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weight over fall line?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
When I turn left, I turn my ankles and knee into the hill, and my weight is over this.  How do  keep my upper body over fall line?  Any drills, helpful tips, etc?
post #2 of 7
Steve,

You're going to have to be more specific. The fall line is simply the direction of downhill (where water would flow if it was released. Your upper body is always above this line unless you are buried. Are you talking about having your upper body flow to the inside of your turns (downhill of the skis in the first part of the turn and up hill of the skis in the last part of the turn)?
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
It is too late, I am confused now.  You make a turn, and your knees and ankle turn into the hill, ie up the hill (inside), and your upper body is supposed to be over the outside ski, ie downhill (which I mistakenly called fall line)

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

Steve,

You're going to have to be more specific. The fall line is simply the direction of downhill (where water would flow if it was released. Your upper body is always above this line unless you are buried. Are you talking about having your upper body flow to the inside of your turns (downhill of the skis in the first part of the turn and up hill of the skis in the last part of the turn)?
post #4 of 7

You need to put your weight on the outside ski. This way your knees and hips will be going up hill after the fall line and your upper body the other way. Down hill. You should be able to lift the inside ski in the air. As you get better at it you start lifting the inside ski earlier in the turn to eventually be able to keep it in the air through out the whole turn after the transition. There is a drill like this where you lift the inside ski. Eventually you will be able to do these movements with both skis on the snow.

post #5 of 7
Try this steveys:

Stand up and pretend that your skiing across the hill facing South.  Flex your ankles and tip your knees and ankles West and stand so that your balancing over left foot.  Make sure that your right hand is a little higher then your left hand because we want your shoulders to tip the way the hill tips.  This should put you in a very strong and balanced position as you ski across the hill.

When it's time to turn, look where you want to go and start tipping your left foot over to the little toe side and your right foot over to the big toe side and at the same time, extend your ankles by pushing down on your toes.  You want to let your body move over your skis in the direction of your new turn.  Once your skis start pointing down the hill, start to put more weight one the new downhill foot (right foot) and let your knees and ankles tip into the hill as you did before in the traverse.

Hope this helps.
post #6 of 7
 Steve,

Try traversing across a slope (beware of skiers approaching from uphill) and ...
shuffling your feet back and forth
stepping from foot to foot (lifting the tail of the ski higher than the ski tip)
lifting the uphill ski and tapping the tip of the lifted ski onto the snow
tipping both skis into the hill to come to a stop going uphill (without turning your feet and leaving a carved ski track in the snow)
lifting the downhill ski and tapping the tip of that ski onto the snow
lifting the downhill ski and holding the tip of that ski on the snow, then tipping that ski onto its downhill edge and starting a new turn

Then you will be able to answer your own question.
post #7 of 7
After the fall line, touch your downhill hand against the side of your downhill boot.
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