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Carrying your DSLR on the slopes- How do you do it? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiergirl777 View Post

So I am going to throw a wrench right into this.....what about a DSLR camera bag that has dual functions.  I need to be able to carry the pack on a plane with the camera AND a laptop in it.  But I want to take the camera (Canon and 80-200 lens) with me while skiing but don't want a huge pack on my back when skiing....I'll feel like the Hunchback of Notre Dame!     Any ideas?


A Tranpack Sidekick Pro will allow this along with your boots too. Remember the more things you ask a product to do, the less things it does well. 

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post


Remember the more things you ask a product to do, the less things it does well. 



Very true! 

post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

Is anyone using Micro 4:3 instead of DSLR and instead of point-n-shoot on the slopes?

 


 

No one, apparently.     Hunh.    

 

NOT what I expected.

post #34 of 40

  Anyone have experience with one of the micro four thirds DSLR cameras out there with decent interchangable lenses?  The LUMIX G, SONY NEX-5, and Olympus come to mind.  They have to be a whole lot easier to carry, but I want to know more about the dynamic range of the exposures (kinda important in the snow) and what a few people who use them think before pulling the trigger.  

post #35 of 40

When snowboarding, I carry my DSLR in a Tamrac 5514:

http://www.tamrac.com/5514.htm

Tamrac 5514

 

I carry a single prime lens on it (85mm f/1.8).  

 

I would avoid carrying it naked or using an open holster.... the camera will accumulate enough snow even with a bag (unless you NEVER fall down).

 

I use a small, waterproof, shock-proof point and shoot for anything that absolutely needs a wider field of view.

 

I also don't carry the DSLR on all the days I ride.  Usually just one or two days out of 4 or 5.

post #36 of 40
  • That case Logic xnslr looked the best its not bulky and looks like the insert is great for when you might fall etc, but its no loger available boo!!. 

I dont get the thinktank expandable one, if you extend it to be able fit a 300mm lens then it has lost all its strength as the extender is just plain soft material, thus rendering your bag useless for protection is it just me or what? It seem like crap 

post #37 of 40

I pretty regularly carry ~$7K of DSLR and lenses, while skiing (resort and touring), in a non-photo backpack with no special padding.

 

Oh, and I fall, sometimes in full cartwheel mode. Haven't broken a camera or lens yet! 

 

I do usually have a few layers in the bag, like a fleece, for padding. And my shovel, probe, and camelbak are jammed in there too-- which can actually all be protective if placed right/destructive if placed wrong. 

 

The most important thing for me is having straps that will keep the bag snug against my body when I go off little kickers, and more straps that keep the contents of the bag snug too. 

 

Most recently I was using an older BSA Stash on the mountain. 

post #38 of 40

I use a 5D2 and various lenses for work. 

 

I also sometimes bring a Fuji X-E1 and various lenses (or bring it instead of the DSLR if I know the shots I need don't require the DSLR and lenses). It's much easier to carry, but it's much less well built and much more likely to break than my 5D2 + 35L. 

post #39 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

I pretty regularly carry ~$7K of DSLR and lenses, while skiing (resort and touring), in a non-photo backpack with no special padding.

 

Oh, and I fall, sometimes in full cartwheel mode. Haven't broken a camera or lens yet! 

 

I do usually have a few layers in the bag, like a fleece, for padding. And my shovel, probe, and camelbak are jammed in there too-- which can actually all be protective if placed right/destructive if placed wrong. 

 

The most important thing for me is having straps that will keep the bag snug against my body when I go off little kickers, and more straps that keep the contents of the bag snug too. 

 

Most recently I was using an older BSA Stash on the mountain. 

Does anyone get pictures of that!?eek.gif

post #40 of 40

Nope, but I've got some first-person video of a couple somewhere.

 

(BTW, BCA Stash, not BSA, obviously). 

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