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Getting into riding

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

SO now that skiing has been over this season for me, I am now trying to get into riding.  I actually want to try and do some of the long rides, perhaps a nice flat century ride.  My question is I can do 30-35 miles now primarily flat with some slight elevation gain 200-500 feet in about 3 hours 15 minutes.  How does one prep for a long ride, how many miles do you need to do before you can say, oh 100 miles, no prob.  Besides the actualy cycling, what are other strength training that should be done.

 

Thanks for any advice.  I wanted to do something now in the off season and think ahead until Nov 2010 start of the ski season.

Oh I have a hybrid bike, no mountain bike yet.

post #2 of 28
 100 mile ride....

general guidelines

first build up your base mileage IE use that hybrid and just go at a slow pace for 5 mile longer(starting at say 25 miles) every couple days. Take a day off whenever you need it but you should be on the bike 4-6 days a week. Id say once you can do a 50 mile ride and come back the next day do a 50 mile ride and not be totally sore a 100 mile ride would be totally doable. 

right now your only averaging 10 mph on flat which means super long 100 mile time ie 10-11 hours I know I wouldnt want to be road riding for 10+ hours straight. So along with the base mileage doing hard intervals will make it easier to go faster. IE pick a time say 4 minutes and ride as hard you can. rest while riding slower as soon as you can go again, again as hard your legs/ lungs can take it. This should hurt, how far your willing to go into the pain zone will determind how fast. how hard, and howl ong you can ride a bike. The intervals slowly build up your Vo2 max and muscle efficiency. They along with base mileage will also burn off fat. 

lastly if your talking 100 mile ride you shouldnt be thinking MTB but think road bike. there is nothing more comfortable for a 100 mile ride than properly fitted road bike.
post #3 of 28
There are lots of training programs you can find with a simple search that will get you oriented towards riding your first century; take a look at some of those.

I agree with Josh that the first task is to build your base.  I'd start by working on consistency of training.  Try to get 2-3 hour long rides during the week, along with 2 longer rides on the weekends.  Start with the weekend rides first being 2 hours, then build them to longer rides.  You need to get at least 1 long ride on the weekends.

You can do it!

For strength training, I work on cycling specific training.  For me, that's squats and lunges (with weight -- I'm currently in my "power" phase and backing off of the build phase), deadweight lifts, planks, and some uppper body work to balance my body out.

There's no doubt that Josh's advice on a road bike is good.  However, one of my staff did ride the Buffalo Classic century last fall on a MTB with tennis shoes, and finished in a bit under 6 hours (a very good time).  It can be done, but it won't be comfortable.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandita View Post

SO now that skiing has been over this season for me, I am now trying to get into riding.  I actually want to try and do some of the long rides, perhaps a nice flat century ride.  My question is I can do 30-35 miles now primarily flat with some slight elevation gain 200-500 feet in about 3 hours 15 minutes.  How does one prep for a long ride, how many miles do you need to do before you can say, oh 100 miles, no prob.  Besides the actualy cycling, what are other strength training that should be done.

 

Thanks for any advice.  I wanted to do something now in the off season and think ahead until Nov 2010 start of the ski season.

Oh I have a hybrid bike, no mountain bike yet.


To get into riding at the level you seem to be wanting to, you need the right tool for the job at hand. That means a road bike for road riding and a mountain bike for trails. Riding a hybrid bike is like using touring skis for full-on lift-served alpine skiing on hard snow one day, and nordic freestyle the next day. It can be done, but the many limitations become painfully apparent as soon as you start riding with a group of roadies or trail riders and you are unable to keep up because of your gear, if nothing else. (Yes, there are people who CAN keep up, of course, on any POS bike from a yard sale, but they are very much the superhero exceptions, not the rule.)  And you WILL want to ride with others, to help set your frame of reference for what people do, how they do it, and how fast they do it. Your learning curve will be WAY faster if you do this. Plus it's just more fun to have like-minded company sometimes.

Bushwacker's advice seems right to me (though I'm not a super-serious endurance athlete), but I would add the following: If you have the time, money, and inclination to ride both road and singletrack, then you will find that the mountain biking buys you the interval training automatically, without having to be too conscious about it. At least here in the East, it works that way, because you are frequently going 120 percent just to stay vertical on the many short, steep, often obstacle-laden hills. Moreover, mountain biking complements alpine skiing better than road biking does, as it is a much more whole-body activity that demands quick reflexes at speed over uneven and unpredictable surfaces and terrain. Road riding is much more like skate-skiing, in my opinion, in that there is more of a focus on pure cardio fitness and less on technical skills. (Others feel free to flame away here.) I like all four activities. The mountain-biking equivalent of epicski is mtbr.com. Not sure where the roadies hang out on line, as my road riding is basically training for trail riding.
post #5 of 28
 Yes, get a road bike. My wife rode a mountain bike all the way across Iowa, but that still makes as much sense as me touring in Dobermans.
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post



To get into riding at the level you seem to be wanting to, you need the right tool for the job at hand. That means a road bike for road riding and a mountain bike for trails. Riding a hybrid bike is like using touring skis for full-on lift-served alpine skiing on hard snow one day, and nordic freestyle the next day. It can be done, but the many limitations become painfully apparent as soon as you start riding with a group of roadies or trail riders and you are unable to keep up because of your gear, if nothing else. (Yes, there are people who CAN keep up, of course, on any POS bike from a yard sale, but they are very much the superhero exceptions, not the rule.)  And you WILL want to ride with others, to help set your frame of reference for what people do, how they do it, and how fast they do it. Your learning curve will be WAY faster if you do this. Plus it's just more fun to have like-minded company sometimes.

Bushwacker's advice seems right to me (though I'm not a super-serious endurance athlete), but I would add the following: If you have the time, money, and inclination to ride both road and singletrack, then you will find that the mountain biking buys you the interval training automatically, without having to be too conscious about it. At least here in the East, it works that way, because you are frequently going 120 percent just to stay vertical on the many short, steep, often obstacle-laden hills. Moreover, mountain biking complements alpine skiing better than road biking does, as it is a much more whole-body activity that demands quick reflexes at speed over uneven and unpredictable surfaces and terrain. Road riding is much more like skate-skiing, in my opinion, in that there is more of a focus on pure cardio fitness and less on technical skills. (Others feel free to flame away here.) I like all four activities. The mountain-biking equivalent of epicski is mtbr.com. Not sure where the roadies hang out on line, as my road riding is basically training for trail riding.
 

I agree that MTBing is a MUCH better cross training activity than road biking from both a physical and mental stand point.  MTBing let you pass your comfort zone all summer long and the more you pass you comfort zone the bigger it becomes. MTBing is very akin to skiing off trail.
post #7 of 28
I may have mentioned this before, but I think it's worth repeating. There is a very informative off season training article by Ned Overend, who is a legend in the cycling world. He describes how he stays fit in the off season, and how be builds up his training so he can be in peak form at the height of the season. Ned retired from pro racing back in1996, and works for Specialized full time, but still finds the time to train and race in a number of cycling events. Last summer, Ned finished second in the Mt Washington Hillclimb, beating out a handful of pro riders half his age in what is considered to be the toughest hillclimb in the world. No small feat, considering Ned is well into his fifties. He has a real common sense approach to training. Well worth reading for anyone that is interested in maintaining a year round fitness program:

http://nedoverend.com/wintertraining.html
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Yes, get a road bike. My wife rode a mountain bike all the way across Iowa, but that still makes as much sense as me touring in Dobermans.

That maybe true.  But you can't even take a road bike on a real trail. You may not be competitive, but put slicks on a good MTB and at least you'll finish.
post #9 of 28
Essentially all the plans break down to one thing:

Reasonably non-apocalyptic 100 mile rides require the sort of fitness created by riding ~100 miles a week.

You're in DC?   Join PPTC.    I think songfta on this board is one of their ride leaders.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandita View Post

 Besides the actualy cycling, what are other strength training that should be done.

 


For cycling?   None except core work.    

If you're doing weights to get leg strength, your muscle twitch will be *way too pokey slow*   for long distance riding.   

Besides,  53x11  is *plenty* of strength workout.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

...Moreover, mountain biking complements alpine skiing better than road biking does, as it is a much more whole-body activity that demands quick reflexes at speed over uneven and unpredictable surfaces and terrain. Road riding is much more like skate-skiing, in my opinion, in that there is more of a focus on pure cardio fitness and less on technical skills. (Others feel free to flame away here.)
 

Certainly not flame worthy as it is your opinion and you’re not trolling here.  But after years of riding hardtail, full suspension, 26 and 29 on everything from dusty washboard to single track scree in the Rockies or wet mossy stumps in Maine…simply; I disagree.  Give me my road bike and a clean mountain pass to prep for efficient skiing…period.  And as for whole body exercises that promote power, strength, agility and fast twitch fiber; I’ve a better focused program for that.  Ride on

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post  And as for whole body exercises that promote power, strength, agility and fast twitch fiber; I’ve a better focused program for that.
 

QFT.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

For cycling?   None except core work.    

If you're doing weights to get leg strength, your muscle twitch will be *way too pokey slow*   for long distance riding.   

Besides,  53x11  is *plenty* of strength workout.
 

I agree if it’s your job and your contract pays you heavy green.  Therefore you better damn well sit on that bike, only that bike and ride that bike cranking whatever gear necessary 365 including the cold of January when you don’t want to.  Like these guys... 


...But brother, I live in the real world working a job that does not pay me for my exceptional flexibility that Spartacus Cancellara has that allows him to keep in a world class aggressive TT aero for a quarter century at a time…yup, I missed out on that freaky genetic code. 


However it’s a matter of balance with the broad athletic interests I have that has helped me developed my program, along with diet and quality sleep, that hopefully will help me to live long and strong all the while with a smile.  My gig works for me and includes such elements as squats and plyometric explosive jumps in the same set whereas the expression of all this work results in a higher level enjoyment with all my interests…road biking included.

So, unless you’re a paid pro, don’t mimic one.  Biking alone or turning about a 53x11 will never serve your overall long term health…in fact if that’s all you did you’re accelerating potentially negative outcomes down the line.  These guys can afford programs to offset the ills of singular practice and since they have been blessed with the genetics and subsequent training that separates them from us [notice Fab’s flexibility and pedal line as he approaches you at the end of the video] all they'll do is ride and ride and ride and… .   For the rest of us amateurs we work a balanced program...whatever it is...with purpose

post #14 of 28
First of all: it's great that you're looking into some longer rides!

The prep work for them basically involves gradually building up to the distance on the bike, while working on other things like core strength off the bike.  The off-bike workouts can be in the gym, in yoga classes, in the pool, wherever - just mix it up to keep things balanced (as Don says: balance is the key).  I mention core strength in particular because it helps in so many aspects of both cycling and skiing: it provides stability and balance, and also fights against fatigue that can cause problems with sloppy pedal technique (which can lead to injury if not careful).

Don't worry about riding a hybrid on a century.  If the bike is comfortable, then use it!  Even though I have two high-end road bikes, I've ridden an on-road century on my mountain bike, running fairly fat, slick tires.  It was a bit slower than the road bikes, but quite doable.  The one bit of bike equipment I'd invest in is "clipless" pedals and good, well-fitting cycling shoes, as you'll transfer power better on the bike, which will fatigue you less over the long run.

There's a bit of an unwritten rule that says "if you can comfortably ride 75% of the distance of a goal ride, then you can ride the goal distance on the day of the big event."  I've found this to be true, more or less.  You'll want to build up to that distance and probably work on increasing your pace just a little - as noted earlier, 10+ hours in a bike seat is a lot of time in a bike seat.  Luckily, you have both plenty of time and a goal - that's a perfect start!

If you are looking into riding one of the big, organized century rides in the Mid-Atlantic, such as the Sea Gull Century, the Bay Country Century or Potomac Pedalers Touring Club's (PPTC) Historic Back Roads Century, you'll want to become familiar with riding in a group setting (this is especially true for the Sea Gull, which is known for insanely large packs of riders on its almost pancake flat course).  All of these rides take place later in the cycling season, so there's plenty of time to build up your skills.  Going on rides with a local bike club or bike shop is the best way to do this, and there are plenty of options for that. PPTC offers a lot of great rides, as do other clubs like the Reston Bike Club, Baltimore Bike Club and Oxon Hill Bike Club.  Most local shops offer group rides that'll show you the ropes, as well.

There are a lot of good guides to training for your first century available on the 'net.  Here are a few for your perusal:

http://www.blayleys.com/articles/firstcentury/index.htm
http://gtinla.wordpress.com/2009/06/07/so-you-want-to-ride-your-first-century/
http://mvillebikes.com/vBulletin/showthread.php?t=88

Additionally, David Bernstein has an older episode of his cycling podcast, The Fredcast, that covers training for your first century.  It is episode #5, and the podcast is listed in iTunes' podcast directory or can be accessed from the show's website.

Good luck!

(Full disclosure: as Comprex said, I'm a member and ride leader for PPTC [leading A-class rides - the fast ones], and also serve on its executive committee.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandita View Post

SO now that skiing has been over this season for me, I am now trying to get into riding.  I actually want to try and do some of the long rides, perhaps a nice flat century ride.  My question is I can do 30-35 miles now primarily flat with some slight elevation gain 200-500 feet in about 3 hours 15 minutes.  How does one prep for a long ride, how many miles do you need to do before you can say, oh 100 miles, no prob.  Besides the actualy cycling, what are other strength training that should be done.

 

Thanks for any advice.  I wanted to do something now in the off season and think ahead until Nov 2010 start of the ski season.

Oh I have a hybrid bike, no mountain bike yet.

post #15 of 28
I agree with songfta -- you can do it on your hybrid.  Don't let the lack of a road bike deter you from your goal -- it is very doable with a hybrid.  There's a guy who rode the BTC last year on an old StingRay, and that was 520 miles in 6 days with over 36,000 feet of climbing.  You don't have to go to those extremes.  Follow Songfta's advice.  The big thing is to get started training, and don't let yourself find excuses to quit.

I'd also just point out that strength training is part of any cyclists training program, including the pros.  And it will help you immeasurably for skiing as well.

Mike
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Yes, get a road bike. My wife rode a mountain bike all the way across Iowa, but that still makes as much sense as me touring in Dobermans.



Funny you should mention that....it's exactly what I do

On the other hand I do have several nice road bikes
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post



Certainly not flame worthy as it is your opinion and you’re not trolling here.  But after years of riding hardtail, full suspension, 26 and 29 on everything from dusty washboard to single track scree in the Rockies or wet mossy stumps in Maine…simply; I disagree.  Give me my road bike and a clean mountain pass to prep for efficient skiing…period.  And as for whole body exercises that promote power, strength, agility and fast twitch fiber; I’ve a better focused program for that.  Ride on


 


+1 
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post

...The off-bike workouts can be in the gym, in yoga classes, in the pool, wherever - just mix it up to keep things balanced...

You hit an important item for cycling as well as other athletic endeavors:

Yoga

So for the OP…per Rudi's apt post…regardless what you ride, ride miles and specific S & C program used to hit your century mark; incorporate a yoga routine [with instructor training if new to it] so you may ride more supple, efficient, stronger and longer.

Side:  That said, while I’ve been modifying a stretching/yoga routine for over 3 years to complement my strength and conditioning program, it became clearer to me after a recent bike fitting that I’ve got to re-focus and work my yoga positions to further open hip and hamstring flexibility.  Strength and power is not an issue as quads, gluts, hams, core all score well.  Its flexibility or the improvement in my ROM which is a new goal and something I’m guessing a great number of us share…unlike folks like Spartacus whose Hip flexion measures from 130 to 135 or so degrees. 

I plan to put into a post a review of Betsy and my fitting process recently completed in March.  Suffice it to say I was surprised to hear the actual degree of improvement in my ROM necessary just to address a single element of reducing spacer height by 5mm.

Interestingly, Hall of Fame QB John Elway was in a week prior to my fitting appointment at the studio.  Of course I was curious how I compared to him especially since we ride the same bike/geo and share very similar height, torso, reach and leg measurements.  Our fitting specialist is appropriately tight lipped about his clients but he did clue me in that John had a 10 degree greater Hip Flexion than mine.  Damn.  Even with bionic knees the dude can still bend it.  When my fitting specialist equated a doable 5 degree ROM improvement for me to all the variables that would change on my bike for an even more efficient position; well, Rudi nailed it with the yoga…and I’m on it  

post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks to all the posts.  Today I did 33-35 miles (unsure of the last 2 so that is why the range). This was up from 30 miles that I did last week.  I want to try and do a ride to Harper's Ferry (this is on the C and O canal) mostly flat I think.  SO I want to try this probably in July, it is 60 miles from DC. 
 

I have been doing these rides right now by myself but that is getting slightly old.  I have done the Mount Vernon trail , Capital crescent trail, and combinations of the two, also combined with other places in DC.  I will check out PPTC.  I am not quite that fast yet, I think I now average 12mph, I don't have the clip pedals, just regular pedals, so I might switch over. 

 

post #20 of 28
That's great!  Just keep at it, it will come.

Clipless pedals certainly are more efficient than riding with platform pedals or toe clips.  They do require not only changing the pedal, but also using a bike shoe or sandal.  If you decide to go that route, which I would recommend, get someone to suggest an appropriate pedal and shoe for both your anatomy and the type of riding you aspire to do.

When I started out, I used shimano SPD mountain pedals.  They were fine, but as I rode longer distances, the small size of the pedal became an issue and contributed to hot foot.  Road-specific pedals tend to have a larger contact area and are less likely to contribute to hot foot.  And depending on your pedalling stroke/technique, you may need a pedal with more float (that allows your heel to move in relationship to your toe).  So some good advice from a bike fitter may help you avoid making a mistake.

Also, you'll need to practice getting into and out of the pedals.  I can't tell you how many times I've come to a stop only to be unable to unclip.  It is a bit embarassing to be in a heap at a traffic light with all of the traffic looking at you.  Even worse is when they get out of the car to rescue you.  Some practice will minimize the experience.

Seems like you ought to look for a cycling club or group ride to join.  That'll give you some company, and presuming that you pick the right group, a set of compatible folk to ride with.  They can also provide some good advice on training or even have a training program you can join.  A good way to get motivated!

In working to achieve your goal, don't worry too much right now about your speed.  You want to instead focus on the hours of training on the bike.  Your objective is to build endurance; speed will come as you build the hours in the saddle.

Enjoy,

Mike
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandita View Post  I want to try and do a ride to Harper's Ferry (this is on the C and O canal) mostly flat I think. 

Quote:
 


SO I want to try this probably in July, it is 60 miles from DC. 

 

I have been doing these rides right now by myself but that is getting slightly old.  I have done the Mount Vernon trail , Capital crescent trail, and combinations of the two, also combined with other places in DC.  I will check out PPTC. 
 

 


I am not quite that fast yet, I think I now average 12mph, I don't have the clip pedals, just regular pedals, so I might switch over. 

 


- The trick to riding or skating to Harper's Ferry is to avoid rains.    There's a fair bit of peanut butter-type mud even 2-3 days after a soaking.     The other trick is to bring lotsa water carrying capacity - there are /not/ that many places that you can fill up near the road itself.

- PPTC have 12mph rides.

-The W&OD is a nice out and back jaunt, and if you get bored you can buck north on 15 and cross over to Purcellville then down River Road to Bradley to the Crescent.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

- PPTC have 12mph rides.

Yup, PPTC has 12mph average speed rides.  That speed is on the cusp of the C and CC ride classes (see this table for pace info), though I think you might be happier on the CC rides than the C rides - perhaps try a C ride first to test the waters, and note that there are many combined C/CC rides on the monthly ride schedule (the schedule for April is found here).  Note that as the weather gets warmer, the ride start points for weekend rides tend to stray further away from DC and other inside-the-beltway points.  PPTC's weekday rides tend to be closer in due to time constraints (they're also good rides for meeting fellow riders and arranging carpools to more far-away locales). 

The other local clubs also have rides in that pace range.  Oxon Hill Bicycle and Trail Club has plenty of rides in the C and CC categories, and their schedules for April and May are up on their website.  The same holds true for the Baltimore Bike Club, though they classify their rides by actual average speed numbers.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post



You hit an important item for cycling as well as other athletic endeavors:

Yoga

 

So for the OP…per Rudi's apt post…regardless what you ride, ride miles and specific S & C program used to hit your century mark; incorporate a yoga routine [with instructor training if new to it] so you may ride more supple, efficient, stronger and longer.

Side:  That said, while I’ve been modifying a stretching/yoga routine for over 3 years to complement my strength and conditioning program, it became clearer to me after a recent bike fitting that I’ve got to re-focus and work my yoga positions to further open hip and hamstring flexibility.  Strength and power is not an issue as quads, gluts, hams, core all score well.  Its flexibility or the improvement in my ROM which is a new goal and something I’m guessing a great number of us share…unlike folks like Spartacus whose Hip flexion measures from 130 to 135 or so degrees. 

I plan to put into a post a review of Betsy and my fitting process recently completed in March.  Suffice it to say I was surprised to hear the actual degree of improvement in my ROM necessary just to address a single element of reducing spacer height by 5mm.

Interestingly, Hall of Fame QB John Elway was in a week prior to my fitting appointment at the studio.  Of course I was curious how I compared to him especially since we ride the same bike/geo and share very similar height, torso, reach and leg measurements.  Our fitting specialist is appropriately tight lipped about his clients but he did clue me in that John had a 10 degree greater Hip Flexion than mine.  Damn.  Even with bionic knees the dude can still bend it.  When my fitting specialist equated a doable 5 degree ROM improvement for me to all the variables that would change on my bike for an even more efficient position; well, Rudi nailed it with the yoga…and I’m on it  


 

Inquiring minds would like to know the fit studio you used and if you would recommend them...I'm guessing the answer is yes from the tone of your e-mail.
post #24 of 28
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

Inquiring minds would like to know the fit studio you used and if you would recommend them...I'm guessing the answer is yes from the tone of your e-mail.
 

While there is a number of fit systems [e.g., Serotta, the Fit Kit, Retul, and Bike Fit Systems], our choice of Specialized’s 3D Advanced BG Road Fit came about for a number of reasons, most importantly, the skill, reputation and our comfort with the fitting specialist [a process of discovery identical in my mind with the selection of a ski boot/alignment pro].  I’ve been meaning to put some thoughts together regarding Betsy and my fitting experience and will post of our [positive] experience.  The specific studio that our fitting specialist works out of is located within Bike Source, the HR location [I think close to you] which is a Spec LBS [and IIRC, maybe prevents you from entering the door   ]

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post




While there is a number of fit systems [e.g., Serotta, the Fit Kit, Retul, and Bike Fit Systems], our choice of Specialized’s 3D Advanced BG Road Fit came about for a number of reasons, most importantly, the skill, reputation and our comfort with the fitting specialist [a process of discovery identical in my mind with the selection of a ski boot/alignment pro].  I’ve been meaning to put some thoughts together regarding Betsy and my fitting experience and will post of our [positive] experience.  The specific studio that our fitting specialist works out of is located within Bike Source, the HR location [I think close to you] which is a Spec LBS [and IIRC, maybe prevents you from entering the door   ]

Actually I am right next to the Bikesource on Colorado and they are moving up in my world because they are ditching Cervelo and replacing it with Orbea which is my bike of choice.    I've got nothing against Specialized other than their bikes (the ones I've ridden) don't do anything for me.  I'm sure they are nice bikes just not for me.....

I've been contemplating the Retul fit studios downtown though.....
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post



Actually I am right next to the Bikesource on Colorado and they are moving up in my world because they are ditching Cervelo and replacing it with Orbea which is my bike of choice.    I've got nothing against Specialized other than their bikes (the ones I've ridden) don't do anything for me.  I'm sure they are nice bikes just not for me.....

I've been contemplating the Retul fit studios downtown though.....

 

I don’t blame Bike Source for dropping velo.  Why should they do all the heavy lifting just to see a time bandit go mail order [or as they say at the shop…postal]

I had to laugh [as I forget what forum you describe this once before] at Spec not for you.  I agree, for the expense of bikes they better damn well do it for you.

Fitting soon for you?  Good!  Best investment post purchase…especially prior to first mile ridden on the new machine if that works out.  Retul is fine…IF…you know the fitting specialist [research and talk with others who’ve used same fitter]. 

Retul leans on technology with capture and analysis processing...and that can be pretty sexy at first glance…whereas Andy Pruitt’s BG approach focuses on getting you up on a training table to see how your body moves in space before you ever step on the bike...and that could be uncomfortable for some not familiar with a PT session.  Both have merit and either will work but for the skill and experience of that fitting specialist.  I leaned to BG because of the fitting specialist, my agreement with Pruitt’s work, products and expertise to addressing the feet and the fact the LBS is right on my Bike MUT.

A good fit working with an expert will set most riders apart.  Hope yours goes well and please post the results.  Here is a pre-stress warm up for the 3hr tour Betsy had at the studio:

fitwarmup.JPG


fitstart.JPG
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post




I had to laugh [as I forget what forum you describe this once before] at Spec not for you.  I agree, for the expense of bikes they better damn well do it for you.

It was on BikeForums and as I like to say 'it's a tool and a jewel" at today's prices so it better trip your trigger.    I'm going to get a fit it's just a matter of where right now. 
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