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Up for critique

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
3 years post break and I'm almost back to normal.  Here's me on Montana Face at Lookout Pass.   This was taken today, and it was 50 degrees out,  soft and edgeable snow, but getting thick.  Upper part was steep (well, my idea of steep).  

I still have right shin sensitivity where the break was and I can't put much pressure on the boot tongue, but it's getting better.  I have plantar fascitis in my left foot, and that hurts as well, heel and ball of foot.

 What can I expect to work on next season?  (sound off on this video, tee hee)




For comparison, I'm more relaxed on this gentle, impeccably groomed trail.
post #2 of 23
 Your right turns are better than your left....I will let the pros say what they need to say.

Man its been 3yrs already.....shit, time flies.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
It's still scary to be on skis at all.   I remember too well.  But I'm calming down. 
post #4 of 23
I'll ski with you anytime. Seems comfortable. With trouble with ankles/knees, maybe put in a built in flex to the ankle. THis will keep knees/hips forward. Ask Jeff about the "opening of the knee joint on the turns. Also, if ankle/knees are bent, it is easier to face directionally down the hill, getting edges.

But, heh, as long as you are having fun, who cares! Keep on having fun!
post #5 of 23
Hi Bonni,

It's nice to see you back in action. Technique wise it certainly looks like you're back too. The first suggestion is for off season work: get healthy. I am not a doctor, but I play one on the Internet. Massage may help the shin. I have a hand held model from Walmart that does a fantastic job on trouble spots (note - looks like what I have is no longer available and the new one is not as good - but the concept still applies). Plantar fascitis is hard to cure. I've seen all sorts of stuff to help. It's almost as bad as lower back pain - volume of recommendations wise. Give it plenty of rest. Figure out what caused it (running, shoes, etc), fix the cause and start trying cures until it's fixed. I've had it. It sucks. Get it fixed. It can be fixed over the summer.

I like the way you come straight down the fall line (staying in a corridor) in your turns. You are just a tiny bit back of centered over your skis, have a nice rhythm and a crisp accurate pole touch. Of course, your outfit is impeccable.

Can you see how your turns are almost connected straight lines? In the business, we call these Z turns. You change directions very quicky with an up move, turning of the feet (which is nice guiding BTW) and help with upper body rotation. Can you see the skidding that results? This is an effective way to ski, but it will get you tired quickly in more challenging terrain. The goal is to make rounder turns. To do this, you'll need to replace some of the rotary movements with tipping movements. The first thing I'd work on with you are tipping drills like side slip, falling leaf, tug of war (this is a static drill where one skier tries to pull the other down the hill and the other resists), Rusty 360s (2 connected on snow 180 degree turns) and fan traverses (start in a shallow traverse across the trail, turning uphill only by tipping the skis and leaving a carved track in the snow; then gradually increase the steepness of the traverse to make it more U shaped). The second thing I'd ask you to do is to use more of the width of the hill. Be more patient turning through the fall line. The fan traverses start this process and 10 toes (make sure all 10 toes are pointing straight down the hill in the middle of your turns)/ 2-4-2 (go from two edges in the snow to a flat ski/ 4edges on the snow to the other 2 edges) help to take this back into regular skiing. Eventually we'll get back to making short radius turns but for now they encourage you to cheat too much.
post #6 of 23
Hi Bonni, take notice of the comparison of your turn shape between the first and second video.  In the second, on flatter terrain, it's rather consistent from the beginning of the turn to the end.  Very nice!  On the steeper terrain of the first video see how you rush the first half of the turn.  By rush I mean you make a big up move then aggressively pivot your skis around, totally eliminating a gradual turning of the skis through the first half of the turn.  

It's very common for skiers to rush the start of their turns on steeper terrain.  It's a result of a fear of the acceleration that happens when skis are allowed to turn gradually through the first half of the turn.  To overcome this rushed pivoting at the start of the turn you have to become comfortable with the acceleration that occurs, and learn to do your speed control through the second half of the turn.  When you get comfy with it the acceleration becomes fun, like riding a roller coaster.  The first half of the turn is the downhill part of the coaster ride, and the second half of the turn is the climb back uphill.  

Learn it by doing a single long radius turn, continuing to turn until you eventually turn uphill and come to a stop.  Through the first half of the turn you should be able to count to 3 Mississippi before your skis reach the falline.  Feel the acceleration through the first half of the turn, then the gradual deceleration as you continue turning through the bottom half.  Embrace the sensation.  When you get single turns down pat, link a couple of them together by starting a new turn just before you come to a stop, and again counting off your Mississippis. Begin learning this on gentle terrain, then gradually move up to ever more steep terrain, repeating the same thing.  GarryZ can help you with it, he knows this stuff very well.  

Little Tiger says hi.  She's here now, and pointed out your thread to me.  She provided the above MA before I even got to view the videos.  She's getting pretty good at this MA stuff.  
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Exactly right, I know I don't finish my turns.   These are all excellent suggestions.  It's a slow road for me but I'll be back.
Thanks, guys.   I appreciate the comments.  This is just what I need to know.
Hi, Little Tiger!
post #8 of 23
Something that I am seeing in your turns is a good amount of upper body rotation.  Not the worlds worst thing and something that can be fixed very easily and will in turn help work on some stuff with the feet.  I know guys don't yell at me for not starting at the snow but sometimes this works out quite well to start working on the feet but I have a feeling the feet will come up often and there will be a ton of drills and things of that nature to work on. 

Something that I like to do is to isolate the upper body movements separate from the feet.  What I do is take your poles and cross them on top of you wrists (tip and handle on each hand so the poles are balanced).  Pick a nice gentle hill on a day that is not really windy since you are going to ski down the hill with out dropping your poles.  Keep your hands about where they should be if you were holding your poles like normal.  What I look for is the ability to balance the poles which means there is little to no banking involved in a turn.  The nice thing about keeping the poles out in front of you is that you can see when your poles move around at different angles and also when the poles fall out of your frame of skiing.  I usually tell my students to use this drill when ever they feel that they are out of balance or feel that there upper body is just flat out working too hard.

Something else that I personally look for is some anticipation for the next turn but that will come back as you get more comfortable with the turns again.

I hope this helps and makes sense.
Good luck
post #9 of 23
Nice to see you back on the mountain Bonnie!   You look like your in control and having a nice time.

No criticism, but Here's my take on what you could do to keep you holding onto the hill a little better:

I think you need to enjoy yourself and ski for a while and build up your courage.  After having gone through what you've gone through, it might take a while.  Once your comfortable, I'd like to see you keep your shoulders a little more in line with the slope of the hill.  When you turn, your shoulders tend to tip into the direction of the hill or incline.  Try keeping the shoulders as well as your hands tipped the same way the hill tips.  You can also achieve this by concentrating on keeping your inside (uphill) hand higher than your downhill hand.
Edited by Snowmiser - 4/5/10 at 11:19am
post #10 of 23
Maybe a comparison of older vid she has would show her progress better. She knows she isn't Suzy Chapstick but she is really getting more out of the top of her turns than before. Having the shin be an impediment is going to be a challenge but time may heal this.

 In the second vid her focus was to make nice round turns in the first it was just to ski a much steeper grade and show her skiing as what it is. Her focus there was survival.

She moves well with her skis and I like her balance at the top of her turn. She has a lot she brings to help her learn to get more out if her effort.

One step at a time. This lady had a horrible accident and her personality has helped her overcome this that might sideline any of us. that's a big  barrier she has overcome to some extent

For watching her closely she has a knock-need stance and I can see both outside edges lifted slightly when she skis. First ,some alignment for next year and then we should see what that opens .I am hopeful feeling all four of her edges will fire up a few light bulbs in her mind and lead to significant improvement coming from security and stability.


Wanna hear something I saw that was very cool ?  We did some first steps off piste and however disconcerting it was for her it also gave her a safe taste of fun to come.  A little powder and little crud and even did some tree skiing.(you gotta post that picture) Don't underestimate this woman,just give her some time . I have seen much progress in her skiing.



Rick, I don't work with her but in small segments  using the larger concepts and only when asked . We ski to have fun and it's not the right time of year to mess with her much.  She's made significant improvements at the top of her turn and is in balance to make more. Farther through the turn she needs to finish in balance. When she feels able and willing  to add some helpful movement under this umbrella of balance she will find her power.The table is set and she will continue to improve due to her  high spirit and inner strength.

About her shins. Is there a bootfitting trick we can  use to disperse the pressure on her shin so it's spread around her leg shaft off of the front of her shin some ? Flexing is painful for her and this would be very helpful to aid in her balance.
post #11 of 23
 Try not buckling the top 2 buckles.
post #12 of 23
Bonnie - wellcome back. I have as usually not read any other feedback so you will have my unbiassed honest and mursiless MA . Nice weather and nice slopes. And no traffic. Great for ripping it up. Big angles and no speed limit. So what held you back? That was a joke. I read you have had an injury and you are making a recovery. I liked your turn shapes and your rhythm. And most of all your flow. Not everyone can keep mooving as smoothly as you can. Good skiing even if it was quite a bit on the defensive side.

Here is what I want you to do:
- Close your stance. By doing that it will be easier for you to balance over your outside ski.
- Balance over your outside ski. By doing that it will be easier to adjust your weight forwards.
- Forward weight. By doing that it will be easier to angulate and take your hips away from over your outside ski.
- Take your hips away from over your skis. By doing that you will be tipping your skis putting the edge of your outside ski do its work.
- Use the inside edge of your outside ski. By doing that you will be able to use the ski as its designed.
- Use the ski as its designed. By doing that you ski will be doing all the hard work and turning according to its turn radius.
- Use the turn radius of the ski. By doing that you will be able to turn with a minimum of effort.
- Use minimum effort in turning. By doing that you will insted of relying on bad stuff like hip rotation and massive skidding for turning be able to balance and perform a 100 times better.

Your flaws at the moment are:
- too wide stance
- inside ski weighting
- too square stance
- hip rotation
- entire outside of body rotating when partisipating in your pole plant
- banking
- back seat stance
- no upper lower body separation

The list is long but we all have the same issues to work on. One more thing. Get your skis tuned and waxed properly. Or get new skis and possibly boots as well.
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post



Your flaws at the moment are:
- too wide stance
- inside ski weighting
- too square stance
- hip rotation
- entire outside of body rotating when partisipating in your pole plant
- banking
- back seat stance
- no upper lower body separation

The list is long but we all have the same issues to work on. One more thing. Get your skis tuned and waxed properly. Or get new skis and possibly boots as well.

Good stuff, thanks!  I see all of this stuff when I ski.  

My skis have been waxed 3 ski days ago.  They were due.  They're brand new this season and I have never had a more stable, responsive ski.  They're not going anywhere for a long long time. 

The boots are the best fitting, warmest, most comfortable boots I've ever had.  They're not going anywhere either, but I will check out a bootfitter and discuss the canting issue that Garry suggested I do. I think that is part of the problem.  New boots......nope.  Fix them.........yep.

As for stance, that's staying for a while.   I'm not stable closer together yet.    I know about the upper/lower body separation and I don't do that.  I will make a conscious effort to do that.    I'm still in defense mode with tons of leg/foot pain, so the fact I'm even out there at all.......I do my best for now.  Next season....time to get serious.  :)
post #14 of 23
Good to hear that your skis and boots are new and that you are satisfied. If that was not the case then it would have been important to update them because they have such a big impact at how you ski. I did not read garrrys posting and Im not a boot fitter but I would not make too big hopes in messing with the alignment. I think that its more a technique issue. Try to narrow your stance and start to feel the outside ski pressure build up. Then balance over the outsid skiand try to angulate and cut back on the skidding in your turns. If you try to fix it with canting your boot for example you will still need to fix your technique. Work on your technique first. If your boots fit and they are warm then I think that is good enough. Do not let anybody do anything to your boots that cant be un done before you are positive that it will be for the better.

Try to ski on more easy terrain if you are not comfortable on steeper slopes. If you get into that defenssive mode too often then you will not be able to work it out of your system because that is what you have to do. Now your defenssive mode is full of bad skiing, Try to be defenssive with good movements and technique.

tdk
post #15 of 23
Go play some pool. Knock them in and repeat.  That will fix all you need in your skiing for now.

Nice smile  ! 
post #16 of 23
If you had to narrow your critique down to one thing, what would it be? (Hint: choose something with good leverage, something that if it was fixed would also improve some of the other shortcomings you may have identified in her skiing.)
post #17 of 23
A switch to Telemark would make the ankle problem go away. Also would make that inside ski a player rather than a spectator. Your weight can not be thrown onto your shin (or put there intentionally) if your heels are free. Unless you have Olympic aspirations, there is absolutely no reason you should be on alpine gear.
post #18 of 23
Nolo - If we stick to skiing I would most probably want her to balance over her outside ski. That will give her good leverage and make everything else possible.
post #19 of 23
 tdk6: Yes!!!!
post #20 of 23
Wow, Im getting the hang of it
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

If you had to narrow your critique down to one thing, what would it be? (Hint: choose something with good leverage, something that if it was fixed would also improve some of the other shortcomings you may have identified in her skiing.)
Don't steer with the upper body.
I get the feeling that Bonni is still a bit tentative and really wants to keep it reined it...things will flow a lot better as she gains confidence. Good to see her on skis and having fun.
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Tentative......yes.  Defensive......yes.  Having fun........yes.

I'm going to Silver on Saturday with GarryZ.  If the snow is good, I'll have him do some video on Silver Belt, which is a really fun cruiser that I feel safe on.  I'll try some things out and post.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post

Tentative......yes.  Defensive......yes.  Having fun........yes.

I'm going to Silver on Saturday with GarryZ.  If the snow is good, I'll have him do some video on Silver Belt, which is a really fun cruiser that I feel safe on.  I'll try some things out and post.

I got a couple ideas to see what you might feel. But we ski for fun ,first and foremost. Right ?  . Maybe a concept or two might sneak in there .
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