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Skiers Edge. Is it worth it?? - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post

Two years ago I bought one for a few bucks at a consignment store and after a few minutes, figured out it was the fast way to a broken arm or worse.


I suppose. If you're drunk, hopelessly inept, or have some kind of inner ear infection. 

If you can't manage to stay upright on a Skiers Edge, you should definitely not ski.

Agree that actually skiing is the best way to get in shape for skiing, but few of us have that option.  Skiers Edge is better than nothing, and  better than any other regimen I've seen.
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




Carving that bike on an empty road will have a lot more in common with skiing movement-wise and g-force wise.  Bikes CAN be pricey, but if the goal is just a serviceable ride can be found for a couple hundred bucks.

Running slaloms on  a slight downhill with ski poles can have more in common with skiing, too.

TSE was mentioned above in the context of rehab, and there are all sorts of cool things you do in knee rehab that have specific rehab and general conditioning benefit.  But, they don't produce skiers.  For someone with very tight time constraints, or who just enjoys working out on one, it's one way to workout indoors for some aspects of ski/ride fitness, though.
 

MTB has the same varible conditions 'carving" that skiing has.  It also has line choice and some slight impact to keep you joints and bones strong. Road biking while fun is not nearly the best thing forskiing
post #33 of 47
OK, I have to chime in here!  Now yes, my wife is an athlete for the "team" (last pic)

http://www.skiersedge.com/international/masters_team.html

However, I am also a PT & a Strength/Conditioning Specialist.  I see every toy that comes along.  This is the best thing you will find to whoop your core/legs & work on your form.  The problem w/ using one is that much like the fact that most folks can't handle a slalom ski, they lack the stability/form to use TSE.  You see a lot of compensations when people hop on the machine.  If you are accustomed to sitting in the back seat & slopping your tails around, you will do the same (& worse) on TSE.  

If your serous about skiing & fitness, this is a great investment.  You don't see every national squad lugging an 80 pound toy around b/c it's trendy.  I had one in a clinic that was used for 5 years on a regular basis & still was in perfect condition. 

Yes you can use it to rail like a racer, yet anyone can benifit from the exercise.  Just as Bushwacker about lapping the crud early season at ESA!
post #34 of 47
I've got one.

I like it.

I think it works well.

It helped me to loosen up and use my legs properly.

It helped me learn to separate my upper and lower body by keeping my upper body upright as my legs moved out from side to side.  I had to concentrate on doing that on the machine.  That concentration became built in and transferred to my skiing.

I also developed a movement while on the machine to use counter while my legs went from side to side.

I recommend it for those reasons.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




MTB has the same varible conditions 'carving" that skiing has.  It also has line choice and some slight impact to keep you joints and bones strong. Road biking while fun is not nearly the best thing forskiing

Agreed in terms of specificity.  On the road bike, people looking to crosstrain should remember that they can carve turns on the bike, though -- it gets it much closer to skiing.  Likewise, singletrack = minimal crosstraining specificity for MTBing.  The crosstraining bang for buck I'd rank bmx cruiser/mtb/freeroading road bike.  Adults can find good 24" cruisers for not much, new...railing turns on asphalt with no front brake can be an experience so long as you are mindful of the safety issues. 
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

singletrack = minimal crosstraining specificity for MTBing. 

 
 

I disagree -- respectfully, as usual CT.    Leaning into a turn on an MTB while going steep downhill on winding singletrack is great cross-training for skiing.  And way more fun than being on a road or in a cement park.  Just my opinion, YMMV of course.
 
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post

I've got one.

I like it.

I think it works well.

It helped me to loosen up and use my legs properly.

It helped me learn to separate my upper and lower body by keeping my upper body upright as my legs moved out from side to side.  I had to concentrate on doing that on the machine.  That concentration became built in and transferred to my skiing.

I also developed a movement while on the machine to use counter while my legs went from side to side.

I recommend it for those reasons.

Greta point TS.  I found it was one of the most effective ingredients in helping me transition from "old school" because of that.  Not sure abo

Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

OK, I have to chime in here!  Now yes, my wife is an athlete for the "team" (last pic)

http://www.skiersedge.com/international/masters_team.html

However, I am also a PT & a Strength/Conditioning Specialist.  I see every toy that comes along.  This is the best thing you will find to whoop your core/legs & work on your form.  The problem w/ using one is that much like the fact that most folks can't handle a slalom ski, they lack the stability/form to use TSE.  You see a lot of compensations when people hop on the machine.  If you are accustomed to sitting in the back seat & slopping your tails around, you will do the same (& worse) on TSE.  

If your serous about skiing & fitness, this is a great investment.  You don't see every national squad lugging an 80 pound toy around b/c it's trendy.  I had one in a clinic that was used for 5 years on a regular basis & still was in perfect condition. 

Yes you can use it to rail like a racer, yet anyone can benifit from the exercise.  Just as Bushwacker about lapping the crud early season at ESA!
 
spot on Irip.  Crank the stiffness up and it really gives you a work out with similar intensity to driving through gates. 
post #38 of 47

The skiers-edge isn't a bad machine, but for the cost, it should be more complete (without so many options being priced a-la-carte and shouldn't be so noisy.  For a fraction of the money (especially if using the Epic Skiform discount), you can pick up a Pro Ski Simulator at www.skiform.com.  It's a more solid, complete unit that runs quietly and has been popular with European skiers for years - and finally being sold in the US.


Edited by Snowbird68 - 10/8/10 at 1:15pm
post #39 of 47

There is a huge difference between the two.  One is simply a machine with rollers and no resistance the other offers adjustable resistance where you want it.   That is why the Skier's Edge can carry the endorsement of every major ski team in the world.  And that is also why it is in the USSA Center of Excellence.  Both machines are likely far better than doing nothing (I happen to won the Skier's Edge), but there seems to be a big difference between the two.

post #40 of 47

Um...quant2325...that's NOT correct AT ALL about the Pro Ski Simulator.  We aren't supposed to review gear we haven't seen/tried...right?  Sorry man, but had to call you out on that, um, assumption.  ANYHOW..., as those who have ACTUALLY used/owned both (including members here and in other ski forums around the globe)...the Pro Ski Simulator has six resistance bands to provide variable levels of resistance, based on preference, weight, how aggressively you ski etc.  My youngest kids change the resistance band settings to match their weight and I do the same.  My youngest son started using the Pro Ski Simulator at 4 yrs and could change the settings on his own at that point.  He never would change back to my setting after finishing...but he doesn't turn off the lights around the house, or flush sometimes either.  People I've asked who have owned a SE model, then bought a Pro Ski Simulator say that while the performance differences are negligible, the main distinctions are that the PSS has a heavier construction, quieter ride and that while the PSS has fewer attachments/options, it is simple, quite effective and far, far, far less expensive....which is why I bought one too.  I can't speak at all for the SE, since I never owned one.  The comparisons I was offered were just individual opinions from folks that had owned/tried both and found the PSS a more attractive option.

As far as the logic of comparing the two, based on market share or time in the market as a demonstration of quality...well, I know Ford has a better market share of the auto industry than BMW, that McDonald's sells more beef than Ruths Chris Steakhouse and that Sam's Club/Walmart sells more parkas than Patagonia each year.  But, sometimes something really worthwhile comes along that isn't the biggest, or longest running show on Broadway, if ya know what I mean.  (After all, who really wanted to watch people pretending to be "CATS" anyhow?)

Peace.  Ask your fellow peeps here that have first hand experience.  Works great.

post #41 of 47

I have a "cheap" carbon fiber road bike, Scott CR1.  I ride 150-200 miles a week when the weather is good.  When we finally get snow on the ground, I have a Tacx Flow Ergotrainer and the bike goes on it in the basement.  I need to get the computer interface upgrade so I can race Lance to the top of Mount Ventoux.

 

I've been doing this for a couple of years and my legs are in better shape than they're been for years.  Also improved my cardio system a lot and I've made a bunch of friends that I ride with on Saturday mornings.

post #42 of 47

We bought one on craigslist for a 60% off the new price.  Got Big Mtn with all the dodads.  We have like it for getting in shape as the nights come early in the fall and it feels like it helps some with form.  Tough for the kids to use as they don't have quite enough weight.  They go pretty fast on Craigslist here, so you could try it (though make sure you don't get an older one with stationary foot beds) and sell it pretty easy if you liked it but wanted to upgrade to the newest version, or found it wasn't worth it and wanted out.. 

post #43 of 47

must of worked, it tired you out!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 I tired the new one this week at snowbird.

While difficult and actually slightly strenous it IMO has nothing to do with how you ski. Let me explain. the rep told me that movement represents retraction turns. He knew enough to say that. what he doesnt know that a properly done retraction turn does not put that much weight on your legs/muscle whenever your legs are short. Also you never have to 'push" to the side like the machine has you doing. He seemed taken back my comments that I said in person when he asked me what I thought after a couple minutes on it. sorry if your ask me what I think you get the honest answer, sales be damned. 

I hate to discredit an expensive machine that I am sure people love with out knowing of way myself to make a better machine. If you have that much money take up MTBing in the summer months and ski more. If your job that has afforded the couple grand to buy a skier's edge machine isnt allowing you time to ski. Money is nothing with out time to use it.

 
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by darent View Post

must of worked, it tired you out!

 


 


Basketball gets you in shape and tires you out, but doesn't offer sports-specific crosstraining.  Basketball is also close to free. 

 

If someone truly gets a charge out of training on a SKiers Edge or similar machine, or simply finds it convenient for an indoors workout, then while it could promote some confusion for people without good technique, yeah, it can provide some conditioning.  So can a slideboard for far cheaper, though.

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post



I disagree -- respectfully, as usual CT.    Leaning into a turn on an MTB while going steep downhill on winding singletrack is great cross-training for skiing.  And way more fun than being on a road or in a cement park.  Just my opinion, YMMV of course.
 


Technical riding skills, wherever you develop them, I definitely agree are good cross-training.  To elaborate on one part of my ranking of crosstraining benefit, when I mentioned bmx cruisers I'm not necessarily thinking about 20" bmx bikes and either cement parks or dirt jumps.  The 24" bmx cruisers can be a lot of fun just, well, cruising, whether on pavement or off.  You can take one of these into a parking lot or driveway and whip out tight slalom turns that are great crosstraining and great conditioning.  These bikes are also quite cheap -- you can get one sized for an adult with a reasonable level of performance for under $500, new.

 

For people who ride bikes for both fun and crosstraining, consider just asking your lbs if they have specifically bmx cruisers (if they understand what you mean, it's also a good sign about the shop even if they don't carry them)  and if they do, just try one for 5 minutes.  Some people immediately like the feel, and some people don't see the feel (basically, snappier and deeper turns than you can get on a road bike or even a MTB) as a big deal.  But, worth a try.

post #46 of 47



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




Technical riding skills, wherever you develop them, I definitely agree are good cross-training.  To elaborate on one part of my ranking of crosstraining benefit, when I mentioned bmx cruisers I'm not necessarily thinking about 20" bmx bikes and either cement parks or dirt jumps.  The 24" bmx cruisers can be a lot of fun just, well, cruising, whether on pavement or off.  You can take one of these into a parking lot or driveway and whip out tight slalom turns that are great crosstraining and great conditioning.  These bikes are also quite cheap -- you can get one sized for an adult with a reasonable level of performance for under $500, new.

 

For people who ride bikes for both fun and crosstraining, consider just asking your lbs if they have specifically bmx cruisers (if they understand what you mean, it's also a good sign about the shop even if they don't carry them)  and if they do, just try one for 5 minutes.  Some people immediately like the feel, and some people don't see the feel (basically, snappier and deeper turns than you can get on a road bike or even a MTB) as a big deal.  But, worth a try.


Speaking of training, Ted Ligety is doing an online set of training videos for Ski Magazine.  Well, I guess it is time to jump on and off tables...http://www.skinet.com/ski/content/training-tips-ted-ligety-week-1 , use our machines, bike, etc.

 


 

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

1x Leg Blaster = 20x air squats +
                           20x in-place lunges (10x each leg) + 
                           20x jumping lunges (10x each leg) +
                           10x squat jumps
 
"Mini Leg Blaster" = 10x air squats +
                                10x in-place lunges (10x each leg) + 
                                10x jumping lunges (10x each leg) +
                                  5x squat jumps


This is all you need. No equipment required. And very little time.



there you go.

 

you might add some frog jumps, crab jumps and bunny hops though.

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