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Altitude Sickness

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Well as promised I have started researching this issue mainly for the purpose of my own education in preparing for a ski trips. Any time that I get to spend in the Big Mountain states is pure gold and is highly coveted. Therefore, any information that I can get on increasing my athletic performance and just plain increasing my enjoyment factor would be appreciated.

Here is a link to some information that I found.
http://health.excite.com/content/dmk...rticle_5462511

Well that's all for now folks,

Later, Peace & Out<FONT size="1">

[This message has been edited by Fast1EV (edited April 12, 2000).]</FONT>
post #2 of 9
Fast1EV-
Thanks for the info.
What sort of training you do to prep for a trip???<FONT size="1">

[This message has been edited by PowderPoacher (edited April 13, 2000).]</FONT>
post #3 of 9
I just would like to comment that I used to have terrible altitude sickness. Headaches, vomiting.. the works. A few years ago I tried diamox and it is my miracle drug ; )

You don't know how much it would suck to go on a week ski trip and be in bed the first two days. This medicine totally relieves all my sickness.

Too bad it doesn't give me more energy in that thin air ; )
I guess I will just need to exercise some more before I go skiing
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
PowderPoacher,

I started this search because I am planning to be out west more in this one year than any other time in my life. Like I have mentioned before I am back after what I thought was 6 years off but today my wife pointed out that it is actually 8 years. Anyway I am looking to maximize my time their. I usually had only one day of alt. sickness and mine was always mild.

The thin air is more of a concern to me. However, I am following Coulior's lead and will try some preventative meds and iron supplements to hopefully raise O2 transport in the blood. I started doing this on the advice of my father who was a MD and it seems to help. Also drink water as much as you can. The side effect is . . . well . . lower digestive tract backup. If you know what I mean. Oatmeal baby, all I can say is Oatmeal. I am still going to keep researching for vitamin supplements and other meds. If find out any info I will post.

Other than the above the rest IMHO is all cardio endurance. I work out on a NordiTack and cycle. I am trying to put intervals of sprints into both of my cardio works outs to hopefully increase strength and endurance. I hope that some community members that might have some knowledge on this can point me in the right direction. Help need an exercise physiologist!!!


Later, Peace & Out

"We all can't be Ed Viesturs"
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
PowderPoacher,

I started this search because I am planning to be out west more in this one year than any other time in my life. Like I have mentioned before I am back after what I thought was 6 years off but today my wife pointed out that it is actually 8 years. Anyway I am looking to maximize my time their. I usually had only one day of alt. sickness and mine was always mild.

The thin air is more of a concern to me. However, I am following Coulior's lead and will try some preventative meds and iron supplements to hopefully raise O2 transport in the blood. I started doing this on the advice of my father who was a MD and it seems to help. Also drink water as much as you can. The side effect is . . . well . . lower digestive tract backup. If you know what I mean. Oatmeal baby, all I can say is Oatmeal. I am still going to keep researching for vitamin supplements and other meds. If find out any info I will post.

Other than the above the rest IMHO is all cardio endurance. I work out on a NordiTack and cycle. I am trying to put intervals of sprints into both of my cardio works outs to hopefully increase strength and endurance. I hope that some community members that might have some knowledge on this can point me in the right direction. Help need an exercise physiologist!!!


Later, Peace & Out

"We all can't be Ed Viesturs"
post #6 of 9
Fast,
For the past eight years I have made an annual trip to Montana. The past two years I have actually prepared. This year I spent hours on the stairmaster which I believe helped my stamina tremendously. I also did squats(on a machine to save my knees) at low weight and high reps-somewhere between 5-6 sets with 15-20 reps which increased my strength. Mountain biking also played a huge role too. Just some ideas to think about for your trip.
Dennis
post #7 of 9
Just a quick thing I've heard for Altitude. Supplement Coenzyme Q10 (CO-Q10) is supposed to increase O2 levels in your system thus reducing effects of altitude. Used Q10 for my last ski trip and honestly felt no effects. I knew to drink lots of water and I was coming from flat Sea level. Honestly can't say that the Q10 was the reason, but sure didn't hurt any.

------------------
Powder to the People...
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Needin Snow,

My wife the nurse has done some recent reading on Coenzyme Q10 (CO-Q10) and it is recommended by some experts for peole who suffer from mitral valve prolapse. She is of the opinion that it does help raise O2 levels and just like chicken soup it "Can't Hoyt".

It is sold in GNC and Shakely has a product also. I am going to look into it. Thanks for the tip.


Later, Peace & Out.


<FONT size="1">

[This message has been edited by Fast1EV (edited April 16, 2000).]</FONT>
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Tag,

Brought this one back up because of our discussion on the Lakeview Chairlift at Alpine Meadows. Hope this helps and sorry that I could not make the "Bears Summit" in CO.

Later

ED
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