EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Vail closing week, demo skis and instruction
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Vail closing week, demo skis and instruction

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm 6' 2", 185 lb, intermediate skier, about a level 7 based on the scale I've seen on this board. I've had about 15 days total skiing several different places this season, which is more than I've ever had before, and I've gotten a taste for it and am working to advance my abilities. Aside from some boot problems which have resulted in a few not so good days and down time I've been loving the journey. (Working with a boot fitter and think/hope I have that end straightened out.)

I demo'd a pair of Salomon XW Fury 170's at Heavenly last week - 4" fresh snow the night before. For me the Furys turned well and felt very stable going fast down groomers, and went right through the skied up crud off piste like it wasn't even there. I spent a good part of the morning working on controlled turns sking under the chair lifts, and in the afternoon skied the trees off the Olympic Express lift with my girlfriend (who's a much better skier and prefers powder and trees, and bumps). First time for me skiing trees! The combination of soft/slow conditions, relatively open and moderately sloped terrain, and my confidence that day on the Furys left me with my best day skiing ever, and a better appreciation of why so many people spend so many of their waking hours dreaming of getting back out there!  ;-)

Along that line I'm trying to make it to Vail for a few days the week of April 12th, and after speaking with a couple folks and reading a lot of comments on this board am interested in demoing a pair of Line Prophet 100 skis, and also the Salomon Furys again. I've never really had a good opportunity to experience true powder skiing, but it sounds like the Prophet 100s could really help me there, yet work reasonably well on groomers and moguls. I understand the Furys would require more of me on powder, but they felt so good that one day I'd like to see if I have the same experience again. One way or another I have a powder learning curve to work through, and people have learned to ski powder on skinnier skis than the Furys.

So, can anyone recommend a place in Vail where I could demo both of these skis?

Also, I'm interested in getting some instruction while in Vail. Ideally I could go out in the morning and ski for an hour or two, loosen up and get acquainted with the skis I'm using that day, then connect with someone for a couple of hours, and finish the day continuing to work on things.

Based on where I'm at anyone in particular I might seek out?

Thanks in advance for any feedback.
post #2 of 26
 It looks like you're getting a lot out of your ski experience.
Here is a link to the EpicSki Instructors Wiki, which has a few selections from Vail.
http://www.epicski.com/wiki/epicski-instructor-and-coach-listing#user_colorado
If you don't find what you're looking for on that list, you may want to shoot Bob Barnes a PM and ask him if he knows anyone at Vail, because he works for Vail Resorts, based out of Keystone.

Good luck, and don't forget to report back on your Trip!
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
...you may want to shoot Bob Barnes a PM and ask him if he knows anyone at Vail, because he works for Vail Resorts, based out of Keystone.
 

BB is top shelf especially rock’n this chrome bling a week ago [Bob, I’ve been looking for an opportunity to post this pic ]:
P3070011.JPG


OP; you can also PM local Vail instructor and Epic’s own vail snopro.  Ric also has his own special bling…but it’s hard to take pictures of his rocket fueled base wax   

post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Appreciate the suggestions, folks! I'll start with Bob and see if he can get me lined up.

Thanks!
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

I'm 6' 2", 185 lb, intermediate skier, about a level 7 based on the scale I've seen on this board. I've had about 15 days total skiing several different places this season, which is more than I've ever had before, and I've gotten a taste for it and am working to advance my abilities. Aside from some boot problems which have resulted in a few not so good days and down time I've been loving the journey. (Working with a boot fitter and think/hope I have that end straightened out.)

I demo'd a pair of Salomon XW Fury 170's at Heavenly last week - 4" fresh snow the night before. For me the Furys turned well and felt very stable going fast down groomers, and went right through the skied up crud off piste like it wasn't even there. I spent a good part of the morning working on controlled turns sking under the chair lifts, and in the afternoon skied the trees off the Olympic Express lift with my girlfriend (who's a much better skier and prefers powder and trees, and bumps). First time for me skiing trees! The combination of soft/slow conditions, relatively open and moderately sloped terrain, and my confidence that day on the Furys left me with my best day skiing ever, and a better appreciation of why so many people spend so many of their waking hours dreaming of getting back out there!  ;-)

Along that line I'm trying to make it to Vail for a few days the week of April 12th, and after speaking with a couple folks and reading a lot of comments on this board am interested in demoing a pair of Line Prophet 100 skis, and also the Salomon Furys again. I've never really had a good opportunity to experience true powder skiing, but it sounds like the Prophet 100s could really help me there, yet work reasonably well on groomers and moguls. I understand the Furys would require more of me on powder, but they felt so good that one day I'd like to see if I have the same experience again. One way or another I have a powder learning curve to work through, and people have learned to ski powder on skinnier skis than the Furys.

So, can anyone recommend a place in Vail where I could demo both of these skis?

Also, I'm interested in getting some instruction while in Vail. Ideally I could go out in the morning and ski for an hour or two, loosen up and get acquainted with the skis I'm using that day, then connect with someone for a couple of hours, and finish the day continuing to work on things.

Based on where I'm at anyone in particular I might seek out?

Thanks in advance for any feedback.


 


Demoing ski's is a good idea, however find the ski's you like, that fits your style of skiing and stick with them for several (more that a week) days - Skiing is kind of like golf, it's hard to buy a game, maybe tiny things here and there, but buying a game is next to impossible. 15 days a season ain't gonna git r done. Neither is 2 hours of instruction JMO.
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve2ski View Post

Demoing ski's is a good idea, however find the ski's you like, that fits your style of skiing and stick with them for several (more that a week) days - Skiing is kind of like golf, it's hard to buy a game, maybe tiny things here and there, but buying a game is next to impossible. 15 days a season ain't gonna git r done. Neither is 2 hours of instruction JMO.

You're entitled to your opinion, but I don't think much of it.

I'm not looking to "buy a game". Working with the time and money constraints that constitute my reality I'm trying to hone in on some appropriate equipment and occasional instruction so as to facilitate a better skiing experience.

I had a tip from a ski instructor friend of a friend that made a huge difference in my skiing. Something passed along in 2 minutes in a condo after dinner. Do I think I'm going to come out of an hour lesson skiing powder like a pro? No. Do I think a good instructor could watch me ski and pass along some things to focus and work on that could make a huge difference in how I ski powder? In a single lesson?

I certainly hope so.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post




You're entitled to your opinion, but I don't think much of it.

I'm not looking to "buy a game". Working with the time and money constraints that constitute my reality I'm trying to hone in on some appropriate equipment and occasional instruction so as to facilitate a better skiing experience.

I had a tip from a ski instructor friend of a friend that made a huge difference in my skiing. Something passed along in 2 minutes in a condo after dinner. Do I think I'm going to come out of an hour lesson skiing powder like a pro? No. Do I think a good instructor could watch me ski and pass along some things to focus and work on that could make a huge difference in how I ski powder? In a single lesson?

I certainly hope so.

 


Enjoy your game
post #8 of 26
April is going to probably have conditions that soften up quite a bit as the day goes on.  A wide ski can make skiing soft corn and slush a real pleasure, especially if they have a good wax on them.  Anyway, its good to mix up the quiver a bit and a Prophete 100 is still pretty versatile.  If you are going after instruction, the tool of choice would depend on what you want to work on.  If off-piste work is where you want to focus, that Line ski may be a good choice.  If you're planning to work on bumps or turn refinements, I would stay with something under 80 mm and an appropriate shape and flex.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve2ski View Post

 Skiing is kind of like golf, it's hard to buy a game, maybe tiny things here and there, but buying a game is next to impossible. 15 days a season ain't gonna git r done. Neither is 2 hours of instruction JMO.

I strongly disagree.  This is sort of like saying if you don't run 30-40 miles a week, don't run at all; unless you play tennis five days a week, don't bother lifting a racket.  Most of us ski (and/or do these other sports) for the fun of it, not to be a "contender".  I don't hear jc saying he wants to make the team for the next winter Olympics.  He just wants to get better at skiing.  15 days a season and a couple hours of instruction puts him in the upper 5% of the skiing population.  
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

April is going to probably have conditions that soften up quite a bit as the day goes on.  A wide ski can make skiing soft corn and slush a real pleasure, especially if they have a good wax on them.  Anyway, its good to mix up the quiver a bit and a Prophete 100 is still pretty versatile.  If you are going after instruction, the tool of choice would depend on what you want to work on.  If off-piste work is where you want to focus, that Line ski may be a good choice.  If you're planning to work on bumps or turn refinements, I would stay with something under 80 mm and an appropriate shape and flex.

Appreciate the feedback. I realize the conditions can vary that late in the season, with powder being possible, but perhaps unlikely.

I live back east and purchased some several year old Volkls (71 underfoot) cheap to have something to ski with at the small mountain within driving distance which is typically hardpack/icy. Allows me to avoid renting gear, and also something to practice tuning and waxing on. Perfectly fine to learn on in those conditions.

For the times when I can get out west if possible I would like to try to have one pair of skis I can continue to improve on in all conditions I might encounter. The Prophet 100 seems to be that kind of ski for some folks, so I'd really like to check it out if I can find a place to demo in Vail. The Fury is closer to that 80 limit, and as mentioned previously I had a pretty good experience with it, so I would like to give it a ride again. Also thinking I might be able to catch a good end of season deal on a pair of demo skis.

BTW, I tracked some Gulf wax down and have a few pounds ($3.50/lb in grocery strores) stashed on both coasts. I've heard it could be good for warmer/softer/slushier spring skiing conditions. Any opinion on that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

I strongly disagree.  This is sort of like saying if you don't run 30-40 miles a week, don't run at all; unless you play tennis five days a week, don't bother lifting a racket.  Most of us ski (and/or do these other sports) for the fun of it, not to be a "contender".  I don't hear jc saying he wants to make the team for the next winter Olympics.  He just wants to get better at skiing.  15 days a season and a couple hours of instruction puts him in the upper 5% of the skiing population.  

Thanks. Always nice to hear the voice of reason.
post #11 of 26
Troy's Ski Shop in Vail had the Prophet 100's to demo - give them a call.
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
I called, spoke with Troy, and he does have them. Hopefully he'll still have them come week of 4/12.  ;-)

Thanks!
post #13 of 26
jc-ski, be sure to look into the forum Special Deals for EpicSki Members  You can probably buy new equipment now for what you are thinking to spend on demos.  Scott (Dawgcatching), and SierraJim are both very knowledgeable and can help guide you in selecting equipment, and getting the best possible buy.   Scott is blowing out 2010 leftovers, and Jim has specials at the Start Haus
post #14 of 26
Steve2Ski -
Ya know, we all start something new at some point in our lives - it's crap when you don't give a fellow avid skier in training a good word.
Any sport needs its' cheerleaders, not some grinch   who discourages the effort.
Get a life.
And, to JC - you go for it, guy! Have a blast! You're right, it's for the sheer fun of it!  
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

jc-ski, be sure to look into the forum Special Deals for EpicSki Members  You can probably buy new equipment now for what you are thinking to spend on demos.  Scott (Dawgcatching), and SierraJim are both very knowledgeable and can help guide you in selecting equipment, and getting the best possible buy.   Scott is blowing out 2010 leftovers, and Jim has specials at the Start Haus

Appreciate you pointing all that out. The skis I'm interested in are in the Start Haus list, plus I'll be relocating to the Bay Area at some point, so I'll probably focus on working with Jim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by windy View Post

And, to JC - you go for it, guy! Have a blast! You're right, it's for the sheer fun of it!

This is the first year of my life when I've found myself wishing the warm spring weather wouldn't come quite so soon. I guess I must be hooked.  ;-)

Thanks!
post #16 of 26
Heck, I'm lucky to get 12 days a year and slowly, but surely I'm improving.  I've picked up skiing tips from this website that have helped me.  Each day on a slope is a learning experiance; c'est la vie.
post #17 of 26
 the addiction has just begun guys.  I started that way in my 30's, now I ski close to 60 times a year.

There's nothing like it, and the better you get the more fun it is!
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

I strongly disagree.  This is sort of like saying if you don't run 30-40 miles a week, don't run at all; unless you play tennis five days a week, don't bother lifting a racket.  Most of us ski (and/or do these other sports) for the fun of it, not to be a "contender".  I don't hear jc saying he wants to make the team for the next winter Olympics.  He just wants to get better at skiing.  15 days a season and a couple hours of instruction puts him in the upper 5% of the skiing population.  

Woah, easy there, big guy! Steve2ski didn't actually say "don't ski". He simply highlighted the reality of progression in sports. 

It's easy to progress when you're new to a sport. As a beginner, you could improve even if only doing the sport a few times a year. Once you're an intermediate, your gains are going to slow down. A ski professional like Bode Miller needs to train hard every day just to maintain. The op probably fits somewhere in between the two extremes. Given the op has just experienced powder and glades, I suspect he's closer to a 6. In such a case he will probably continue to see improvements at 15 days a season for another couple of years. At the advanced level, 15 days a season might be enough to maintain one's ability, particularly if a lot of those days are sequential. For me, things start to "click" again about 10 days into the season.  

Remember--it's all about fun! Nobody says there's a rule that you must commit x days to skiing. I just hate to see skiers get frustrated when they plateau. I play tennis 15 days a year. I will never progress beyond the intermediate level, no matter how of those days are spent in lessons. However, without all the lessons I've taken, I'd surely be a really sloppy beginner still! And I have fun bouncing the ball across the court. 

Equipment can make a huge difference. The op's on the right track with getting his boots fitted. Also, he'll probably see a difference if transitioning from beginner/intermediate skis to advanced skis. Lastly, lessons definitely can make a major difference, especially if there's a technique issue holding you back (we've all gone through it!).  

Enjoy! 
post #19 of 26
Met -- I  agree with many of your points.  I just think most of us can't go all or nothing on every sport -- i.e., strive for Bode's level or don't ski at all.  Not that you're saying that -- but I thought Steve2 was.  Bode needs coaching and practice every day to stay at the top.  Would I benefit from more instruction, more ski days, and better equipment?  Sure, but falling short from an optimal level (whatever that is) won't stop me from skiing, and shouldn't stop JC.  You said you play tennis 15 days a year and are plateaued at intermediate... but you still play!   (Me too, BTW, but I've resolved that this summer will be my breakthrough season).     
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

Met -- I  agree with many of your points.  I just think most of us can't go all or nothing on every sport -- i.e., strive for Bode's level or don't ski at all.  Not that you're saying that -- but I thought Steve2 was.  Bode needs coaching and practice every day to stay at the top.  Would I benefit from more instruction, more ski days, and better equipment?  Sure, but falling short from an optimal level (whatever that is) won't stop me from skiing, and shouldn't stop JC.  You said you play tennis 15 days a year and are plateaued at intermediate... but you still play!   (Me too, BTW, but I've resolved that this summer will be my breakthrough season).     

Good man, that sounds totally reasonable and realistic. And... just like your tennis breakthrough season, I bet you'll find yourself wanting more snow days anyway ;)
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm glad you folks brought tennis into the conversation, because I've been thinking about tennis and skiing a lot recently, as the former provides me with some potentially relevant reference points. I played a lot when I was a kid growing up, but then completely got away from it for a long time. About a dozen years ago a friend got me going again, and as I eased back in I didn't have any equipment so I tried a bunch of different rackets. The huge, oversized, head heavy ones designed to make the game easier for beginners felt great at first - "Wow! I can really cream the ball by hardly doing anything!" - but as I began to get my feel back I found them difficult to control and ultimately very limiting.

As things progressed I met a high school team player working in a local shop and he and I became regular tennis partners. I distinctly remember thinking the first time I tried hitting with his Wilson Pro Staff 6.0 85 racket "this thing feels like a 2x4!", but eventually I ended up getting one, and the Pro Staff 6.0 has been my only stick since, with one small concession to age - I moved from the 85 to the 95 several years ago. Slightly larger head and just slightly more forgiving overall.

Circumstances have occasionally forced me to play with a different kind of racket, (borrowing one while traveling, etc), and I find that I can adjust after a few minutes and play decently with almost anything, but my strokes are well grooved now for the Pro Staff, and I don't ever give a second thought anymore to buying the latest and greatest racket. I realized/decided a long time ago when it comes to tennis, for me it's not really about the racket at all, it's about being in good shape, and moving well and and staying focused when I play.

As mentioned in the beginning of this thread I demo'd some different skis last month, and was thinking the end of the season would be a good time of year to pick up something more appropriate for western conditions, but now I'm leaning towards flipping that switch off for the time being, forgetting new equipment, and just focusing on skiing.

Earlier this season to avoid renting I picked up a pair of 181cm Axis X skis, and also a pair of 170cm Volkl AX2s. I got them both really cheap, but they're both in very good condition other than a few scratches topside. The Volkls have worked well for me in hardpack/icy conditions, and not surprisingly are easier for me to turn at this point. The K2s have felt very solid going fast on groomers, and plowed through crud/chop really well. They're different but both felt good skiing spring slush. I haven't skied either in powder conditions, but I haven't really skied much in powder conditions, period.

I've been reading through a lot of the powder threads here on Epic and wondering if it might not be such a bad idea to learn to ski powder with a slightly older school ski such as the Axis X, which just a few years ago people were raving about, and using to ski in all kinds of conditions. Is it possible in the long run my skills and abilities might benefit more from that approach, than from getting a short term assist from more modern, fatter skis? Are there some potential parallels to my tennis equipment experience?

Food for thought...

The Wilson racket current world #1 Roger Federer uses is remarkably similar to the now more than 25 year old Pro Staff 6.0 85, which Federer used earlier in his pro career. It's not a "paint job", but very close in size, weight, and balance.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post


...I've been reading through a lot of the powder threads here on Epic and wondering if it might not be such a bad idea to learn to ski powder with a slightly older school ski such as the Axis X, which just a few years ago people were raving about, and using to ski in all kinds of conditions. Is it possible in the long run my skills and abilities might benefit more from that approach, than from getting a short term assist from more modern, fatter skis? Are there some potential parallels to my tennis equipment experience?

Food for thought...

The Wilson racket current world #1 Roger Federer uses is remarkably similar to the now more than 25 year old Pro Staff 6.0 85, which Federer used earlier in his pro career. It's not a "paint job", but very close in size, weight, and balance.

I know exactly what you're saying, and I sort of agree. I too am  a tennis player, and I even used to play with that Pro Staff. Great stick, sorry I sold it. I still play only with more traditional feeling racquets, almost always Yonex. (Flirted with Babolat for a season, but no dice.)

Anyway, my opinion is that it certainly can't hurt. I keep thinking, though, that if you are on vacation and you get a powder day, you want to get your money's worth. I don't know that much about the technicalities of ski technique, far less than I do about tennis technique, so I'm not totally sure about this, but it seems that using a wider traditional ski would still get you what you need without denting your fun for the day whereas going straight to a rockered ski would certainly be fun, but maybe not the best in terms of skill development.

The racquet analogy is good, and I use it myself, but it isn't perfect. A tennis court is always the same size and shape. So is the ball. The surface might change -- and I actually use different shoes (the part that touches the surface) for clay and hard court, and if I got to play on grass more than occasionally, I'd have grass shoes, too -- and obviously the weather changes but only a little bit. Thus, I like to have my tennis equipment dialed in, since consistency and muscle memory is the important thing.

But ski conditions can be very, very different. And your purpose is different. Tennis is almost all about the same type of competition. Almost none of us ski competitively, and even race courses change all the time.

But mainly,  even the pros use different skis for different purposes. Tennis pros don't. They use one racquet, as you know often for many years (using paint jobs when they are supposed to be marketing the NEW thing).  But pro skiers use different skis for different courses, and different purposes. For example, this was yesterday at Vail, and these are not Vonn's race skis:

vonn vail

I'm not sure what they are, but they aren't huge rockered boards, either.
24320_384536011305_8310961305_3743009_2937650_n.jpg

Anyway, enough rambling from me, but I have had many of the same thoughts about tennis and ski equipment ... in fact, it occurred to me that racquets and boots are the better analogy: the top-of-the-line gear is still fairly simple and traditional, yet personalized to the nth degree (with strings and lead weights for racquets), and not let out of their grasp when on airplanes.
post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Appreciate you sharing your thoughts; nice to get another take on things from a fellow tennis player / skier.

Actually had some pretty impressive powder in my neck of the woods yesterday...

powder_tennis.jpg

That's yellow, not white, powder, on a hard, not a clay, court. Heavy pollen week back here in the Southeast!  ;-)

But I digress...

Going forward clearly the main thing is just to ski, ski, ski as much as I can, and that's my plan. When possible I'll try to tag along with better skiers, suck up the good stuff through osmosis, and take a lesson here and there for course correction and insight. Cause I'm a bit of a luddite/romantic/hardhead I'm going to give a shot at learning on those venerable Axis X skis, but if faced with more than a few inches of powder somewhere will probably try to demo something like the Prophet 100s just to get an idea of what they have to offer.

As with all things, time will tell.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Speaking of Vonn and Federer, a quick aside. Hmm.

I did make it out to Vail for closing week, and it was fun (natch!) and interesting. Sunday afternoon a week ago I skied on the Axis X in the Game Creek Bowl. Warm, sunny day, and the stop-start slushy crud took a bit of getting used to, but had a good time on the groomers there and also followed my girlfriend and another friend (both very good skiers) down the bump runs part of the time. Great start to the trip.

Next two days I demo'd the Line Prophet 100 courtesy Troy's Ski Shop (great place, nice folks). Monday that seemed like a mistake, as it was a typical spring day: pretty crusty in the morning, reasonably slushy for a few hours, then unreasonably slushy after that (or so it seemed to me). Morning was tough trying to get used to the Prophets skiing firm groomers, but once things softened up they felt a lot better, and I actually had a pretty good time on them in the slush in the middle of the day.

Still, not really the best conditions for demo'ing the Prophets, but since there was a chance of new snow Monday night I reserved them for another day, and that turned out to be a good call, as there was indeed 4-5 inches Tuesday morning. "Dust on crust" as my girlfriend called it, and on her Head IM 78's she was pushing through the dust and skiing the crust for the most part, but on the Prophets I was floating up on top. We did Powerline and other stuff off chairs 3/4, and dropped into Northwoods for a bit, and I definitely got a feel for what a wider ski has to offer in powder.

Rest of the week didn't really have any fresh snow and I went back to the Axis X and just worked on coming to terms with the different daily conditions on groomers and some of the bump runs, again mostly off chairs 3/4, occasionally dropping down into the Sun bowls and runs off Avanti or Riva Ridge, mix of blues and blacks. One day around 4pm saw a fellow (not a whippersnapper unless he'd gone prematurely grey) skinning up lower Riva, just about to head up Tourist Trap as we went by! Now that's a workout! Hats off to that dude, whoever he is!  ;-)

It was a funny week, as a good part of the time to some degree I felt uncomfortable/unbalanced, sometimes when just doing yet another run down a groomer. The spring slush/crud was challenging for me, and I felt I was always on my guard and a little tense skiing through it. Closing day our friend, a Colorado native who's skied all his life, hooked a ski coming down a simple stretch and it wrenched his knee pretty bad, ( not bad enough to keep him away from the BBQ and pond skimming, though! Heh heh ;-), so I feel a little less wimpy and somewhat vindicated for being cautious and not becoming complacent.

The best day for me by far came after a morning of skiing when I could just not get comfortable, everything felt way too challenging. (Day after the fresh snow, when I had gone back to the Axis X from the Prophets.) I was extremely frustrated, and thinking seriously about calling it quits and leaving the mountain, when I got pissed and decided I was gonna bull my way through. Sounds dramatic, but literally huffing and puffing to work up a head of steam I spread my legs a bit and forced myself to get way forward over the skis and really keep my arms forward and upper body facing forward, trying to work the skis together but allowing them to work independently and absorb terrain variations as necessary. And as I came down off the chair I bounced up and down on both skis as I approached whatever it was I was going to ski, and that really seemed to help me get balanced and my legs adjusted to dealing with whatever was underneath.

It worked, and for a while I was in the groove and skiing over crusty and chunky stuff with a confidence I hadn't experienced before. Never could make it all the way down in a single clean pass, but forced myself to run the S. Look Ma moguls several times, and after some stop/starting near the top was able to run the lower half of the bumps and the bumpy runout below on the way back to the chairs pretty comfortably. For me it was a healthy step forward, and it felt great!

Although there were lots of moments of frustration, and I never did get confident enough to head to the way back bowls with my friends, all in all had a really great time, feel like I continued to progress as a skier, and am already looking forward to next ski season!

Cheers!   ;-)
post #25 of 26
Glad Troy's got you on the P100's - they are my everyday skis.  Not the best in the early morning coral reef Sun AM - but in semi soft - fine and Sat AM - money.  The have plenty of sidecut, so if it is semi-soft just lay them over and they will turn. The tails look long mounted on the line - but you get used to them.

The red dust layer was a drag - literally. 
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

For example, this was yesterday at Vail, and these are not Vonn's race skis:
vonn vail

I'm not sure what they are, but they aren't huge rockered boards, either.


Just happened upon this video, apparently from the same day...

Lindsey Vonn Skis Powder with Warren Miller Entertainment at Vail

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Vail closing week, demo skis and instruction