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SL Turns MA Request

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
 I just came back from a great week in New Mexico, where the mountains are far better than I realized. We had great snow and I spent most of my time off-piste, but I grabbed some carving video on the last day when the powder was cut up and sun-crusted. I didn't get any off-piste video because no one in my group was skilled enough to follow me down the off-piste stuff I skied (consequences of skiing with my Texas friends)

The skier: 6'3 225lb 21 years old, ex-racer
Equipment: Nordica Dobermann Aggressor 130 boots, old Nordica Dobermann SLR 165s with marker plate + binders
Location/Conditions : Taos and Angelfire, fresh groomed snow, pretty soft 

I've been living in Texas for the past few years and don't get to ski as much as I used to or would like. My goal was powerful slalom-type turns in the freeski video, and obviously I'm trying to go fast in the gates.

My boots are new for this season, and I think I like the aggressor stance. I was coming from Dobermann WC 150s, and the Aggressors make bumps and offpiste skiing far more tolerable with the 130 flex. The trade-off is that I occasionally "bottom out" the flex in high-powered carved turns, but it's worth it IMO. 

Any opinions are appreciated. 

Thanks,
Greg

(Click on these to view, or right-click and save to your machine so you can view full-screen)
Freeski Video

Gates Video (NASTAR)
 


Edited by doublediamond223 - 3/14/10 at 7:16pm
post #2 of 13
Since you mention new boots, have you had the alignment on your left boot checked out on snow? 

Notice how you have some counter and hip angulation on your left turns and your stance is narrower.  On the right turns where most of your weight is supported by that left boot you have a bit of rotation, and a wider stance to compensate for the lack of hip angulation.  With your background, this difference is much more likely to be due to equipment than to your basic technique. 

If you're comfortable playing with alignment shims to tweak your alignment to be less bow-legged, try using different sizes thick side facing out (raising little toe/lateral side relative to big toe/medial side.)  If you get that left boot dialed in, then check out the other one too.

I recall vaguely that you know Heluvaskier.  If so, send him a PM asking his advice.  His skiing knowledge has become quite impressive.
post #3 of 13
Thanks sharpedges,
Greg and I have discussed his alignment a little bit (as well as those pants!). He is definitely showing a lot of improvement over what his alignment used to be, but as you say there are still some adjustments to sort out. Without being there, I'm a little indecisive about whether he is too far out or too far in on the left leg because the leg looks a little soft to me, even though his upper body is exhibiting tendencies of being too far out... I'd have to see him in his boots stationary and skiing to be certain. I suggested that he make a cant wallet and experiment with different thicknesses of duct tape under his boots. It would be most beneficial to see the results on video if he were doing this on his own...

Aside from the alignment, I think he should have a heavy focus on the lower body [feet/ankles/legs] - tipping the skis onto edge and flexing and extending his legs. Currently, there is very little of either going on and tapping into that new range of motion will undoubtedly improve his skiing. Once that is developed it will be time to throw in fore/aft balance and focus on the upper body, but that focus is more or less worthless without first fixing what is happening with the lower body.

Later,

Greg
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

...I think he should have a heavy focus on the lower body [feet/ankles/legs] - tipping the skis onto edge and flexing and extending his legs. Currently, there is very little of either going on and tapping into that new range of motion will undoubtedly improve his skiing.

I agree.
post #5 of 13
What he said.  You're definitely steering/pivoting the top part of the turn more than you need to in both videos.  At the completion of one turn, roll to neutral, roll over to the new edge (steering or pivoting as little as possible, if at all) and pressure before the fall line (upside down traverse), so that you start carving early and get more of the turn done in the first third, where you don't have to resist the forces (most of your forces come in the bottom third, and you're fighting gravity and momentum).

Same thing in the GS video.  Your turn is late and all the forces are after the gate.  Get the forces going and get more of the turn done on the upside of the gate...



Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Thanks sharpedges,
Greg and I have discussed his alignment a little bit (as well as those pants!). He is definitely showing a lot of improvement over what his alignment used to be, but as you say there are still some adjustments to sort out. Without being there, I'm a little indecisive about whether he is too far out or too far in on the left leg because the leg looks a little soft to me, even though his upper body is exhibiting tendencies of being too far out... I'd have to see him in his boots stationary and skiing to be certain. I suggested that he make a cant wallet and experiment with different thicknesses of duct tape under his boots. It would be most beneficial to see the results on video if he were doing this on his own...

Aside from the alignment, I think he should have a heavy focus on the lower body [feet/ankles/legs] - tipping the skis onto edge and flexing and extending his legs. Currently, there is very little of either going on and tapping into that new range of motion will undoubtedly improve his skiing. Once that is developed it will be time to throw in fore/aft balance and focus on the upper body, but that focus is more or less worthless without first fixing what is happening with the lower body.

Later,

Greg
 
post #6 of 13
After seeing a few still pics, the left leg is aligned pretty soft or is tracking inside for some reason... 
 
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

After seeing a few still pics, the left leg is aligned pretty soft or is tracking inside for some reason... 


12402_734007970073_9221127_40487651_7644558_n.jpg

This picture in particular.
post #8 of 13
By the way, Kathleen says... "nice pants". I guess it does work after all...
post #9 of 13
Warning to the casual observer - this analysis is going to look extremely picky and overly technical...

DD,

Nice turns! I measured the angulation on your left turns in the 132-142 degree range. Those are pretty intense. Your right turns were a little more banked. The camera angle may be a little deceiving and/or the slope may have a bit of a double fall line contributing to some of the difference, but not all. No wonder you bottom out those boots. I see you over flexing in the ankles, knees and at the hips. I'd nominate you as the poster child example for those who argue that encouragement to get forward is bad. You can see where you are most forward coming out of the right turns where your tip lead is greatest (e.g. 14 seconds). Most of the time you are mostly centered, but your move to angulate in the middle of your turns is driving you forward. I'd like to see that relatively forward movement happening earlier in the turn. The biggest thing I see is that in your right turn transition I see a slight heel pivot (13 seconds, frame 658 -659, right as you get the skis flat) to engage the edges. I think I'm seeing almost the same move in your left turns, but it is masked/quieted by the inside leg catching up from excessive tip lead (and the camera angle makes it hard too). Finally, I see your move to the inside of the new turns being a little too lateral. I'd like to see more new inside leg flexing right at the point where that heel pivot is occurring.

I agree with Sharp that the left boot is the first place you should start. My fear is that all of the observations above are driven off that boot alignment. But if I had to work with you as is I'd work on a taller stance first and then on turn transitions. I think you can achieve more new inside leg flexing in the transition and move the forward movement earlier into the turn from a taller stance. If you could make these changes you'd move from really good skiing to flat out scary good skiing.
post #10 of 13
Great skiing

I would work on more retraction at the end of the turn phase. Right now you seem to float through the transition with pretty straight legs, which limits your extension into the next turn. Most of the turning is done after the fall line.
post #11 of 13
I am not at all qualified to say, but to me it looks like you are not pressuring the outside ski enough.  Almost looks like the phantom turn.  Stay neutral - but with some pressure on the shin when you drop down coming around.

If you are going to angulate then you need lots of pressure on the outside ski, at least at some point.  Other wise, you can't stay in the turn with the ski engaged.  It's like "ten toes" or "C" turns.  You are rushing it.
Edited by Paul Jones - 3/17/10 at 6:59am
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post


If you are going to angulate then you need lots of pressure on the outside ski, at least at some point.  Other wise, you can't stay in the turn with the ski engaged.  It's like "ten toes" or "C" turns.  You are rushing it.
Hm, I tend too look at it the other way around. In order to keep pressure on the outside ski with a given amount of edging and speed you need to angulate. Without angulation the pressure will be more evenly distributed between the skis.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post



Hm, I tend too look at it the other way around. In order to keep pressure on the outside ski with a given amount of edging and speed you need to angulate. Without angulation the pressure will be more evenly distributed between the skis.

 

I agreee with what you are saying.  Seems the same as what I was saying.  Presure the ski and angulate.  Angulation is lacking from what I see.
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