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First time tele gear...

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I've been skiing alpine for almost 15 years and got the opportunity to learn to tele last year and it was some of the most fun that I have had at my hill in a long time.  This year I think that its time to get myself a tele set up so that I can actually continue to learn tele.  Right now, being that its going to be my first set up I was thinking of just using an old set of alpine skis that are in my garage.  They are still in decent shape so I think they will work unless I find a deal that I just can't turn down.

I understand that most of my money will be spent on the boots.  The question I have on boots is do I buy them in the same level as my alpine boots or do I prepare to go through several boots (mind you it took about 10 min to learn to turn on tele)? Bindings are a brand new game for me that I know even less about right now.

If you guys have any suggestions to where to start building this set up especially if its a good idea to try to ski into advanced gear or not that would really help me out. 

Thanks
brad
post #2 of 12
 What boots did you use during the ten minutes it took to master Telemark turns? Were they adequate or did you 'outgrow' them ?

Expert Telemarkers often use slightly softer/lighter boots  than intermediate/advanced Telemarkers. Stiff is bad for beginners, but highly skilled skiers can get good performance from three buckle, medium flex boots. It's not like alpine where you keep getting stiffer boots as you progress. This is partially because traditionally, the appeal of freeheel downhill was doing more with less, but more because less weight is better for climbing. Softer boots will require greater skill to ski at a high level of performance. Get a medium flex boot and skip the intermediate phase.

Everything being equal, bigger skis (wider, stiffer) will require bigger boots (taller, stiffer).

I usually recommend safety release bindings, specifically Voilé CRB, but you've probably already advanced beyond the need for such.
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodeofive View Post

I've been skiing alpine for almost 15 years and got the opportunity to learn to tele last year and it was some of the most fun that I have had at my hill in a long time.  This year I think that its time to get myself a tele set up so that I can actually continue to learn tele.  Right now, being that its going to be my first set up I was thinking of just using an old set of alpine skis that are in my garage.  They are still in decent shape so I think they will work unless I find a deal that I just can't turn down.

I understand that most of my money will be spent on the boots.  The question I have on boots is do I buy them in the same level as my alpine boots or do I prepare to go through several boots (mind you it took about 10 min to learn to turn on tele)? Bindings are a brand new game for me that I know even less about right now.

If you guys have any suggestions to where to start building this set up especially if its a good idea to try to ski into advanced gear or not that would really help me out. 

Thanks
brad

Rod your sarcasmometer just broke. 


oops edit; I misspelled sarcasmometer
Edited by GarryZ - 3/30/10 at 4:26pm
post #4 of 12
 Oops, yeah, I overlooked that bit. Sorry, Rodeo, ignore my sarcasm. The gist of my post is sincere. I would suggest a medium flex boot and Voilé CRB bindings. I don't think you'll outgrow either.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
I didn't mean to be arogant about the time it takes to learn something...I should have stated the amount of time in conversation that I spent before actually putting on the equipment and trust me I am the first to say that I am not much past a mid beginner on telemark but I think I can move through everything in a fairly quick manner too.  I've been an alpine instructor for 8 years as well so I did have a small amount of background in tele and an amazing instructor to teach me.  

I was actually using his equipment and the boots I think were fairly stiff but not too stiff at the same time. 

Thanks the for the information and if you have any more it would help out still too.

By the way I am not easily offended so the sarcasm didn't bother me too much.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
sorry for the double post and the spelling above...but are there any good websites to check out for good reviews and priceing on some new stuff that anyone knows about?
post #7 of 12
 With modern Telemark gear and advanced alpine skills, it is possible to progress quickly. I don't doubt that you picked it up in a short time. It would take me a million years to learn a rodeo5. If you can do those, you are undoubtedly a gifted athlete. 

Telemarktips.com is the best source of info about Telemark. There are a lot of people here too that know more about it than I do, If I've answered your questions wrong, or if they have something to add, we'll hear from them.

There have been a couple other threads here recently about taking up Telemark skiing. It's nice to see the increased interest.
post #8 of 12
 Telemark Talk and Off Piste are good sources of information. I agree with Telerod 15 on boots. Starting with a softer boot (and binding flex) gives you more feedback while learning yet are perfectly capable of expert skiing. Change to a stiff boot if you prefer later, after you have logged enough miles to know what you like. My order of preference is Garmont-Black Diamond-Scarpa and there are many that like it the other way around. With footwear, reviews only get you in the ballpark. Unfortunately, getting your feet pinched by the bellows or finding the flex wrong for you are considerations no one can make for you. Teleboots seem to use fewer shell sizes than alpine so it also depends on your foot size. 

Ski reviews are more obvious. An even flex is most versatile, but that doesn't necessarily mean soft.
post #9 of 12
If you're buying both boots and bindings, seriously consider NTN.  There is now a fairly wide range of boots to cover all preferences for flex and fit.  NTN bindings are releasable, have brakes, a pretty good touring function, they are very easy to get in and out of and are pretty much unexcelled for skiing control.  Put 'em on any skis that you like (they have a nifty plate system that allows you to switch the binding system to different skis).  

NTN requires system/dedicated boots - you can't use the traditional duckbill bindings on them, and you can't use duckbill boots in NTN bindings.  

Telemarktips.com forums offers endless tedious discussion on NTN, as well as all other permutations of tele.  I'm prepared to go on and on about them here as well.  
post #10 of 12
I would second the NTN thought. I bought a NTN set up last year. And like you I was a long time Alpine Skier that wanted to try something new. The NTN is an awesome set up and I have no regrets.
post #11 of 12
I "upgraded" to NTN in he past couple weeks.  I had been using Hammerheads and Scarpa T1's & T2X's.  Loved the old set-up, and looking forward to the new for some of the advantages of the system, but so as not to muddy the waters, I won't get into it.
post #12 of 12
I'm in exactly the same position, and i plan to:
  • buy 2010 NTN bindings from Rottefella with red springs (i also consider NTbulldog with touring mode; not compatible with G3 Onyx/Dynafit heels, but made of steel; Rotte's NTN can break!)
  • couple them with Dynafit heel units (to lock my heels when it goes 40+ degree vert) as jarlybart did,
  • and Scarpa Terminator X Pro boots (i heard they don't break anymore, i mean 2010 stock).

Too soft boots, you say? For some reason i dislike too stiff boots, preferred flex index is 90..100, and walk mode is a must. If i needed stiffer boot, i'd go with Scarpa TX Comp. But those do not have a walk mode switch, just forward lean adjustment.

As for the ski, i definitely want twintips that can handle all mountain (incl. icy bumps) well and can also do one/two feet deep powder.
I think older Volkl Gotama Blizzard The Answer or K2 obSETHed will do, right? (that WAS THE question indeed)
Or should i stick with not so wide, but tested-and-true, K2 Extreme (ex-Public Enemy, AFAIK)?

My tastes are what they are because i like slackcountry, riding backwards, and i patrol (for a couple of weeks a year) on local mountain. I'm 189cm tall, my weight is 75kg w/o pack and clothes (but i'm always with a pack), ability level is... dunno, maybe 8+? :-) From early childhood i've ripped it all, can enjoy almost any slope in about any condition (coz good conditions are seldom here in west Ukraine), and if on greens/blues, i like to gscarve really fast, given proper planks. BTW, been used to straight race ski, but it changed two years ago :-)
Edited by combiner - 4/10/10 at 2:50pm
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