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What's the best type of ski for spring - slush conditions ??? - Page 3

post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

 I just found my answer - I demo'd the new 2011 Fischer Watea 94 (I think they're structurally and dimensionally the same as the 2010's) and they were absolutely great in thick spring snow ! Loved them ! Fastest, livliest  skis I've used on this type of snow and still feeling very stable and in control.  I also demo'd the new 2010 Head Peak 88 Fluid Ride, and for me, they came in 2nd in the spring snow category.  They both worked great in spring snow / semi-slush, but the Watea 94's inspired more confidence at higher speeds.  Now my next post is "How do I buy a pair without my wife finding out?"
The answer: Take a breath and don't buy them until you've tried something at/over 100 mm. If you liked the 94's in slush, you'll like the 101's (or a half dozen others) just as much or better, and they'll handle deeper snow at speed even better. IMO 94 mm is a good frontside/general purpose 50/50 width for out west. It's not a chop or slush width. 
post #62 of 69
Here is a short video of some Spring skiing in slush and wet corn snow at Killington a couple days ago on 75mm wide underfoot SOFT comfortable Dynastar Legends - a very nice ski for bumping around the slush and corn piles! That day was also my 100th day skiing on Kneebindings. My buddy who shot this video and I were both skiing in our Hawaiian shirts...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnI5So6HIcQ
post #63 of 69
Now that is one great video...
post #64 of 69
Thanks for the compliment dustyfog - it was sure a fun ski day, especially skiing with my buddy in gorgeous warm Spring snow conditions!

Here is another short video taken the very next day in the continuing warm Spring conditions at Killington, but this time my buddy Mat H is doing a great job following and filming me from behind with a handheld camera in order to help me with some movement improvements that I'm working on. The conditions are slush and wet corn snow piles, and I am skiing on the same 165cm long Dynastar Legend 4800 skis that are 75mm underfoot, have a 15m radius and are SOFT and fun to ski on in Spring snow conditions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwoRzViCvYI

PS: We skipped our Hawaiian shirts, as they were sweaty from the day before.
post #65 of 69
I love spring snow. Its great hero snow to me. And just about any ski with a proper tune will  work pretty good there are not really bad choices, but I do have some preferences.

IMO, all around medium to stiff "mid-fat" skis 85-95 underfoot is my prefered spring ski and works as well as anything in soft slopy stuff and have the least drawbacks. 

Narrower skis <80mm tend to get bogged down and wallow in rotten snow. Also tend to be too turny.

Skis that are superfat have too broad a contact patch. Spring snow is dense and super fat skis ride harsh with less suspension. Also the contact patch on the snow is broader and this wider area = more sensitive to tune and suction when the skis run flat. Tune sensitivity is especially for rockered skis becuase the contact patch is wider and shorter.
Edited by tromano - 4/7/10 at 1:18pm
post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

The conditions are slush and wet corn snow piles, and I am skiing on the same 165cm long Dynastar Legend 4800 skis that are 75mm underfoot, have a 15m radius and are SOFT and fun to ski on in Spring snow conditions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwoRzViCvYI
 

I have the exact same ski, a couple years older (based on the graphics), 172cm. I was also skiing this weekend in extremely warm slushy conditions. I like the flex of this ski in the bumps, and in softer snow that's not too deep. However, on Saturday, when it was SO warm, I was actually thinking that I did NOT like it so much. The reason is that the heavy snow seemed to bully the tips of the skis excessivly - as you say, they are soft. I think I would have liked a ski that was a bit wider - to ride up over the slush piles better - and (especially) a bit stiffer, to maintain a consistent arc even if it means pushing some heavy snow out of the way.
post #67 of 69
I love my K2 PE's on soft spring bumps, and they do just fine surfing through the puddles on the way back to the base lodge.

Of course, I only ski eastern spring slush, I'm sure western spring slush is a completely different matter. 

STE
post #68 of 69

I realize this is a rather old post, but I could not help but add to the topic. I spent 10 years of my career as a professional ski technician. I learned tuning from Bill the Kid and while my knowledge is old it still may apply. I learned a technic for preparing ski bases for soft snow and slush. A normal tune requires a buffing of the wax with a cork to create a smooth running surface. The next time you add wax to your skis with an iron on method, use a horse hair brush running length wise down the ski after you scrap it with a plastic scraper. The bristles add hills and valleys in the wax. These act as a way to channel the water away from the ski, letting it float on top better eliminating the 'suction' effect many describe below. Think of it like a deep tread tire on your car that pushes water away quickly, allowing you contact with the road surface. Hope this helps. 

post #69 of 69

Here are a few ways.

 

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