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knees not bending

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have just become a member of this forum - kindly bear with me if I have over looked this forum's protocol.
Last week I took some ski lessons and the instructor told me that I am not bending my knees - at least not as much as it is required  - even in my basic stance (standstill) position. I also observed that my instructor knees were visibly far more flexed than mine - but when I tried to bend it more - my shins were touching the shoe tongue already and I have no room to bend my knees any more.
Having said that I have a feeling that I can bend my knee further with proper technique and training?
Can anybody help me out here?
Please ask me further questions if needs be
many thanks
post #2 of 7
can you bend your knees that much when you are NOT in the ski boot?  If you can your boot are too stiff.  see a boot fitter to get them to make them softer.

If you can't bend your knees outside a ski boot, then some balance changes/ boot changes need to be made.  sometimes a more upright rear cuff, inside heel lifts,  outside toe lifts, bindings mounted more forward etc...

odds are your can flex your ankles/knees and your boots are too stiff and too big
post #3 of 7
Without seeing you in person it is hard to know if you have a physical reason why you are not bending your knees as much as the instructor.
One factor that can be worth checking is your range of Dorsiflexion, this is the amount you are able to flex your foot upward, but in relation to skiing it is also the amount of forward flex at the ankle while in bare feet, if this is limited for some reason there are many things that can be done by a good boot fitter to help you ski better.
If you are at an entry level to skiing, it can take a while before you look as good as an instructor at bending at the knees, some of them do make it look easy, and you just have to put in the hours and take more lessons, if it is a boot issue then it is best seeing a good boot fitter and rule out any boot issues.
post #4 of 7
From your wording, it sounds to me as if you are not trying to flex the boot. Rather it sounds as if you are taking the point in your range of motion where the shin touches the tongue and you are stopping your movements. The point at which your shin touches the boot tongue is where you start your movement or flex, not where you stop.

Basics.......................

First; your shin should touch the tongue of the boot all the time. This is your neutral or  "ready" position.
Second; think about flexing from your ankle not your knee. If you flex your ankle, everything else will fall into line.
Third; when it is time to turn, flex your ankles so that you actively push against the boot tongue with your shin.

SJ
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post

can you bend your knees that much when you are NOT in the ski boot?  If you can your boot are too stiff.  see a boot fitter to get them to make them softer.

If you can't bend your knees outside a ski boot, then some balance changes/ boot changes need to be made.  sometimes a more upright rear cuff, inside heel lifts,  outside toe lifts, bindings mounted more forward etc...

odds are your can flex your ankles/knees and your boots are too stiff and too big

Yes, I can bend my knees when I am not in my ski boot.
In a vertical plane, my knees can flex farther than my knees.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

From your wording, it sounds to me as if you are not trying to flex the boot. Rather it sounds as if you are taking the point in your range of motion where the shin touches the tongue and you are stopping your movements. The point at which your shin touches the boot tongue is where you start your movement or flex, not where you stop.

Basics.......................

First; your shin should touch the tongue of the boot all the time. This is your neutral or  "ready" position.
Second; think about flexing from your ankle not your knee. If you flex your ankle, everything else will fall into line.
Third; when it is time to turn, flex your ankles so that you actively push against the boot tongue with your shin.

SJ
I think this nailed it.
I cannot flex my ankle, at least not totally, with my ski boots on.
Before my ankles are totally flexed, any further movements are arrested by the tongue of the boots - which btw stay  rigid,
So does this mean I need new boots?( btw I use HEAD EZON 7.2) or some boot fitting ?
Or do I have to wear my boots little more relaxed (less tight), an idea which I am not very comfortable with?
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramkiboy View Post



I think this nailed it.
I cannot flex my ankle, at least not totally, with my ski boots on.
Before my ankles are totally flexed, any further movements are arrested by the tongue of the boots - which btw stay  rigid,
So does this mean I need new boots?( btw I use HEAD EZON 7.2) or some boot fitting ?
Or do I have to wear my boots little more relaxed (less tight), an idea which I am not very comfortable with?



 

We are about at the limit of internet bootfitting here, but here are my best guesses.

First is a basic one, when you feel the boot tongue you have to push hard against the resistance. The boot you have is not nearly stiff enough to keep you from flexing it. You have to exert some power against the tongue.

Second, there may be fit issues which are keeping you from being able to exert energy against the tongue. A grossly oversized boot would be a common culprit here.

Third, you may have an extremely limited range of motion in your foot/ankle which prevents you from pressuring the boot tongue. This is a personal biomechanical problem that can be worked with.

All these possibilities can be worked with by a competent bootfitter. You need to go find one and don't forget to bring your boots and your feet. Leave your socks at home as they are probably too thick.

SJ
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