knew absolutely nothing about equipment so ya I had a lot of questions, and if you think it's a crime then YOU can go somewhere else not me or else change the forum to keep people like me out. I do have a life, and I don't know how someone so dedicated to this site like yourself can claim I don't. I don't mean to offend or insult you, but you offended me so what the hell. I really don't think 49 posts in two weeks is unheard of or unnecessary. As I said before I have all of these questions because of you people who are now trying to get rid of me. With regards to what you said about doing my own research, I did for almost all of my questions. Sometimes I found answers and sometimes I didn't. However, I think this is the moust credible website there is and you should be proud of that and happy to help people not trying to get rid of someone because they don't know everything about skiing.
Furthermore, maybe I was wrong about my skill level, but none of you really know for sure. I can ski expert runs well and confidently and if that doesn't give me a good reason to classify myself as an expert then I don't know what does. I was just trying to get my questions answred as best they could. And don't think I'm the only one that's been wrong here. The guy I was arguing with in the other post was an asshole with no reason to be. Although they usually go hand in hand, skiing knowledge does not make you a better skier and vice versa. Get over yourselves. Look at the bottom of the page. Right now there are 625 people on epicski- 111 members and 514 guests. Obviously the majority of people don't take this webstie nearly as seriously as you, and I'm sure many of those guests are just as clueless as I was. If you don't wanna deal with them that's your problem and not there's so why dont YOU do something about it and go start your own little monthly-fee members-only country club ski forum where everyone knows just as much as you, and people like me can use EpicSki for its original purpose- finding the answers to our questions.
post #15 of 25
I don't know where you get the idea that anybody is trying to get rid of you.  You were invited to check out TGR simply to see a less-forgiving community, and appreciate how you are already rubbing a relatively welcoming community the wrong way.

For clarification, I'm just going to demonstrate exactly what frustrating (for whatever reason) the people you are trying to solicit info from will earn you:

/ignore
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
So one more answer, then go away and buy your damn equipment. 
Now beyond that, you just need to get a life, do your own research, buy your stuff without knowing every possible detail about it, and ski on it. THEN perhaps report back on how much you wished you had gotten those other skis. Or not. Bye.
Does that sound like he doesn't want to get rid of me? Like I said, you guys seem to be the most knowledgeable, helpful ski forum. Asking questions, no matter how many, does not in any way make me a bad person and it shouldn't annoy anybody either. Yes, I know relatively nothing about ski equipment and skiing in general, but that says nothing about my skiing ability or my character. If you were really the welcoming group you take yourselves to be, you would have no problem answering my questions. Instead you laughed at them and called me an idiot. Am I wrong or is one purpose of a forum to get your questions answered? I can post as many questions as I want and you are free to answer or not answer them. No one is forcing you to answer my questions or even look at them. If you want to completely refuse to acknowledge me I couldn't care less. I'm not going to feel like I'm annoying anyone by posting these questions because it's completely up to you to answer. If I'm really that annoying then keep your sarcastic comments to yourself and ignore me.
post #17 of 25
 OK... part of it is the time of year where we do get a little punch drunk from (what it seams like is) answering the same questions over and over. What BEyond said about comparing the FKS's to a Grif-ster is pretty accurate, teh Rossi isn't as precise stepping in and out but is a very solid feel overall. Where I have Grif-sters (Griffon and Jesters) on almost all my gear this season, it is primarily for weight over the FKS. The Jesters are much lighter than the Rossis, With most of my skis being fairly stiff, the need for the shorter mounting distance, while in theory is better, isn't needed for what and where I ski. 

There was some playful banter here and I think once you get settled in to the environment here, I think you will fit in fine. Every forum has it's own atmosphere, it is just adjusting and hopefully it will work for you. 
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks Philpug. I have a simple question and hopefully it will not annoy anyone. Sorry if it does. I know I already asked this, but I just want some clarification. I'm an advanced skier on the small side (5'7", 145 lbs), and I ski all terrain, but enjoy the trees and ungroomed runs mostly. No backcountry skiing or anything off a resort though. I think and people have told me that the Griffons or Jesters fit my needs better than the FKS since I don't need a binding that burly. If I get the Griffons or Jesters for my Watea 94s should I go with the 90mm or 110mm? I'd rather not bend the 90s, so if the 110s are fine I'd rather get those. I ski with my skis close together, but I don't see the wider bindings being a problem. Does anyone have experience with this? Could they get bent somehow if they stick out a little bit?
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Stratford-Jones View Post

Thanks Philpug. I have a simple question and hopefully it will not annoy anyone. Sorry if it does. I know I already asked this, but I just want some clarification. I'm an advanced skier on the small side (5'7", 145 lbs), and I ski all terrain, but enjoy the trees and ungroomed runs mostly. No backcountry skiing or anything off a resort though. I think and people have told me that the Griffons or Jesters fit my needs better than the FKS since I don't need a binding that burly. If I get the Griffons or Jesters for my Watea 94s should I go with the 90mm or 110mm? I'd rather not bend the 90s, so if the 110s are fine I'd rather get those. I ski with my skis close together, but I don't see the wider bindings being a problem. Does anyone have experience with this? Could they get bent somehow if they stick out a little bit?

OK.. at 145lb..the Griffon will be fine, no need to go with the Jester. The 90mm brake will be fine and might just need a tweak. The Watea 94 is a great ski for a lighter guy like you, you will like it a lot. 
 
post #20 of 25
The very reason that you don't get a solid "click" when engaging the Look series bindings is actually what make them so good at what they do. The heel does not act as a light switch, it is not either in or out. It has a large range of elastic motion, a "cammed spring" if you will that allows the boot to move and then return back to center on the ski after absorbing some of the enrgy that have the others pre releasing. This is true for both the toes and the heels and makes for what has become known as  the best retention in the binding market. It also allow most to ski them at a lower DIN setting than some of the other manufactuers products.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

The very reason that you don't get a solid "click" when engaging the Look series bindings is actually what make them so good at what they do. The heel does not act as a light switch, it is not either in or out. It has a large range of elastic motion, a "cammed spring" if you will that allows the boot to move and then return back to center on the ski after absorbing some of the enrgy that have the others pre releasing. This is true for both the toes and the heels and makes for what has become known as  the best retention in the binding market. It also allow most to ski them at a lower DIN setting than some of the other manufactuers products.

yep the FKS 140s will be my go to binding for now on for skis that will stay inbounds. DIN of 9 with no prereleasing is gold IMO.
post #22 of 25
I have tried Solomans , Markers(Duke) and Tyrolias  over the years. None of them gave me the feeling of being so locked down to my skis. A major benefit of the FKS bindings is the huge amount of shock absorption the prevents pre-release problems. I can set the bindings to a lower din setting  to protect my old grumpy knees. I have been using the turntables for ever since they came out on the early 70's. The only knee injury I got was with some Markers a long time ago. My 4 ski quiver is all FKS
post #23 of 25
IMO there is no bindings that come close to the performance of the FKS. I am one of the people who stared hoarding them when they stopped production. There is no other bindings which is very light for a solid metal construction (compare the weight to the 916), gives elasticity and short mounting foot print. I run FKS155/185's on all my skis.
post #24 of 25
I will not use Look/Rossi bindings. 

It's not that they make a bad product, I just had a bad experience on them.  So up until recently I have been exclusively a Salomon guy.
post #25 of 25
 ^^^^ Ironically, I feel the same way about Salomons, and for the same reason.  But whatever my history, agree about the "until recently," what are you looking to these days? 
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