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A New Outlook for Next Season

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I have a new plan for next season. As this season has ended for me, with it being the beginning of April and all, I've decided to re-evaluate my skiing. It occurred to me at the end of this season that if I'm ever going to really take my skiing to the next level I'm going to need to add some new skills to my bag of tricks. Until then I'll still only be a "decent" skier - or so I've been told by level two PSIA instructors.

So what do I have my sights set on for next season? Well, my new focus is going to be on steering, pivoting, up movements, not re-centering (don't want to be too far forward), reducing edging, and not actively countering (ski into and out of, you know...). I'm also thinking of starting to use inclination at the top of my turns, but I'm worried that this won't work with steered turns, so I might have to mix in some arc-to-arc carving with strong up movements to make this happen.

I only expect these new skills to help me on blue groomers though, so I'm going to need something to help me "level up" on the rest of the mountain - especially moguls. I'm going to have to master my toe grab, ankle roll, and foot twisting. Along with this I'll need skills like "pushing my uphill toes forward and down" as to stomp onto my edges. This will make me release and become weightless (not sure how, but I'm told it happens... I suspect an up move though) until I can stomp onto my new edges.

Hopefully everything listed above will add enough to my bag of tricks that I can graduate from being a decent skier, to being at least being at the same level as our L2 or L3 resident pros. I may still lack their command of a keyboard, so maybe in preparation I'll also throw in a typing class this summer in lieu of my normal 4,500 miles on my bike.

The insights I've gained this year have been truly eye opening.

Here's to you guys.
post #2 of 20
Nothing like spring spray.

Seriously, rock a pumptrack this summer in addition to the road bike.  It'll smooth you out.
post #3 of 20
post #4 of 20
Greg, you're coaching racing now, so your primary focus is on avoiding speed dumping at all cost.  Steering has no profitable place in a race course. If you eventually move out of that environment in your teaching you will discover that many folks do not want to spend all their time traveling at the high speeds proper carving produces.  They don't want to always have to be contorting into the body positions needed to reduce their radius when carving, or fight the Gs carving at big angles produces.  They also don't want to have their only other alternative to carving be the pushy/pivoty turn shape brought about by the zipper down the falline approach.  Those rushed initiation turns are just plain ugly and inefficient on terrain below black.  Teaching broad and refined steering skills offers a much more relaxing option for skiers not into ripping at mach speed all the time.   
post #5 of 20
Um, didn't anyone notice the date???     
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

Um, didn't anyone notice the date???     

Yep -- a combo of springtime humor (4/1) and spray = spring spray. 
post #7 of 20
WOW I'm only Level I and i can see many solutions, what's wrong with those Leveltwos, they from canada or wut??

It's time to sell your skis and get a pair of snowler blades, there's an added benefit of them being much easier to transport and cheaper to wax. Have you had your alighnment checked by a professional? if you having trouble focusing on your up movement this is definitly the problem. If you really want to move up a leve;l and are having re-centering issues there's a device i've seen that mounts to your skies behind the binders and attaches to your bum; it's designed to keep you out of the back seat and seems it could also be a nifty seat if the cafeteria is crowded. Assuming none of this works I'd move your left binding forward 2.34mm and the right binding back the same. Work on this and send us some vidio
post #8 of 20
Greg, you almost had me dropping my jaw too, but good one.... 
post #9 of 20
My plan next year is to wear a colorful pair of tights and stand in line with a bunch of other guys in tights waiting to take a run down an icy course when there's a foot of fresh snow on the rest of the mountain.  I love it when I get to watch them plant their poles and bend over at the start of the run.  After all, being the fastest guy through a NASTAR course in my resort proves I'm a better man than everyone else in the WHOLE WOLRLD!

-Sundown-
post #10 of 20
next year I'm taking up snowboarding
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

I have a new plan for next season. As this season has ended for me, with it being the beginning of April and all, I've decided to re-evaluate my skiing...

This is when I realized it was a joke...
post #12 of 20
Helluva found a clever way of ranting psia and masking it as a 1st of aprill joke  ha ha haaa. BTW, why is ancle tipping considered a psia exclusive movement and a bad thing? Does psia teach students to be in the back seat? Does psia not teach anticipation? Or are these jokes as well .
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

Greg, you're coaching racing now, so your primary focus is on avoiding speed dumping at all cost.  Steering has no profitable place in a race course. If you eventually move out of that environment in your teaching you will discover that many folks do not want to spend all their time traveling at the high speeds proper carving produces.  ...Teaching broad and refined steering skills offers a much more relaxing option for skiers not into ripping at mach speed all the time.   

I think you took my post too seriously. As others pointed out, it was April first. I thought I'd have a little fun.

Anyhow, since you took the time to write a post... I actually taught more than just racers this year. Racing was the focus, but I had a wide range of students from beginners to expert level bump lessons. I'm not sure I want to open this can of worms, but I taught each without the mention of things like active rotation or up movements to release... as well as a myriad of other things that you can probably make an accurate guess at. So, that said, I agree that a full command of many movements is necessary in and out of the race course regardless of level. However, there are certain movements that regardless of skill level or end-goals will only produce short term, limited results. Those are the things that I avoid when I teach. I do prefer teaching in the racing environment though. Traditional instruction is not the place for me I don't think. 
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Helluva found a clever way of ranting psia and masking it as a 1st of aprill joke  ha ha haaa.

Clearly you left your sense of humor at home today. My post had little to do with PSIA, just things that have been said on EpicSki in the last year - by PSIA and non-PSIA folks alike. Anyhow, mostly irrelevant...

Just out of curiosity though - how much time have you spent in a PSIA ski school? Have you taken lessons from one, worked in one, or even been coached by a PSIA instructor? Not that it matters, but it might be an interesting frame of reference for everyone.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post




I think you took my post too seriously. As others pointed out, it was April first. I thought I'd have a little fun.

Anyhow, since you took the time to write a post... I actually taught more than just racers this year. Racing was the focus, but I had a wide range of students from beginners to expert level bump lessons. I'm not sure I want to open this can of worms, but I taught each without the mention of things like active rotation or up movements to release... as well as a myriad of other things that you can probably make an accurate guess at. So, that said, I agree that a full command of many movements is necessary in and out of the race course regardless of level. However, there are certain movements that regardless of skill level or end-goals will only produce short term, limited results. Those are the things that I avoid when I teach. I do prefer teaching in the racing environment though. Traditional instruction is not the place for me I don't think. 
 

Greg, because of our private discussions in the past, my confusion about this thread being a joke is I'm sure understandable to you.  

Most skills, when looked at and used in isolation, will return only limited results.  The magic is found when they find their role in the mosaic of expert skiing.  

Good luck to you as you carve your path through the world of instruction, wherever it may eventually take you.  
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post




Clearly you left your sense of humor at home today. My post had little to do with PSIA, just things that have been said on EpicSki in the last year - by PSIA and non-PSIA folks alike. Anyhow, mostly irrelevant...
 

You did reference PSIA in your post, why wouldn't he think you are saying something about it?
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

You did reference PSIA in your post, why wouldn't he think you are saying something about it?

I referenced a lot of things in my post, most of which had nothing to do with PSIA. PSIA references were merely a reference point... a moot one at that.
post #18 of 20
Greg, I must have missed your previous posts. Where did you coach this year? Just curious.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Clearly you left your sense of humor at home today. My post had little to do with PSIA, just things that have been said on EpicSki in the last year - by PSIA and non-PSIA folks alike. Anyhow, mostly irrelevant...

Just out of curiosity though - how much time have you spent in a PSIA ski school? Have you taken lessons from one, worked in one, or even been coached by a PSIA instructor? Not that it matters, but it might be an interesting frame of reference for everyone.
 

Sorry Greg for the humourless approach in my previous posting. You are asking good questions. Im not sticking under the stool with the fact that I have no what so ever connection to PSIA. I have never skied in the US and therefore never taken a lesson or worked in a PSIA ski school. My knowledge in this respect comes from the net. Discussions, documentation and videos. Mostly here at epic. That should give a fearly good frame of reference of my knowledge of the PSIA. Some consepts I like some I dont. For instance I dont like the gliding wedge but I like the TGIF consept. I have also been quite well treated by PSIA members here at epic and all I can say is that its been a give and take thing and very educational. I know a lot more about skiing now than ever before. Im also more liberal now.  
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

You did reference PSIA in your post, why wouldn't he think you are saying something about it?

Yeah, my take on this was that it was a clever way of getting at among other things P**A without having to account for it. But Im smarter than that .
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