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Airline Baggage Size Restrictions - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Ever thought of putting your boots on, then your skis on, and entering the plane this way?  Of course the airline will be unhappy they aren't getting your $135 each way
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post

Last month AirTran tagged me another $45 for my bag because it exceeded a total of 72 in. when measuring its height, width, and length) I had flown on Southwest in Jan. with the same bag and there was no issue with the dimensions as well as no charge for the bag.

Taking US Air out to Denver the end of the month and I see on their website the max. dimensions for the checked bag can't exceed 61 inches, or its another $100 each way on top of the $35 for the second checked bag.
Prior to my Airtran incident with my bag I thought falsely you just had to keep the bag under 50lbs.

So, I see on US Air that you can carry on a bag and a personal item(computer) . The bag can't exceed 40 lbs. and I think the dimensions said under 40 inches for the carry on.

I guess I will need to put my boots in the carry on bag with the laptop and be sure I meet the size dimensions for this bag. My clothing bag (previously a big Atomic Team Bag) exceeds 72 inches and I'll need to use a bag that meets US Air dimension requirements. Travel with a ski tube. Interestingly if I understood correctly, the ski tube or ski bag can exceed 50 lbs. on AirTran. Plus and I'm confused on this , a ski bag and a boot bag count as 1 piece of checked luggae?

Its bad enough you end up paying $60 a way for checked bags, but God Forbid if you exceed the dimensions of the bag, better hang on to your wallet!  My stuff always shows up looking like an elephant stepped on it anyway. Biggest Pet Peeve is the TSA guys that can't put the ski tube upper and lower part together right and the tube separates in transit. Plus they order you to leave when you ask them if they are familar with how to put the tube back together!

Used to be travelling with luggae was a hassle, now its a major expense and you need to knwo the baggage rules for the carrier you're taking. When US Air tore the wheels off my big Atomic bag, they told me they couldn't be responsible for that type of damage!

 

I have to believe resort rentals have to be getting a shot in the arm with the cost of checked baggage with the airlines.

post #32 of 49
I don't get the issues here. I fly United and Continental, no issues ever with my sport tube or my carry on transpack. Not once. I do 4-6 trips per season. I used to ship via UPS but since its free on the airline, why pay?

BTW- Sierraskis has dakine concourse padded bags for $52

http://www.sierrasnowboard.com/Dakine-Concourse-Double-Ski-Bag-Snowboard-bags.asp



Oh the TSA- yeah there seems to be a definite issue with them not being able to line up two holes and put the lock back into both....  Should tell you something,,,,  Maybe they coould do it if it were 1 round hole and  1 square hole... they seem to be better at that kind of thing!
post #33 of 49
Thread Starter 

Good heads up on the Dakine bag. That looks like a better way for me to pack things.

post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I don't get the issues here. I fly United and Continental, no issues ever with my sport tube or my carry on transpack. Not once. I do 4-6 trips per season. I used to ship via UPS but since its free on the airline, why pay?
 
 How do you figure free?  I flew Southwest to Tahoe in January year for a six-day trip.  I carried on my boots, checked my suitcase with my ski clothes and street clothes, and checked my skis.  I paid baggage fees for the suitcase and skis both ways, total cost  to check the skis:  $70.

My wife and I flew Delta to SLC in February for a 10 day trip.  We both checked a suitcase and a ski bag.  Total cost:  $25 for the suitcase, $35 for the skis.  That's $35 for the skis, x 2, x round trip = $140 to check our skis.

We're flying to Colorado next week on United.  Would have been the same cost as the Delta except that I bought a SporTube for both skis and shipped them one way with the United/FedEx deal currently available for $25.  The return will be outside of the time of the special, but should only cost us $55.

If you can fly on United and Continental and not pay baggage fees, please let us know how.
post #35 of 49
TomF, how did you end up paying baggage fees on Southwest?  My experience that they check up to two bags for free.  I looked into sending my skis ahead last month with UPS and the fee was so high that the airline fees were way cheaper.  Is there a special rate to ask for when shipping skis?
post #36 of 49
finndog,  are you an elite member by any chance?? 
post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pwdrhnd View Post

TomF, how did you end up paying baggage fees on Southwest?  My experience that they check up to two bags for free.  I looked into sending my skis ahead last month with UPS and the fee was so high that the airline fees were way cheaper.  Is there a special rate to ask for when shipping skis?

Sorry, my mistake.  I flew on Delta and they charged $35 for the second bag (skis) each way, total of $70.
post #38 of 49
What I wonder here is: why do people take so much stuff with them?  It seems crazy that there would be a need for a single skier (and I'm talking singles - not families here, which doesn't apply to my situation so I'm not familiar) to have a ski bag, a suitcase/boot bag, carry-on and a "personal item" on a ski trip (unless there's a business trip or major family event held in conjunction, where all bets are off).

My packing strategy is typically:

1. Ski bag (High Sierra padded bag) with skis and poles and basic tuning supplies (High Sierra padded bag).

2. Rolling carry-on (High Sierra AT3) with boots and clothing inside (including ski pants, base layers, underwear, socks, shirts, ski gloves, goggles and other clothing miscellaney - it all fits just fine).  The secret to the clothing is to use a lot of thin layers to stay warm (which also works better on the slopes, providing more mobility - wool and tech fabrics work wonders).

3. Small backpack (the one that came with the AT3) or courier bag (if I take my larger laptop) with laptop, book, chargers/cables, toiletries and snacks, which rides under the seat in front of me.  My helmet is buckled to this bag and can be detached once on board the aircraft.

I wear onto the plane my jeans/non-ski pants, non-skiing footwear, fleece middle layer, skiing shell, non-skiing hat (usually in the pocket of the shell).  The jacket gets placed in the overhead, stuffed into my helmet (when possible).

This setup is low-profile, simple to pull off, very mobile in the airport, and allows me to keep my boots with me on all but the tiniest of puddle-hopper aircraft without exceeding any airline baggage regulations.  I worked it out over years of traveling to ski races and needing to keep compact.  If anybody wants pictures of this, I'd be happy to share.

Just my $0.02 on the subject.
post #39 of 49
Since I'm elite on Delta, I can check 3 overweight bags for free (so I don't have first hand experience with solving the airline baggage fee problem). That said, I know if you tip the sky caps at the curb, they'll often ignore the "combined weight of ski bag and boot bag < 50lbs" rule. On my last trip, the sky cap mentioned he was going to waive the rule for me (wink) until I mentioned that he didn't need to due to my elite status.Tip-at-curb strategy may not work at curb at SLC (or other airport that sees lots and lots of skis). Come to think of it, I don't recall seeing any sky caps at SLC...do they have curb service there?

FYI on SportTubes:
* A "2 pair" SportTube w/ 2 pair skis and nothing else weighed 48lbs. Soft ski bags are much lighter.
* The SportTube has a stated max length of 183cm, but I fit a pair of 190 Gotamas and 185 EP Pros in it and was still able to close it (barely).
post #40 of 49
My travel strategy, when traveling alone:

* 1 padded ski bag with 2 pairs of skis - $35 to check it on the way there, ship it UPS back (costs $25)

* 1 rolling carry on. Contains: ski boots, 1 pair base layer thermals, 1 pair ski socks, 1 set top and bottom fleece, laptop, goggles, gloves, ski pants, camera

* 1 medium upright rolling bag. Contains all my clothes (minus what's in the carry on), helmet, medicine, supplements, etc, etc. I don't like wearing stinky stuff and a lot of hotels don't do laundry so I bring 1 pair of base layer thermals, socks, underwear for each day I'll be on the slopes. Otherwise, this bag could be smaller. The combined cost of the stuff in this bag is usually under $700.

* ski jacket, worn on my body on the plane

The strategy for the most part is concentrating as many of the expensive and essential items into my carry-on. Why?

#1) When I go to Big Sky or a small place like that, the regional jet (typically a CRJ200 or 717) that goes from the major hub (denver, salt lake, etc) to the tiny airport is usually not designed for skiier type baggage setup. Therefore the amount of baggage all the skiiers bring exceeds what the plane can hold. About 50% of the time either my ski bag or my big bag or both don't make it there on my flight and has to come on a later flight, and they deliver it to my hotel either that night or the next day. This way if that happens all I have to do is rent a set of demos for that day only and everything else I need to ski I have with me. The same type of thing happens at larger airports, too. At Geneva, I didn't get my skis for 2 days. Rented a pair and hit the slopes.

#2) airline lost baggage replacement policy. Usually caps out at $400-$500 per bag. My one pair of Spyder pants costs $700 and combined value of everything in my carry-on is probably over $3k. Needless to say if this bag was checked instead of carried on I'd be at a huge risk. I'm already exposing myself a lot by checking the ski bag, I might start shipping it UPS both directions and insuring it - insurance is just $1 per $100

#3) finding a pair of ski boots that fits you perfectly is a huge pain in the ass. It took me a long time to find a pair I liked and it's no longer in production. Renting boots? No way, jose. If I lose my boots, I'm going to have a very bad time. Another reason I take a bulky heavy item like this and squeeze it in my rolling carry on. If you have the carry on that's the largest allowed size (they make them EXACTLY to airline dimensions) you can put the boots one pointed up one pointed down like a puzzle piece and still have plenty of room for all your other stuff.
post #41 of 49
At SLC last night the Delta agent stated that the <= 50 lbs was for net of (ski bag + boot bag).

I said I had been doing ski trips for 20 years and had never heard that.( I always take two pairs
of skis, carry on boots going, check boots coming home.)

She said "thats the rule last year and thats the rule this year"

Thanks to a complimentary upgrade, I was able to check three bags free.
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by docbrad66 View Post

At SLC last night the Delta agent stated that the <= 50 lbs was for net of (ski bag + boot bag).

I said I had been doing ski trips for 20 years and had never heard that.( I always take two pairs
of skis, carry on boots going, check boots coming home.)

She said "thats the rule last year and thats the rule this year"

Thanks to a complimentary upgrade, I was able to check three bags free.


 That has been the case for a while. Another reason to carry-on your boots. 
post #43 of 49
Heads up for those that like to carry on their boot bags.  Due to all the airlines adding and raising the cost to check bags many many people are trying to carry a lot more on board.  Analysts are predicting this will lead to ludicrous restrictions on what folks can carry on. 


Should the TSA regulate carry-on bag size?

The proposal is to allows all bags to be as much as 22 inches by 18 inches by 10 inches in external dimensions.

That's going to rule out carrying on most boot bags as they exceed 10" on at least one side.  This isn't the first time airlines have tried to go in this direction.  But we shall see if it flies this time with the TSA pushing for it.

The point is that you won't be able to avoid the checked bag fees unless you travel extremely light.  The size requirements used to just be a total L+W+H<50"-54" depending on the airline, domestic or ITL, etc..  But now having exact max for each dimension will result in just about every practical boot bag I've ever had no longer qualifying as a legit carry on.
post #44 of 49
Thread Starter 

This whole thing with pying for bags , bag size restrictions etc, etc. is getting nuts. I'm for the airlines setting their prices based on including what they  apply as the cost of shipping bags with the customer. Who's flying that isn't checking baggage? I don't have any stats but I would believe most travellers check bags. As for us skiers , yes we're taking more baggage with us, but guess what, we wouldn't be flying unless we were skiing, that is , the ski trip resulted in buying an airline ticket.

Maybe the airlines will take it to the point, and I think they may have already with some skiers , not the die hards, that its just so much of a hassle and expense now, I'll stay home and do something else.

How does Southwest do it? We need to fly Southwest when we can and support a skier friendly airline with a fair baggage policy. I had lunch a couple of weeks ago with a guy who manages a ski shop and he said he believes their ski sales have been effected by customers who said the heck with paying and checking ski bags and rent instead at the resort.

post #45 of 49
 I have a double ski bag.  I fit my boots, skis, poles, helmet, ski pants, socks, underwear, 2 pairs of googles, etc. . .  enough stuff for a week of skiing in the one bag.  Yes, that includes ski boots.    I took the advice of a poster and wrap the edges in pipe foam so they don't slice any clothes and wrap the bindings in bubble wrap.  Total weight is about 43 lbs.  I walk onto the plane with a laptop bag and ski jacket or a small backpack and ski jacket.  

Key #1.  pack light.  Key #2.  Pack light.  www.onebag.com

As long as I fly American, no problems and no fees!  Then again, I earned 75,000 BIS miles last year.  (But in Seat) for those of you not on flyertalk or a similar website.
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by envgeo View Post

 I have a double ski bag.  I fit my boots, skis, poles, helmet, ski pants, socks, underwear, 2 pairs of googles, etc. . .  enough stuff for a week of skiing in the one bag.  Yes, that includes ski boots.    I took the advice of a poster and wrap the edges in pipe foam so they don't slice any clothes and wrap the bindings in bubble wrap.  Total weight is about 43 lbs.  I walk onto the plane with a laptop bag and ski jacket or a small backpack and ski jacket.  

You are asking for a world of trouble.  When the airline loses or delays your only ski bag, you're going to miss some ski days or will have to go buy all that gear on the mountain.  Smart thing is to check your skis and backup gear, but carry on the essentials you'd need to ski on rental skis, which means boots, pants, jacket, goggles, base layers, socks, helmet etc.  There's a reason this is the strategy adopted by most folks on Epic -- I think we all have been screwed over by lost luggage at some point.  It's pretty common, especially flying into skiing destinations where cargo holds get overwhelmed with luggage and the big stuff (ski bags) gets left behind.
post #47 of 49
It's not just the expense of bags, though that's out of control. And it's not helping airlines, either.

http://www.portfolio.com/views/columns/seat-2B/2009/09/29/baggage-fees-hurting-airlines-bottom-line

It's not just the hassle of moving around an airport with your ski bag/case plus other stuff, though what in the world was Denver thinking when they put the ski bag claim upstairs and passenger pickup downstairs ... that was a scary escalator ride

It's mostly how likely the airport and TSA are to screw the pooch.
post #48 of 49
I just got back last night from my Colorado ski trip and I'm totally sold on the idea of shipping your equipment via FedEx or UPS.

As I related in an earlier post, for a recent Colorado ski trip I flew from San Diego to Colorado Springs via United.  Due to a United/FedEx promo good during our outbound trip, I was able to ship both my and my wife's skis, poles, and a pouch of tuning tools (47#) in a SporTube Series 2 (double) ski case for $25.  FedEx picked up our skis at 2:00 PM on a Wednesday and they arrived at my sister-in-law's at 10:00 AM the next day, far earlier than we arrived at 7:30 PM. 

The zipper on my suitcase got trashed returning from our Utah trip in February and while it made it to Colorado Springs OK, the zipper came off when I went to close my suitcase before driving up to Breckenridge.  I borrowed one of my sister-in-law's suitcases for the ski trip and when we returned, we packed all of our ski clothing into a box (30#) and took both the box and the SporTube to FedEx and shipped them home for $55.  With our remaining clothes in my wife's suitcase we saved on one checked bag ($25) and checking the skis ($35) for a total net savings of $5, but no hassle of lugging the skis around the airports.  The return FedEx shipment is due to arrive tomorrow.
 
 
post #49 of 49
Now they are starting to charge for carry ons too

Spirit Airlines to charge $45 for carry-on luggage

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