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Stcky, suction spring snow that stops you in your tracks: Can it be avoided? - Page 3

post #61 of 68

Unfortunately my comptuer wont let me cut and paste for some reason...its security.  

 

There is lots of goood info from expert racers (generally those who wax) on how a proper waxing makes turns easier....yep much easier to twist a unlocked ski from a locked one.     But, I think its a relative----to each of us.   We are all used to our OWN technique and ability to turn.     Then if we wax on wet days, we find its easier.     So a few percentage points can be seen at each level.         The question is...do you want to spend 1/2 hr to 1 hr structuring and waxing for the extra gain?   Or spend 30-50 bucks for it.      The answer to that is....its up to you.       

 

Guess my point might be.....maybe its better to take a lesson with a focus on skiing crud.       But if you are above that level, yep wax is your most economical method of having more fun.

 

I know folks who wax each time they go skiing, which is about 3 times a year---meaning days.   Its part of their routine like a pitcher not washing his game day socks.     I also watch them ski....the wax is not coming off in the amount of time they spend on them.      Cant get these wedge christie turners in a lesson to save my life.   Too expensive....and I won't get involved for other reasons.      But alll of this is changing the thread subject.    

 

For my two cents, I wish I had the time and money to wax....but I give up that for time and expendatures on my kids.    Dad just deals with sticky snow and unwaxed skis---skiing 60+ days/yr.  When I do put some Zardos or spend 10 bucks for a quick on snow wax job....sure is nice for one or two runs or a  1/2 day respectively.

 

My bases hate me and they show it.  

 

post #62 of 68

Back when we raced in the 70's we used lemon scented Pledge sprayed on our bases- did not last long but it was wicked fast.

post #63 of 68


You sound like an environmentalist

 

[/sarcasm]

Quote:
Originally Posted by srd View Post

Back when we raced in the 70's we used lemon scented Pledge sprayed on our bases- did not last long but it was wicked fast.

post #64 of 68



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by I:)Skiing View Post

 

For my two cents, I wish I had the time and money to wax....but I give up that for time and expendatures on my kids.    Dad just deals with sticky snow and unwaxed skis---skiing 60+ days/yr.  When I do put some Zardos or spend 10 bucks for a quick on snow wax job....sure is nice for one or two runs or a  1/2 day respectively.
 

There is snow here in the NW that stops you almost when you ski into it. Many times it is a suprise. This is were the rub-on for a few good runs is essential.
post #65 of 68

Yeah, I keep saying it's a certain type of snow, it's not corn, it's a certain amount of wetness and it's natural snow.  Once this snow has had the opportunity to convert to corn, the danger is gone.  In the meantime, preparing for it rules my life.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoeLarryCheese View Post

There is snow here in the NW that stops you almost when you ski into it. Many times it is a suprise. This is were the rub-on for a few good runs is essential.


 

post #66 of 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Yeah, I keep saying it's a certain type of snow, it's not corn, it's a certain amount of wetness and it's natural snow.  Once this snow has had the opportunity to convert to corn, the danger is gone.  In the meantime, preparing for it rules my life.
 


 


Sibhusky: I think you described it at one point as "skiing on a rubber mat". I've come across a lot of that. Always natural snow. Always snow that doesn't have groom marks on it. Any dirt or grey on it exacerbates the grab. That said, when you see this stuff, you can always head over to a groomed run instead. Normally I avoid groomers, but at this point it's easier to go to a groomer than slog through the rubber mat snow.

post #67 of 68

which is fine if the snow didn't fall on top of the grooming.  Then it needs to get sort of mixed around into the other stuff awhile before it's okay.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


Sibhusky: I think you described it at one point as "skiing on a rubber mat". I've come across a lot of that. Always natural snow. Always snow that doesn't have groom marks on it. Any dirt or grey on it exacerbates the grab. That said, when you see this stuff, you can always head over to a groomed run instead. Normally I avoid groomers, but at this point it's easier to go to a groomer than slog through the rubber mat snow.

post #68 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

which is fine if the snow didn't fall on top of the grooming.  Then it needs to get sort of mixed around into the other stuff awhile before it's okay.
 


 


Mine always occurs when melting point is reached.


 

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