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How do YOU make the decision on what skis to purchase ? - Page 2

post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaStraightLine View Post

Some people(quit looking at me) purchase certain skis for certain conditions, so it does matter what conditions you demo a ski.

That's fair, but that situation didn't seem like it was the other poster's point.
post #32 of 63
 I start with general recommendations from my instructors, and then read reviews, then look into what I can find out about the make in terms of quality, then open demo.  I got into Head skis when they were one of six I demo'd earlier this year, and now I like a model they are discontinuing (naturally).
post #33 of 63
yeah, I hear this, but you forget its fun to try different stuff....


that said, even if I find something I like, I will still have to get what you say just to keep the peace!     BUT- yes, you were definitely right about the kastles!!! 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post





 Finn, did you read this? 

(I did modify it slightly for you)
 
post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


yeah, I hear this, but you forget its fun to try different stuff....

 
BUT buying and sending back before you even try??? 

 
post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post





   BUT- yes, you were definitely right about the kastles!!! 

 

 

Just keep saying that. 
post #36 of 63
Can't argue wit that other than the fact that you know where I live and what I have to look at......  that was just one pair dude!  You're killing me.  (I have bought and resold without trying)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post



BUT buying and sending back before you even try??? 

 




Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post




Just keep saying that. 

It's hard not to and easy to do so!
post #37 of 63
 
post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


Can't argue wit that other than the fact that you know where I live and what I have to look at......  that was just one pair dude!  You're killing me.  (I have bought and resold without trying)





It's hard not to and easy to do so!


 One pair...this week? Month? Season? LOL> 
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I buy used. I look at the radius, the width underfoot , the length and wood core or not. If its cheap enough (under $50) then a non-wood core is ok.
 


Whoah--where do you find a pair of skis for $50?
post #40 of 63
you don't, not thats worth skiing on anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


Whoah--where do you find a pair of skis for $50?
 
post #41 of 63
yes...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post





 One pair...this week? Month? Season? LOL> 
post #42 of 63
This not you.....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 
post #43 of 63
 I will not admit, nor deny that this video resembles me or anyone else that I hold dear to my heart.....

But a good friend said, "be more like your dog...", so this can't be a bad thing, .......can it

Love ya Finndug!
post #44 of 63
I'm careful where I go, some shops try to take advantage of you.  Or think you are like the many and you be fine just like them. 

I went onto a discussion forum then got some more expensive rentals off this store and had a chat and he suggested some ski's for me to try out.  When I buy, I may get via eBay cos cheaper and I get exactly what I tried and liked.  

But for some reason, I learnt to ski last year and at the end of last yr after 6 days, I just like the Head iSupershape, cheap rentals were fine for greens but at any of the blues, just didn't have grip or control, they didn't respond. 
post #45 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


Whoah--where do you find a pair of skis for $50?

 

Consignment ski shop in Dillon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaStraightLine View Post

you don't, not thats worth skiing on anyway.

 



 

WSL, These B2s are in fine condition and suit me quit nicely for coaching, beating up the side country and general cruising. The even had a fresh grind as the former owner was a tech in a shop. There are deals to be had. You just have to know where to look and looking in Summit County is easy. I have $15 skis with bindings that I'm going out on right now. 190cm Big Kahunas. Senior Rummage Sale.
post #46 of 63
Ive got a pair of twin tips like that, I use them to goof off when it snows in town, I won't ski them on a lift though, thy have no edges left. Most people (and shops) around here consider everything they touch gold, there are people trying to sell used lates 80s/early 90s straight skis for $50+ I usually get my good deals on new old stock stuff. I got my DH, GS, and SL skis for $150 each still in the plastic from different sources.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post




Consignment ski shop in Dillon.


WSL, These B2s are in fine condition and suit me quit nicely for coaching, beating up the side country and general cruising. The even had a fresh grind as the former owner was a tech in a shop. There are deals to be had. You just have to know where to look and looking in Summit County is easy. I have $15 skis with bindings that I'm going out on right now. 190cm Big Kahunas. Senior Rummage Sale.

Edited by WaStraightLine - 4/8/10 at 9:46am
post #47 of 63
Every piece of gear I own meets the following:

Skis:
Are they under $250 including shipping with bindings, $200 without bindings?
Do they fill a gap in the current quiver?
Have I heard good things about them here?

Bindings:
Are they under $50?
Are they less than 15 years old or all metal?
Does the din go 9 or higher?

Boots:
Are they under $50 including shipping?
Are they close to the right size?
Are they not rear entry?

Poles:
Were they free with the skis?
Were they under $10 at the thrift store?
Are they long enough or can I cut them down?

Apparel:
Is it under $50?
Does it fit?
Does it sorta match anything else I have?

But you folks probably already knew that.  Anyone that sees me on the hill probably does.

Edited by crgildart - 4/8/10 at 11:37am
post #48 of 63
Now that we're back to the original question.................? As one that buys several pairs of skis every year(I bought 6 pairs between Mar'09 and Mar'10), I find that every once in a while my "system" works.
I know what I am looking for in a particular type of ski(groomed, crud, powder, etc.) and usually talk with shop owners I know, following spring demos. What's hot, what's not. I also know how most of them ski.

I spend many hours perusing the ski reviews in the ski mags.(Yes, they are biased and I don't know all the specs of where they learned to snowplow, how many kids they have, and if one leg is longer than the other.)The fact that I am a "gearhead," makes this a very enjoyable way to spend my time until snowfall. But, in addition, I can generally narrow it down to several models that might meet my needs.

Since joining Epic, I have now begun to look for reviews of the particular models that I am interested in. I compare my weight and ability and conditions spent skiing to those of the reviewers(I must ignore age because I am very young for how old I am.) The "Usual Suspects" of Epic are very good at analyzing equipment, as well as, being able to verbalize it in a manner that people can understand.
Eventually, but not always, I will get around to trying the particular skis which then allows me to look for a "good" deal on the ones that I "can't live without!!!"
At any point in the process there can be "flaws" in the game and skis that don't meet my needs. For example, last week at Sun Valley I skied the Kastle MX78. They had extremely fast bases, excellent edge grip, and were very "quiet." They would be excellent if I was actually using an "all-mountain ski" for GS racing but then I would use an actual GS ski for that. At the same time, I would not prescribe it for as many skiers as some at Epic may be inclined to.
I found it to be a very good ski but not one that I rate as worth twice($$$) as good as other similar skis.My Stockli XXLs, Contact 4x4s, and Nordica Burners, although different in varying ways, will perform at a similar level, if not in a similar manner.

Right ,Wrong, or Indifferent, I love the "process" and the "joy" of trying and owning all the great and various skis that are being produced.
Here's to the "Dance."

  
post #49 of 63
Thread Starter 
Yup - there is joy in buying!
post #50 of 63
After spending a few hours at my favourite ski shop look at is new or on sale, I usually go home and see what others on Epicski are saying about a particular ski.  I then return to my ski shop and buy the skis I was looking at because you can always find at least 1 positive review on this website to help justify the decision.

  
post #51 of 63
You need two skis minimum IMO for the PNW, a good carving ski and a softer wider ski for the 4 weekends a year we get powder.
post #52 of 63
Thread Starter 
Totally agree with WaStraightLine for PNW.

If I were to start from scratch today with a fist full of dollars, I'd probably but Head Supershape iTitans for the carvers and Fischer Watea 94's for the powder days and any deeper days (wet / slush).

Actually, I just received my Watea 94's in the mail today

Here's how I decided on the Watea 94's:  I was not actually in the market for a new pair of skis (although I always WANT to buy more).  I was at the Demo day at Stevens Pass, WA and demoed several skis.  I tried the Head Peak 88 with Fluid Ride  tips and enjoyed them. I was talking with the reps at the demo tent, and I asked what else should I try that would be somewhat comparable to the Peak 88's.  He suggested I try the Watea 94's.  These were not skis that were even on my radar.  I gave them a try and they immediately felt "rignt" as soon as I stepped into the bindings and pushed off.  I felt more naturally balanced skiing on these than any other skis I've tried - just seemed to be a great ski that matched my physiology. The following week, I went to the ski shop, priced them out, and checked pricing online as well.  Although they were offered at a 'reasonable' end of season sale price (about 50% off), I still couldn't justify buying another pair of skis.  Than, several days later, I saw new pair being offered for 75% off, and I thought that was too good a deal to pass up - so I sort of made an impulse buy and ordered the skis - justifying that if i had buyers remorse, I could easily sell them on ebay or craigslist cheaper than anyone else.  As of today - no buyers remorse.  My bindings won't be in until next weekend, day before closing day, so chances are (unless I decide to do late spring at Whistler) that I won't ski on these until next season - something to look forward to all summer !
post #53 of 63
if you want to test them out on the last day the shop at steven's will mount them in less than an hour, I did that with my outlaws, $35 + the cost of my beer while I was waiting. They did a decent job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

Totally agree with WaStraightLine for PNW.

If I were to start from scratch today with a fist full of dollars, I'd probably but Head Supershape iTitans for the carvers and Fischer Watea 94's for the powder days and any deeper days (wet / slush).

Actually, I just received my Watea 94's in the mail today

Here's how I decided on the Watea 94's:  I was not actually in the market for a new pair of skis (although I always WANT to buy more).  I was at the Demo day at Stevens Pass, WA and demoed several skis.  I tried the Head Peak 88 with Fluid Ride  tips and enjoyed them. I was talking with the reps at the demo tent, and I asked what else should I try that would be somewhat comparable to the Peak 88's.  He suggested I try the Watea 94's.  These were not skis that were even on my radar.  I gave them a try and they immediately felt "rignt" as soon as I stepped into the bindings and pushed off.  I felt more naturally balanced skiing on these than any other skis I've tried - just seemed to be a great ski that matched my physiology. The following week, I went to the ski shop, priced them out, and checked pricing online as well.  Although they were offered at a 'reasonable' end of season sale price (about 50% off), I still couldn't justify buying another pair of skis.  Than, several days later, I saw new pair being offered for 75% off, and I thought that was too good a deal to pass up - so I sort of made an impulse buy and ordered the skis - justifying that if i had buyers remorse, I could easily sell them on ebay or craigslist cheaper than anyone else.  As of today - no buyers remorse.  My bindings won't be in until next weekend, day before closing day, so chances are (unless I decide to do late spring at Whistler) that I won't ski on these until next season - something to look forward to all summer !
 
post #54 of 63
Quote:ILOJ
 
(unless I decide to do late spring at Whistler) that I won't ski on these until next season - something to look forward to all summer !
It looks like Mt. Baker is going to stay open later, as well.
post #55 of 63
 I buy based on graphics shown in thumbnails here, and the phase of the moon. 
post #56 of 63

Price is important.  I like to feel like I got a good deal.  I also try and buy stuff nobody else is buying, and then show it can work better than what they are riding.  Graphics don't make the ski, but they can definately ruin a ski, if that makes sense.  I would turn down most of Dynastars twin tips based on graphics alone, not the ski.  However if it's tolerable and the dimensions I want, if it doesn't have the dopest new graphic I'll still buy it.

post #57 of 63

I trust certain brands that I have skied to produce a high quality ski with superior construction and design. This means to me that the ski will look good and last hundreds of days. I also have a feeling for the character of ski that a company produces, the nature or personality of the ski. Each pair of skis is the next step of experience with a brand or model. The skis evolve with me, changing with the need to try different things on skis. And once I own it and start skiing it, I go through some adaption to make it work. Wow! Skiing has the best gear.  

post #58 of 63

Five years ago I was skiing on a pair of 183 Salomon X-Scream 700s, I had traded for them at a used sporting goods shop. I liked them just fine, and I had skied about half of a miserable El Nino season on them. I really liked them, but one day I got a core shot, and since I had no knowledge of base repair, having only recently returned to skiing after more than a decade away from skiing, and being fearful of getting water in the core. I decided I had to put them in the shop for a base weld. It snowed huge that night.

 

I rented a mediocre pair of of all mountain Dynastars and managed to double eject somersault a couple of times before realizing the rental shop had set the bindings for a a type 1 skier instead of type 3. I never wanted to waste money renting so it became clear I needed a second pair of skis, as I had learned many of the people on the mountain seemed to consider standard practice. I thought the use of the word quiver was clever.

 

I was turned onto EBay by someone on the mountain, and after much searching  (it was during these searches that I first encountered epicski.com) and reading reviews about the various skis up for auction, I found an auction for a pair of 173 Volant Powerkarves. My winning bid was 30 cents. I had been planning on spending much more than the $30.30 I had, and quickly found a pair of 188 Volant Gravity Chubbs, which cost me $106 shipped (I had been told by a 30+ year veteran of Snowbowl, that fat skis were great in a lot of the conditions which were troublesome for me at that time, wide skis were strange to me, but I took his word for it, I thought that the 87mm G Chubb was really wide!)).

 

The difference in smoothness and stability in chop and crud was phenomenal. I decided that I might as well get more of them, as I planned on skiing for a long time. I was in the process of assessing my fourth or fifth pair (188 Ti Power) when I registered in the Barking Bear forums.

 

Anyway, I bought many pairs of them because they were inexpensive, I knew I would like the feel of them because they all had steel caps and wood cores. I became an addict of buying skis on ebay, I lusted after the steel, the steel was treasure, it was power! I became the curator of a strange museum of Volants, I acquired many different models, and even aspired to collect them all for a while there. I also got a real rush off of getting these big packages delivered, it made me feel special!

 

I am now a recovering addict, I sold off four pairs of skis last year, and only bought two. One pair were some bargain skinnies I bought to get the bindings off of. So really only 1 pair.

 

I have 13 pairs of skis currently mounted and skiable. I don't plan on adding any (in fact I want to reduce my quiver), but if I did, it would be another pair of 185 Machete FB, which are the best all around ski I've ever been on, and which have rule-the-universish dampness and stability. Also, a pair of 185 Machete Sin would be nice to try. There is a certainty that these skis will work just the way I want, so it comes down to whether I have the resources or not, whether there are any available, and whether I am looking when the price is right.

 

 

 

post #59 of 63

eeny, meeny, miny, moe......

post #60 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

eeny, meeny, miny, moe......



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