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Becoming a Ski instructor without the high fee's New Zealand - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post

Hey,

 

I know this was from a few years ago.  Just curious how the experience went and wondering if you have any firsthand advice you could offer.

 

I am a PSIA Level 1 instructor in the children's ski school at Taos in New Mexico.  I will be starting my second season as an instructor this November and I'm hoping to obtain a job in the southern hemisphere next year.  Ideally, I would like to work as an instructor at one of the resorts near Wanaka. 

 

This upcoming season I plan to get my Level 2, as well as one or two additional certifications.  I will definitely be getting my PSIA Park 1 cert (and hopefully my Park 2 if the timing works out; I believe you need your PSIA Level 2 before you can take your Park 2).  I may also work on a Child Specialist cert or an Adaptive cert.

 

I know that most of the ski schools near Wanaka begin taking applications at the beginning of February.  But, I don't think that I will have completed all of my certs by the time I need to apply.  I suppose my question then is, am I in a position to work as an instructor in NZ?  If not, are there other jobs at resorts that I should consider applying for (ideally something that comes with a season pass)?  I have experience working in ticket sales, tubing, and building maintenance.

 

Any advice, preferably from those with actual experience instructing in NZ, would be greatly appreciated.  

 

Thanks


It will be very difficult for you to get a job there.....but anything is possible.

post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post


It will be very difficult for you to get a job there.....but anything is possible.


Specifically instructing or finding work in general?  I know that instructing is probably a longshot, but I'm open to other things that afford me the opportunity to spend my summer skiing.  Any thoughts?

post #33 of 39
Hey, Hippie, PSIA has three certifications. There are additional accreditations (child specialist, senior specialist, freestyle, etc.) you can earn, but only the three certifications.
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Hey, Hippie, PSIA has three certifications. There are additional accreditations (child specialist, senior specialist, freestyle, etc.) you can earn, but only the three certifications.


Yea, when I mentioned I'm going for a child specialist cert, freestyle cert, and adaptive cert I should have said accreditation.  Sorry for any confusion. 

post #35 of 39

Hippie, can you get a working holiday visa? Getting sponsored for instructing with your experience is unlikely, and I'm not even sure if they do sponsor for other jobs. If you can get a visa, you can apply for a whole range of jobs on the mountain websites, do you have any other experience in customer service or food and beverage? 

 

What you can also do is just take a risk and go down there and see what happens, all the mountains will run hiring clinics at the start of season to fill their ski schools, if you ski well, you can get your foot in the door that way. It's bit daunting just taking a risk like that, but I did it in NZ and made it work, and did a similar thing in Chile too.

post #36 of 39

Thanks for the post Jim.  From the information I have found it seems as though it is pretty easy for people 18-30 to obtain a working holiday visa, which allows you to work in the country for 12 months.  I believe it is different from a sponsored visa where the employer and duration of the position are predetermined.  As I mentioned in my previous post, I do have experience working in various departments at my home mountain (ticket sales/customer service, snow tubing, and building maintenance),  I wouldn't mind working in one of these areas if it afforded me the opportunity to ski for free. 

 

Based on the information I have received from people who have instructed in NZ, I'm pretty sure I am going to abandon the idea of teaching there for right now.  With such a high number of qualified applicants, the chances of getting hired with my credentials are slim to none.  I'm going to continue building up my ski resume and see if I can make it happen down the road.  In the meantime, I plan to shift focus to finding another position at a resort. 

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post


Specifically instructing or finding work in general?  I know that instructing is probably a longshot, but I'm open to other things that afford me the opportunity to spend my summer skiing.  Any thoughts?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post

Thanks for the post Jim.  From the information I have found it seems as though it is pretty easy for people 18-30 to obtain a working holiday visa, which allows you to work in the country for 12 months.  I believe it is different from a sponsored visa where the employer and duration of the position are predetermined.  As I mentioned in my previous post, I do have experience working in various departments at my home mountain (ticket sales/customer service, snow tubing, and building maintenance),  I wouldn't mind working in one of these areas if it afforded me the opportunity to ski for free. 

 

Based on the information I have received from people who have instructed in NZ, I'm pretty sure I am going to abandon the idea of teaching there for right now.  With such a high number of qualified applicants, the chances of getting hired with my credentials are slim to none.  I'm going to continue building up my ski resume and see if I can make it happen down the road.  In the meantime, I plan to shift focus to finding another position at a resort. 

I was referring to instructing intially, but it will be tough to get other jobs as well.  Having said that you are now entering a unique position, in that it is really really late to find a job for this season....ironically this can be a good thing, as in lots of cases candidate they hired earlier failed to show up, or decided to leave, or they quit one job in favour of another....bottom line there is always some early season "churn" which you can use to your advantage.  However to get one of these jobs you need to have your own visa and be on the ground ready to start within a day or two.

post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

 

I was referring to instructing intially, but it will be tough to get other jobs as well.  Having said that you are now entering a unique position, in that it is really really late to find a job for this season....ironically this can be a good thing, as in lots of cases candidate they hired earlier failed to show up, or decided to leave, or they quit one job in favour of another....bottom line there is always some early season "churn" which you can use to your advantage.  However to get one of these jobs you need to have your own visa and be on the ground ready to start within a day or two.


If I were to head to NZ it wouldn't be until next summer.  Definitely something I will keep in mind for next year though.

post #39 of 39

Hi Guys

 

Anyone needing advise on skiing/riding in New Zealand, get back to me... I'm based in Wanaka, playing on Treble Cone and been in the Snow sports industry for 25+ year. Just love my office.

 

Take Care

 

Dean

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