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Alpine Touring Skis

Poll Results: Heres some others I have seen

Poll expired: Apr 24, 2010  
  • 100% (1)
    Black Diamond Zealot
  • 0% (0)
    K2 Sidestash
  • 0% (0)
    Icelantic Shaman
  • 0% (0)
    Dynafit Stoke
  • 0% (0)
    G3 Zenoxide
  • 0% (0)
    Voile Insane
1 Total Vote  
post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So I have been looking into getting a new pair of skis, I am currently riding the Coomback skis 188.  I like the skis for how they float and how light they are, but I am realizing they suck for going fast,  not stiff enough. (I know they are new, I am going to be selling them)  I like to ride hard and fast and turn very little.  So I have been looking at the K2 Sidestash's and Black Diamond Zealot's.  I want a stiff ski that has some type of rocker and has a waist between 100-110.  I tend to ski 50/50 in bounds and out, which I prefer point them straight down the mountain and doing long wide turns.  Which I know the Zealot's would do fine for this, but I somtimes end up in the trees and need a ski I can force into some tighter turns.  Also I would like to try and stay somewhat light and now have skis that are like all mountain skis, I dont want to die on the first tour.  I am about 190 to 200 Ib and 6'0"  What do you guys recommend?  Any other skis I should look at?  What do you think on length, 192 can be a bit long I would think?
post #2 of 9
Faction Thirteen.  Flat tail, long early rise-tip, flat camber.  If these are too soft for you, you're a bigger man than I.  With the early-rise tip they ski a lot shorter than they look.  And a big 'ole turning radius.  Like almost half a football field.
post #3 of 9
Pm gear lhasa pow 186 191 or 196
dps rp112 wailer 105 or lotus 120 for more float
 all light weight carbon fiber and stiff
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpineclimber View Post

I like to ride hard and fast and turn very little...I tend to ski 50/50 in bounds and out, which I prefer point them straight down the mountain and doing long wide turns....but I somtimes end up in the trees and need a ski I can force into some tighter turns..... I dont want to die on the first tour. 

 

Without knowing your skill level, and what and where you are typically skiing, it's hard to offer advice.  It sounds like you are mostly an in-bounds and side-country skier, particularly since, if you skied serious BC lines in the GS style you describe, you probably would die on your first tour.  I wouldn't want any of the skis on your list except the Shamans, which certainly are not for the type of skiing you describe.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Rapritz, what would you recommend then for a wider ski that is not too flexible for the backcountry?  I am still new to BC and realized that I wanted a bit more speed out of my skis than my Coombacks.  And for background, I ski everything, I tend to try and stay away from tight trees though.  And I mostly ski in Telluride and the San Juans and up in the Tetons.  And as I said before I like to ski above the tree like, not a bit fan of tight trees.
post #6 of 9
 Consider the Praxis BC.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
And also on the Shamans, would I be able to get much speed out of them?  I know there radius is pretty tight.
post #8 of 9
sidestash sounds about right.   
post #9 of 9
I have been on the 2010 Zealots in the 182 for about 50 days this season inbounds and out. I also owned the 2009 192 Zealots last year until I broke them on a bad landing at Kicking Horse on opening day this year.  I am 6'0" and 185lbs.

I would STRONGLY reccomend the 2010 Zealot for a touring ski or even an inbounds ski.  They float really well in chest deep powder, can handle the groomers back to the chair with no issue and are quite stiff for charging.  I should also point out that I have never had an issue negotiating the tightest of trees.  The 2009s (the brown ones) were significantly stiffer in the tip which made handling trees in pain in the butt, but on the 2010s with the rocker and softer tip I have never had an issue in any tight terrain.

If I were using the ski as an inbounds setup I would have stayed with the 192, but since I also use the skis as a touring setup I decided that the 182 would be a bit more manouverable in the trees, tight chutes, etc.  So far stepping down to the 182 has been perfect for me, but granted I am a few pounds lighter than you.

A bit more info can be found in a thread a posted at TGR:

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php?t=179524&highlight=zealot
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