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New instructor looking for a new pair of sticks to match!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hey guys and gals, I've been digging through this site for awhile looking at various ski reviews and decided that I may as well ask for some personal opinions from the experts themselves! :)

First, about me:
I'm 18, 5' 8", ~ 130 lbs, I guess I'd call myself a level 6-7 skiier (comfortable on any of our blacks and most double blacks, just working on the bumps and powder right now >.<) and teach at Silver Mt Resort in the NW.

I've been skiing for about 4 years and 2 seasons ago I got my Rossi Axiums (169cm, 69 waist) and have been skiing them ever since!
I really have been pushing myself this year, drilling with the other instructors and trying new things and all that fun stuff. And I think that my lil Axiums that've brought me all the way from the bunny hill to the glades have served their course under my feet.
I feel like I am outskiing them now, they chatter at what I now consider high speeds and that actually never occurred to me until I rode a new friend of mine's Head Monsters that are a couple years old. The change in the stability and overall crud-busting really made me realize that it's time for an upgrade.

So, now onto my current situation:
I'm really into the concept of a one-ski quiver type of thing. I understand that you make sacrifices in doing so but I just want something to accomplish all of my needs OK-ish so I don't end up spending as much on 2-3 pairs of skis.
I just started into the freestyle game (I can do a few grabs and show off my ski and 180, working on 360. Can do a box sideways about 50% of the time barely not making a fool of myself haha), I've always been an exceptionally good carver (so the race team says anyway) and I'm a little inexperienced in the pow but I've always been able to manage well enough to go into the deep stuff south of the border. 

My "plan" if you will, is to find something to where I can still enjoy my edges on the steeps and deeps of the groomers, have enough float to where I can ski pow a little better hopefully, and still have a little.. "liveliness" as people call it.. for the park and for some hippity-hops on the sides of runs and preferably twin-tips as I've already dug my tails into the jump trying to do a switch 180 2 times now >.<.
The final component in my grand little scheme, is something I just recently saw in a local shop while looking at demo options, they're a kind of binding (can't remember the name, forgive me) where the entire mount moves as one unit with a simple key-screw looking tool that just turns on the front of the binding and slides the mount forward and back and has a built in ruler so you can see (in cm) how far forward or back you want to adjust your bindings. VERY COOL!
To me that says "Ahah! Swift versatility at a moment's notice!" for a nice carving tool at the recommended mounting position, a little more centered for the rails and switch landings, and a little back for some sweet fluffy pow runs!!

So, I would love opinions on skis that maybe I should look into demoing that would fulfill my dreams and desires haha, so to speak. :)
Also, any additional tips or advice I should take into account would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks to you all ahead of time! Sorry for the length!! ^^'
EPICSKI FOREVER
-Kogu
post #2 of 13
that adjustable binding will help (K2 SchizoFrantic?)

hard to find one ski to race gates, spin in the park, and powder but doable in all.

my advice is 80ish under foot, 20ish M turn radius, twintip

http://k2skis.com/skis/factory/extreme  ?

cheap too, and comes with that binding
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hey mntlion,
first just getting it out is for some reason that link isnt working (could be their end haha),
anyway, I was just thinking as i was reading some reviews on the Head Monster im 78, Volkl Bridge, and k2 PE...
how much does "flex" matter in a ski? I was not sure really what to think about this in terms of the effect on the ski?
thanks for the prompt reply btw!
-kogu
EDIT: hey i took a look at those k2 extremes and those look sick! and not just the design lol. they seem to pretty well fit what i want and everyone i've read reviews by say its like an upgraded pe which was a ski recommended to me by a local shop :) thanks for the advice!
Edited by Kogu - 3/11/10 at 12:33am
post #4 of 13
flex:   the bigger you are, the more aggressive you ski, more hardpack you ski, the stiffer a ski you need,

most twins are a bit softer overall

the extreme is the new version of the PE.  
post #5 of 13
Geez, ski schools hire someone who has only skiing for 4 years?  Someone is paying $120 for a 2 hour lesson from someone who can't really ski powder or bumps?  What kind of single black runs do you have at your mountain that dont have bumps???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kogu View Post

Hey guys and gals, I've been digging through this site for awhile looking at various ski reviews and decided that I may as well ask for some personal opinions from the experts themselves! :)

First, about me:
I'm 18, 5' 8", ~ 130 lbs, I guess I'd call myself a level 6-7 skiier (comfortable on any of our blacks and most double blacks, just working on the bumps and powder right now >.<) and teach at Silver Mt Resort in the NW.

I've been skiing for about 4 years and 2 seasons ago I got my Rossi Axiums (169cm, 69 waist) and have been skiing them ever since!
I really have been pushing myself this year, drilling with the other instructors and trying new things and all that fun stuff. And I think that my lil Axiums that've brought me all the way from the bunny hill to the glades have served their course under my feet.
I feel like I am outskiing them now, they chatter at what I now consider high speeds and that actually never occurred to me until I rode a new friend of mine's Head Monsters that are a couple years old. The change in the stability and overall crud-busting really made me realize that it's time for an upgrade.

So, now onto my current situation:
I'm really into the concept of a one-ski quiver type of thing. I understand that you make sacrifices in doing so but I just want something to accomplish all of my needs OK-ish so I don't end up spending as much on 2-3 pairs of skis.
I just started into the freestyle game (I can do a few grabs and show off my ski and 180, working on 360. Can do a box sideways about 50% of the time barely not making a fool of myself haha), I've always been an exceptionally good carver (so the race team says anyway) and I'm a little inexperienced in the pow but I've always been able to manage well enough to go into the deep stuff south of the border. 

My "plan" if you will, is to find something to where I can still enjoy my edges on the steeps and deeps of the groomers, have enough float to where I can ski pow a little better hopefully, and still have a little.. "liveliness" as people call it.. for the park and for some hippity-hops on the sides of runs and preferably twin-tips as I've already dug my tails into the jump trying to do a switch 180 2 times now >.<.
The final component in my grand little scheme, is something I just recently saw in a local shop while looking at demo options, they're a kind of binding (can't remember the name, forgive me) where the entire mount moves as one unit with a simple key-screw looking tool that just turns on the front of the binding and slides the mount forward and back and has a built in ruler so you can see (in cm) how far forward or back you want to adjust your bindings. VERY COOL!
To me that says "Ahah! Swift versatility at a moment's notice!" for a nice carving tool at the recommended mounting position, a little more centered for the rails and switch landings, and a little back for some sweet fluffy pow runs!!

So, I would love opinions on skis that maybe I should look into demoing that would fulfill my dreams and desires haha, so to speak. :)
Also, any additional tips or advice I should take into account would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks to you all ahead of time! Sorry for the length!! ^^'
EPICSKI FOREVER
-Kogu
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks mntlion, that was a lot of what I'd assumed just wanted clarity.

And... I'd known I would get at least one negative post and that I wouldn't answer but I figure that at least he asked a question that deserves an answer..
A black on my mountain that doesn't have bumps is Steep & Deep, fastest run on our mountain, groomed all the way down and race team practices there. Heaven gets mild bumps but would not consider them formidable, more powder than anything usually, Rendevous also is usually a steeper black which gets moguls on the ungroomed side (easy, easy for a black but a black nevertheless).
And I'm not sure if you know much about how ski instructing works but at my level (can't really call it anything other than level 0?) Means I'm qualified to teach NE's (never-evers) through level 2 and occasionally 3. Beginners to advaced beginners, I'm just showing them the ropes and giving them drills to work on that will make them better skiers. Also I work a lot with our Silver Kid's program which is kids who are just learning how to ski and spend all day up on the mountain.
Just wanted to clear it up and I won't spend much time defending my ability because that's a slippery slope to start on (haha, that's funny and I didn't even notice at first).
Thanks for the positive feedback though! :)

post #7 of 13
 It's funny, I just asked this exact same question and I also know the area, I have been to Schweitzer.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

Haha you mean youre looking for a pair of skis similar to those im looking for?
And yeah, generally Schweitzer gets a bit more publicity and is more highly thought of in terms of ski resorts. I actually chose to ski at Silver though much for that reason. It seems like the several times ive been there its always very crowded. Not to say its not a great resort because ive had some of my best/most progressive days of skiing there, i just prefer a smaller resort :p. also i like the gondola lol. How frequently have you skied (spelling?) up here in north idaho?

post #9 of 13
 I just skied there for the first time last year (went 3 times), no lines for me since I went when they were getting about 8 inches per day. And yeah I am looking for pretty much the same thing as you, just with a narrower waist (I'm on the East Coast).
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kogu View Post

A black on my mountain that doesn't have bumps is Steep & Deep, fastest run on our mountain, groomed all the way down and race team practices there. Heaven gets mild bumps but would not consider them formidable, more powder than anything usually, Rendevous also is usually a steeper black which gets moguls on the ungroomed side (easy, easy for a black but a black nevertheless).
And I'm not sure if you know much about how ski instructing works but at my level (can't really call it anything other than level 0?) Means I'm qualified to teach NE's (never-evers) through level 2 and occasionally 3. Beginners to advaced beginners, I'm just showing them the ropes and giving them drills to work on that will make them better skiers. Also I work a lot with our Silver Kid's program which is kids who are just learning how to ski and spend all day up on the mountain.
 


So people are paying $60 an hour for a glorified babysitter?

Like I said above, I learned to ski at Badger Pass  By the third day everyone in my family was skiing "expert" <wink wink> runs at Badger Pass.  While we were skiing "expert runs", they WEREN'T advanced/expert.

Generally speaking, if a run is groomed it is not a true black.  Of course there are exceptions.  At Mammoth Mountain they installed a cable on Cornice bowl that that a groomer is attached to (it would be too steep for a person in a groomer to go up).

And generally high school kids dont race on true black runs.  Notice I say high school.  If you are pro/am, sure, you race on true black runs.  The GS at the olympics at Squaw Valley started at the easy part of Palisades, and that is at least a advanced run.

If a run is a true black it wont be groomed and in most cases should be too steep to be able to groom (but see cornice bowl), and a double diamond?  Forget about it!

But of course some resports will label a run a diamon even tho at say snowbird it might only be a green!
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Well, i suppose if you'd like to look at it that way then go ahead. Though teachers and professors do much of the same thing in that respect, but thats your call! :)
However, this "glorified babysitter" just passed a national exam to check that my standards of teaching are up to par with what is expected nationwide throughout all the ski resorts, thus certifying me as a level 1 instructor. If you have any problems with their system, please contact the PSIA at their website :).
As far as what makes a run a "true black", again, is apparently within your jurisdiction to name haha. I base what i call a black on what the resorts here in the northwest designate as a black or double black diamond. However, if you'd like to change that as well, be my guest though I'm not sure where exactly to start with that process haha! Perhaps contact your local ski resorts and see if they will maybe upgrade their ratings system to your standards? idk.
Oh, by the way, do you have any suggestions for skis I could use? Thanks!
-Kogu
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kogu View Post

Well, i suppose if you'd like to look at it that way then go ahead. Though teachers and professors do much of the same thing in that respect, but thats your call! :)
However, this "glorified babysitter" just passed a national exam to check that my standards of teaching are up to par with what is expected nationwide throughout all the ski resorts, thus certifying me as a level 1 instructor. If you have any problems with their system, please contact the PSIA at their website :).
As far as what makes a run a "true black", again, is apparently within your jurisdiction to name haha. I base what i call a black on what the resorts here in the northwest designate as a black or double black diamond. However, if you'd like to change that as well, be my guest though I'm not sure where exactly to start with that process haha! Perhaps contact your local ski resorts and see if they will maybe upgrade their ratings system to your standards? idk.
Oh, by the way, do you have any suggestions for skis I could use? Thanks!
-Kogu
 

Congratulations of getting your psia level 1!  If you don't mind, what questions were on your written test?  What did they ask you to do for your skiing test?`
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Not as much as I was afraid of actually haha. I over-estimated the test based on the fact that the study guide is 130 pages long, y'know lol.
The questions were mainly just theoretical questions over beginner skiing technique. Such as what is a wedge christie or what edges are engaged in a classic wedge? Which of the 4 principles would be used most to initiate a wedge turn? And then of course there's some tricky ones like... Oh, it asked about a theory of teaching from the book, Pioget's? (spelling) and then they asked about the Q-angle for women and how that affects their stance.
So yeah, haha. It wasn't too bad really. The memorization on the PSIA registration test was harder for me because I forgot about it, namely the responsibility code >.<. Forgot about it til the morning of so I just crammed it and then it wasn't too hard to remember for the test.
The skiing portion of the test was pretty... amusing :p. I'm a little dissapointed in the ease. I have a fried who took his snowboard level 1 at Lookout on the same day that I took my ski lesson at Silver and when we cliniced over both level 1 tests the snowboard ones were somewhat strenuous, not that I'm a proficient enough snowboarder to know personally how hard they would be, but he said they were just so abnormal and unique in the way you had to do them they were hard. And he's just as practiced a snowboarder as I am skier lol.
Yeah I guess I kinda rambled there, didn't I? Oops.
So are you an instructor also?
EDIT- Sorry about that, you asked WHAT they asked for the level 1 skiing portion!
They were very easy. 1. Wedge/parallel changeup, 2. wedge turns, 3. skate stops with a pole plant, 4. wedge christies, 5. open parallel turns, 6. skating over flat terrain, 7. ummmm.. I think that was all.
Like I said, very easy. Like, TOO easy, if you ask me... my test administrator decided to take me out for some work on the level 2 skiing qualifications just because I was itchy to know and he demonstrated all of them also. Those were somewhat difficult. I guess I'll list those too since in all honesty I'm just waiting for my teapot so I can do my essay. Anyway,
1. Slipping along the fall line (skate slip), instead of skating to a stop just roll ankles downhill to disengage matching edges and slide down the hill. Learned how to do that as a newbie as a fall-back :P.
2. Turning with one ski raised... yeah, straight forward.
3. Short-swing turns, just an aggressive short radius turn basically. Also you need to be able to set an edge with a pole plant (like a skate stop) before initiating next turn with smooth rhythm. More fun then difficult :p. 
4. Bump skiing, just controlled and slow on an easier bump run.
5. Jump-entry turn, means that you basically just spring up faster than a normal extension in a fluid, medium speed turn, skis leaving the snow, then landing on the opposite edge. Rinse, wash, repeat. :)
That's all I can remember lol. And now my tea is done and I'm going to go and finish my Hamlet essay! (hooray -.-')

-Kogu
Edited by Kogu - 3/18/10 at 11:43pm
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