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A Hike-to-Terrain Ski and Snowboard carrying solution - Page 2

post #31 of 41

I was hiking up to Gold Hill Chute 9 @ Telluride the other day when a gal passed me up using one of these devices. I'll definitely have one when I return next year!

post #32 of 41

I like the simple strap from the AH Ski Patrol.  I carry it behind my neck, under my jacket, like a scarf.  It doesn't take up space in my pockets, and I have 12 feet of rope when I need it.  I worked out a better way to tie it faster than my friends can work their back packs, and I never need to take off my mittens to rig it.  It doesn't have any velcro or buckles to clog with snow either.

If you can do without the fancy AHSP graphics, you can make your own for about $5.

 

BK

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

I purchased the webbing that Highlands patrol sells as a fundraiser for $10, but probably use my backpack 80% of the time.
Mostly because I like to have water and my avi gear.  You just never know who you'll run into and it's always better to be prepared?



I bought one of those as well when I was at the Highlands about 6 years ago.  I bought if from my instructor who I believe is the guy who invented it.

 

Funny thing though, I never have used it.  Still wrapped up just as I got it.  The reason?  When I am out west skiing a big mountain, I ski with a pack with ski attachments that also houses my hydration.  The pack also gives me the ability to bring or shed an extra layer as temps fluctuate during the day.  I can also easily pack a lunch and snacks to maximize my money and ski time.

 

So for me, I am in the use a pack camp.

 

Rick G

 

post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post





I bought one of those as well when I was at the Highlands about 6 years ago.  I bought if from my instructor who I believe is the guy who invented it.

 

Funny thing though, I never have used it.  Still wrapped up just as I got it.  The reason?  When I am out west skiing a big mountain, I ski with a pack with ski attachments that also houses my hydration.  The pack also gives me the ability to bring or shed an extra layer as temps fluctuate during the day.  I can also easily pack a lunch and snacks to maximize my money and ski time.

 

So for me, I am in the use a pack camp.

 

Rick G

 

A pack is definitely better for long and strenuous hikes, but I like the simple strap for shorter in-bounds hikes, like Highland Bowl or some of the hikes in Alta.  The skis I'm using now are heavy and have so much rocker that the brakes won't hold them together, so they are a real handful to carry on my shoulder.  I'm using the strap to carry on almost any climb I need to take my skis off for.

I use a pack AND the strap at Tuckerman. I ditch my pack when I change my shoes, then I use the strap to carry the rest of the way.  

I'm old and I need every advantage I can get.  The strap is so easy to carry and simple to use that I never leave it home.

 

BK
 

 

post #35 of 41

Reviving an old thread: I just got the small Dakine Heli 11L backpack for exactly this need. It can carry skis and a couple other small things, but is not too bulky. It can also hold a water bladder. I plan to use it at Taos next year.

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

Well, I like the Mountain Goat Ski Tote. We climbed Kachina at Taos which was around an hour of hiking. After an up climb initial section, there was a ridge ski/traverse and then climb again. Initially, I left my jacket and helmet on, then clipped the helmet and zipped my jacket around the skis.

It was clearly more efficient and faster to carry the skis and have poles in both hands and the load centered, than to carry skis over the shoulder. I had done so on shorter hikes. Over time/multiple hikes however, skis on shoulders do start 'sensitizing' and are less comfortable.

I wondered about the brakes/bindings/edges wearing the jacket and digging in a little. So far there wasn't any appearance of wear with the brakes being the primary contact point. I do think, that it is possible that over time something could snag or wear the material and a thin section of material or webbing where the ski and binding sides could contact the back of a jacket or top, would not be a bad idea (like the G-string). Rolling it back up and putting it in a pocket was simple, fast and light. I did not notice in my pocket all day.

Additionally, there are other uses. A friend's tele binding cable broke in the powder after one hike and we (Snowfan and I) had to rig a method to keep the boot in the binding to get him down. After some trial and error we devised a method using the adjust-ability of the Mtn Goat straps to generate enough forward 'cinching' so my friend could get down to the base area.

They also double as ski straps and are easier for kids to carry skis on dicey hikes, etc.

 

I thought the Mountain Goat had definite potential for me when I saw this thread last winter.  Had a chance to put that to the test in Montana this winter.  I'm not the type to do back country or even much side country.  Too old to have the energy to hike and ski.  As a petite woman, carrying skis on my shoulder has never worked that well.  I got the Goat for any longish carry situation.  At Bridger, getting from the parking space and then UP the hill to the lift was a lot easier with the Goat.  At Big Sky, I spent a day changing out demo skis at Lone Mtn Sports.  That requires carrying skis up two flights of metal stairs and then climbing up a relatively steep and packed slope.  Not exactly a long hike.  But much easier with the Goat, especially in the afternoon when I was getting on the tired side but not about to quit.

 

Bottom line: I'm very glad I have it.  Hope to use it for Catherine's at Alta in April.
 

 

post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
 

After a bit a of looking and attempts at getting a couple ski carrier manufacturer's to get the concept of carrying skis and snowboards and make some design tweaks, I think I finally found a good option. Just after hiking to the Telluride Gold Hill chutes, a friend was hiking the Black Iron Bowl ridge and met the manufacturer/owner of Mountain Goat Ski Totes and purchased a couple for his climb and ski. He called me and told me "You have to add this to your store!". So I contacted the owner and obtained some initial supplies and added them to our store.

Note that these also work great for schlepping your skis to and from an outlying parking lot or condo and a lift or for spring hike and skis while corn camping........



Here's how it works:

1. Unroll the tote by releasing the Velcro strap. Lay the tote out on the ground with the Velcro straps open and facing up, creating a square shape with the shoulder straps.
 



2. Lay the skis onto and perpendicular to the Velcro straps with the toe piece of the ski binding just above the Velcro stro strap that is attached to the shorter of the two shoulder straps, and the heel piece of the ski binding just above the other Velcro strap.



3. Squeezing the skis together, tightly wrap the two Velcro straps around and just below the ski binding's toe and heel piece so that when lifted off the ground the Velcro straps support the weight of the skis.



4. Grasp the skis with one hand just above the toe piece of the ski binding. While lifting the skies with one hand; put your other arm through one of the shoulder straps as you would in putting on a backpack



5. Now put your other arm through the remaining shoulder strap and adjust the tightness of the shoulder straps by pulling down on the end loops with your thumbs to tighten and hold the skis securely to your back!



6. When you are finished using the tote, simply roll it up close the Velcro strap and stash it in your pocket!

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

Well, I like the Mountain Goat Ski Tote. We climbed Kachina at Taos which was around an hour of hiking. After an up climb initial section, there was a ridge ski/traverse and then climb again. Initially, I left my jacket and helmet on, then clipped the helmet and zipped my jacket around the skis.

It was clearly more efficient and faster to carry the skis and have poles in both hands and the load centered, than to carry skis over the shoulder. I had done so on shorter hikes. Over time/multiple hikes however, skis on shoulders do start 'sensitizing' and are less comfortable.

I wondered about the brakes/bindings/edges wearing the jacket and digging in a little. So far there wasn't any appearance of wear with the brakes being the primary contact point. I do think, that it is possible that over time something could snag or wear the material and a thin section of material or webbing where the ski and binding sides could contact the back of a jacket or top, would not be a bad idea (like the G-string). Rolling it back up and putting it in a pocket was simple, fast and light. I did not notice in my pocket all day.

Additionally, there are other uses. A friend's tele binding cable broke in the powder after one hike and we (Snowfan and I) had to rig a method to keep the boot in the binding to get him down. After some trial and error we devised a method using the adjust-ability of the Mtn Goat straps to generate enough forward 'cinching' so my friend could get down to the base area.

They also double as ski straps and are easier for kids to carry skis on dicey hikes, etc.

 

I thought the Mountain Goat had definite potential for me when I saw this thread last winter.  Had a chance to put that to the test in Montana this winter.  I'm not the type to do back country or even much side country.  Too old to have the energy to hike and ski.  As a petite woman, carrying skis on my shoulder has never worked that well.  I got the Goat for any longish carry situation.  At Bridger, getting from the parking space and then UP the hill to the lift was a lot easier with the Goat.  At Big Sky, I spent a day changing out demo skis at Lone Mtn Sports.  That requires carrying skis up two flights of metal stairs and then climbing up a relatively steep and packed slope.  Not exactly a long hike.  But much easier with the Goat, especially in the afternoon when I was getting on the tired side but not about to quit.

 

Bottom line: I'm very glad I have it.  Hope to use it for Catherine's at Alta in April.
 

 


An update for my use of the Mountain Goat.  Used it a few times for Catherine's since my post in 2012, including a couple times in the past week.  Works great for the short hike, especially when I'm staying at Alta and have no need for even a small backpack.  As I mentioned before, as a petite woman carrying skis on my shoulder never works for me.

post #38 of 41

I've been looking for something like this. Found a site that reviewed two similar products, one being this Mountain Goat one; the other called Bowtie. http://desertsnowjunkies.com/review-pocket-ski-carriers-for-hike-to-skiing/

 

For those who poo-poo the idea of straps: I'm glad your shoulders and wrists don't suck. Mine do. Carrying my skis on my shoulder is a constant process of shifting weight, switching shoulders, etc. It's no good for hikes where I need to be balanced.

post #39 of 41

This one looks like it may be the easiest to put on by yourself: http://www.function-snow.com/product/02-ultralight-ski-carry-system/

 

I've used a simple strap that you twist around the skis, and I can't get that thing on my body by myself. Forget about removing it.

post #40 of 41

At Aspen Highlands the ski patrol sells a strap similar to what you're proposing. It's basically a long loop of webbing. Here's a series of pictures showing how to use it: http://www.skinet.com/skiing/photo-gallery/how-carry-your-skis-bootpack 

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by spchin24 View Post

At Aspen Highlands the ski patrol sells a strap similar to what you're proposing. It's basically a long loop of webbing. Here's a series of pictures showing how to use it: http://www.skinet.com/skiing/photo-gallery/how-carry-your-skis-bootpack 

Good for the demo dude. I ordered the Function thing.
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