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Video of Bumps in the Fog

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
This is my first attempt at videoing. It's via a digital camera, not a video camera, but it's not bad.

If anyone cares to give me some feedback (particularly with regard to PSIA-L2 standard) on these turns thru the bumps in peasoup think fog, have it--

http://users.rcn.com/kvk/IMGP0169.MOV
(click link above to view movie)

Mountain: Mt. Tremblant
Trail: Haute Tension (lifeline on The Edge)
Conditions: Very Wet Loose Snow w Fog
Date: 3/25/2004

-Ken
post #2 of 19
What bumps?
post #3 of 19
Looks like Level II skiing to me. Some good characteristics such as: continuous line, no abrupt movements, nice quiet upper body, skis stayed on the snow. Not Level III, but certainly Level II IMHO.

Couldn't really say how big the bumps were, nor how tight they are. Can you tell us more about the slope? Is it a blue or black?

Bob
post #4 of 19
Patience! Let the skis come around in the turn, instead of pushing/stepping them into the turn.

In general, though, I would say good, solid Level II skiing. I am not sure that the steepness here would qualify for Level II off-piste in RM, but you certainly used line to control speed and were very smooth.

Well done.

But, work on that patience.
post #5 of 19
I believe that would pass around here. And qualify as Level II terrain. No doubt about it, instructors at bigger mountains have to be better skiers than those of us at smaller mountains. Your greens are our blues, etc.
post #6 of 19
Actually, I was just yanking your chain. Nice, but the lower body didn't look very dynamic on bump absorption. Let the knees pump instead of the waist bend. Also, the skis could stay tighter for more quickness. Try to look more like a bump skier instead of a ski instructor....alot of instructors look like homos in the bumps.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well, I was a bump skier at 16 but didn't become a ski instructor until 38.

Badger, Please, could you use a term like 'timid', or 'wimpy'. There are a lot of people that would take offence at the term you used. I'm sure there are some people of alternative lifestyles that can rock in the bumps and some of conventional lifestyle that are wimps. Oh, I do know a lot of ski instructors that are indeed wimps about the bumps, many with shinier pins then I.

[ March 31, 2004, 11:23 AM: Message edited by: learn2turnagain ]
post #8 of 19
I don't know, Learn2T. I am not qualified to critique the level of your skiing relative to PSIA standards.

However, I give you much credit to ski so nicely on bumps that you probably couldn't even see very well. What I could sense was that the bumps were rather irregular. A big one here, a couple of little ones there, a shelf here, a drop off there. If visibility is not good, it is much tougher to see far enough ahead to plan a line, especially in irregular bumps. Therefore, it looks like you were doing a lot of reacting to the bumps as they come up rather than planning your route.
post #9 of 19
38....pretty good . Especially in that flat light.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
... alot of instructors look like homos in the bumps.
I sure hope that was a typo ... you don't want to be known as a hater, now do you?
post #11 of 19
A good run. Here's a couple things that could use a little refining:

Sometimes the poles are just flicked out with no real plant. The poling could be more assertive. This will improve your upper/lower body separation, as the firm plant will help keep the upper body from rotating.

Your shoulders could be more square to the hill -- your shoulders seem too square to the skis. Assertive poling will allow you to ski more with your legs.

There could be more knee flexion, as other posters have said. There could also be more extension as you ski downwards into the trough. Legs look a bit stiff overall, with more waist action than knee action.

The planting of the poles could be done into the face of the moguls, which will help to bend your knees more to get you into that lower more dynamic position.

Just my 2 cents.

Feel free to point out any errors, and discard anything bogus....

Cheers!
post #12 of 19
BigE....do you think a firm plant helps against rotation into the turn....or works against you by making you rotate MORE into the turn by stopping the motion of the inside shoulder. I guess it all depends on the timing. A little late and a firm plant could make things worse......think? Maybe he needs to reach downhill a little more? I think his plant actually is occuring back by the foot.
post #13 of 19
It looks like a good run.

I'd have to agree with everyone on poleplant and knees. It appears that you drop you hand after you plant, which can lead to following the skis (think about it...you drop your inside hand back, which pulls your upper body into rotation).

Legs...Try and get them to work together better. It looks like you go into a snowplow at one point, maybe for control. Absorbing more will help control and let you go faster.

A drill I'd suggest would be to try some larger-radius turns in the bumps (like carving through the mogul field)with your poles held horizontally, in both hands, ensuring that they always face down the fall line. If you're not loose and absorbing there, it's gonna be a fun ride!

But your skiing looks great, especially for 38!
post #14 of 19
D(C).....I'm going to try the big turn drill you recommend.....get the knees working first.....then add quicker turns. I remember a good bump skier telling me that there is a speed threshold you need to get past to get good....kind of like the sound barrier. Like a
motocross rider through the whoops.....get slapped around pretty good as you go faster...then things smooth out when you skim the tops....gotta get over the fear factor though..
post #15 of 19
You are brave and the video looks good. Here are a couple of things that I would suggest.

You are not going to a bump competition so I like a more finished turn. Use more of the bump where the snow is better. I like to ski around the bump, but don't ski in the trough. Complete the turn. Getting out of the trough opens up a ton more terrain and better snow.

Your pole plant is something that can easily be improved and it will help alot. The word firm has been used and that is what came to mind for me. It looks like your pole plant is too casual. Be precise, don't exagerate and keep your hands and poles up front.

Stand up - good posture.

Ski really steep terrain with tight lines. Practice skiing slowly - going where you want to go. Keep your skies in contact and stay centered. Come to Mad River and challenge yourself (when the snow is good).

You have great potential for a major break through and you have willingness. Best of luck.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
BigE....do you think a firm plant helps against rotation into the turn....or works against you by making you rotate MORE into the turn by stopping the motion of the inside shoulder. I guess it all depends on the timing. A little late and a firm plant could make things worse......think? Maybe he needs to reach downhill a little more? I think his plant actually is occuring back by the foot.
I think it helps stop the rotation, and lets the legs move independently.

You have have right idea with reaching downhill. That will get more knee flex. Given his chosen line, that reaching downhill and flexed sensation should happen on the up side of the bump.

So, a firm grip on poles assertively planted into the face of the bump would help. But IMO, the poles should also be shorter, to allow/force the deeper flexion, and still keep the hands in good position.

Using standard length poles means the hands can get too high,especially on big steep bumps. The inside shoulder may need to do something funky to avoid getting stuck -- like rotating with the skis, or shrugging upwards. When removing the pole, get it out before your hand goes behind your hips.

Just my 2 cents. Hope it's worth that much!!

Cheers!
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
alot of instructors look like homos in the bumps. [/QB]
I like that and unfortuneately it's so true!
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by learn2turnagain:
Badger, Please, could you use a term like 'timid', or 'wimpy'. There are a lot of people that would take offence at the term you used.
Gee, sounds like you were jumping to a stereotypical conclusion L2. What makes you think homosexuals are wimpy, or that Badger was implying that? :

Perhaps Badger was refering to their well coordinated outfits. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
FM, I think from context, that's what badg was trying to say; not me.
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