EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New to buying skis, looking for advice.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New to buying skis, looking for advice.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am hoping to get some advice on what type of skis / bindings and possibly boots I should be looking for.

I haven't skied much in the past decade (I used to ski quite a bit back in the early 90's) , just took the sport up again this year and have been out a half dozen times.  

Intermediate skier comfortable on blue and black runs.  I am more of a hobby skier.  I ski the trees a bit, some moguls, some jumping, mostly groomed (due to the hills around me more than choice), some powder when I get the chance.  Most of the people I go with are boarders so not looking for racing speed.

I am 5'10" and 170lbs mid 30's, not scared to do stupid stuff, and will try things just because they look fun.

Basically what I am looking for is some tips on what type of ski I should look for, the last time I went ski shopping there were straight ski's and more straight skis, the hardest choice was what length to buy.

I have only been on 2 types of skis this winter, the first are shaped skis in the 160-168 length, and some fat dual tipped ski's in the 170's.  I found that I felt more comfortable on the shaped shorter ski's but this could just be because I am just getting back into the  sport.

Should I be looking at longer ski's or shorter ski's with the type of skiing I do?
I am hoping for suggestions for an all purpose type of ski, length, etc that as I get better at skiing I will still be comfortable with for a few years.  I only want 1 pair of ski's for the next say 5 years, something that I would probably be comfortable with now and that would be good as I get hopefully even better and more advanced with my skiing.

I also no jack squat about bindings so any advice there in regards to ski type recommendations is greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 12
Would help to know more about where you ski, as in east or west, big or small mountain. But Fisher Watea 84's are nice all arounds for your likely mission, also think about Rossi Avenger 82 Carbon, and Dynastar Sultan 85's. All should be getting cheaper right now. Bindings are all about the same for your purposes, look for a 4-12 DIN from a major company with a toe that releases upward. Your main issue, though, should be boots. Go for a flex of 90-100, brand will depend on fit. Get them tight enough that your toes just touch the front of the boot when you're standing normally, have a few mm of room when you lean into a ski stance. Or use the 1 finger rule for the shells. No ankle movement. DO NOT buy them if they're all comfy like street shoes in the store, because they'll pack out in a season and get too big. 

Then go take a few lessons, hobby or not, to protect your knees when you're off in the trees with your snowboard buddies. 
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am in Alberta Canada, and mostly head out to Marmot Basin (Jasper) and Sunshine (Banff), these are both fairly big mountain resorts, I also like to hit some of the smaller hills like Powder King in British Columbia where they get fresh snow daily.  I am planning on hitting all the major hills in BC next year as I get back into the swing of skiing again.  

I would say I am above average for my skiing ability when compared to the masses who typically flood the hills, the decade away from the skis has not hampered my abilities that much but I certainly agree that some lessons again would probably be a great idea also.

What would you recommend for length of skis though? 
post #4 of 12
Probably around 170 - 180 would be a good length for u depending on the ski. However, I would get boots first and worry about skis later. Get fitted for boots including custom footbeds even though it will likely cost more. That will make a bigger difference in ur skiing than skis. Plus since u r just getting back into the sport spend the off season researching so when the season starts again u have a short list of skis to demo including different types/widths. I just came back to skiing two years ago and I am looking for skis (got fitted for boots last year) now. I wish I had been more deliberate about which skis to demo and also trying different styles/types of skis so I could get a better idea of what I like and don't like. With all that said, the sultan 85 as mentioned previously gets a lot of love in this forum and would seem like a good place to start. I have not skied them myself so I can't give personal input. In terms of other skis, probably should focus ur research on Skis in the 78 - 90ish waist range for the skiing u described. Take my suggestions with a grain of salt though since I have limited experience on different types of skis. So I'm just trying to sum up some of the things I've learned from this forum, which is a great resource. Good luck.
post #5 of 12
Custom fitted boots + footbed  first.  Flex about 100.  Expect to have to go back to the boot fitter a few times to get them punched out and the fit tweaked where needed.

Skis between 170 and 180 for Alberta/British Columbia skiing and your preferred skiing speed.  As to which ones, I'll leave that to those with  more recent experience with skis suited for skiing in your area and type of snow.

expertskiers.com has well done reviews that go back a few years.  I recommend paying the subscription fee and then finding something non-current for cheap that has a good review and characteristics matching your needs.
post #6 of 12
I pretty much agree with what has been said so far. Bindings need to have a release setting that is at least 2 numbers higher than your release setting (DIN). So if you ski on DIN 8, then your binding needs to go to at least DIN 10
post #7 of 12
I have to disagree with DanoT.  Don't even think about getting anything less than a 4-12 DIN binding.  Most of the 10 DIN bindings don't have all of the features of their 12 DIN brothers and aren't built as well and will wear out sooner or break easier.

Invest in a good 4-12 DIN binding from a reputable manufacturer.  They only cost a bit more than the 10 DIN bindings anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

I pretty much agree with what has been said so far. Bindings need to have a release setting that is at least 2 numbers higher than your release setting (DIN). So if you ski on DIN 8, then your binding needs to go to at least DIN 10
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

I pretty much agree with what has been said so far. Bindings need to have a release setting that is at least 2 numbers higher than your release setting (DIN). So if you ski on DIN 8, then your binding needs to go to at least DIN 10

alot of lower DIN binding have heels that are too high on them to ski the ski well.
post #9 of 12
It is my experience that racing bindings with higher DINS generally have more going for them than just the stronger spring.  I don't think I would go for a 10 DIN binding, just for that reason.  My Fischer WC SCs came with an FR12 (Fischer-branded Tyrolias) and they seem to work.  I have bought and been happy with Tyrolia FF17+, and have about three days on my Marker Comp 15s without any problems so far. 
post #10 of 12
BOOTS! 

Proper fitting boots are THE MOST IMPORTANT piece of ski gear you can buy.  The next time you go to Banff, stop in and see Mntlion for boots.  He will get you sorted out right.  

Once the boots are right, then you can look at skis.  Maybe something like a 168 K2 Apache Recon, but i don't know.

And I also have to disagree with DanoT.  If you run a DIN of 8, and are just getting back into the sport, a 10-DIN binding doesn't give you much room to grow as a skier.

And if you really want to grow as a skier in the Rockies, get a 173 Explosiv.  You will become a better skier.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
I appreciate all the advice.  Very helpful indeed.

So this is what I am getting from everyone:
1.  Boots are most important, custom fitted + boot liner.  Flex around 100. 
2.  Bindings DIN 4-12 go with a reputable brand.
3.  Skis, 170-180 length, with 78-90 waist.
Try to get out on some demo's first before committing to a specific ski.

Armed with a handful of recommended brand/models of ski/bindings, the Internet and hopefully some demo's I think I am ready to make sure I am very happy with a new purchase for next season.

And of course, any additional tips, etc, always appreciated. 

Thanks.
post #12 of 12
Don't discard a binding just because the DIN is higher than 12, so long as the lowest DIN on the binding is at least as low as you require.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New to buying skis, looking for advice.