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Level II Last Weekend - FAIL - Page 3

post #61 of 70
Oh ok, I apologize then.  I thought you were pulling a chaos, but I was wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post




Visualization and Intention are powerful tools.  They didn't work however in my case.
post #62 of 70
 lol, no nothing like chaos here - just trying to psych myself up - plus my trainers told me I would pass, as did the examiner in the practice exam.
post #63 of 70
completely agree, "equal weighting" leads to the uphill ski leading you. <rant> One of the main reasons I never pursued getting any cert for instruction is because I can't stand most of the back-assword crap that "professional instructors" teach. I was watching a ski program on universal sports the other day, the instructor they had giving tips was suggesting people do a drill where the person lifts the downhill ski for the entire turn. That sort of skiing would get me killed or injured fairly quickly. IMO the first 3 years of race coaching is spent unlearning what people are taught in ski school, and learning how to ski completely in control up to the edge of control. </rant>

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

qual weighting and passive weight transfer is bullshit there is nothing modern about it just doesnt work as well as the other way in anyway shape or form...  Biomechanically it doesnt make sense at all to be balanced on your inside ski at any point in the turn unless you outside ski get taken for a ride. but balance equal between both skis anywhere in the turn is something youll do if you dont want to ski well.

 
post #64 of 70
I consider myself an advanced skier (71/2/8 of 10), but a novice when it comes this sort of "technical" jargon regarding some of these terms.  Never had a lesson, although I've been thinking hard about it lately.  I believe I have an issue something similar to Greg's- on right turns my inside ski doesn't engage nearly as well as my left turns without having to "think about doing it."  Whereas my left turns are completely fluid, stable center, and get that "drive" through the fall-line motion.  To me, it seems like I'm better centered and more comfortable on my left turns than my right.  Can anyone help me with this minor but annoying problem?  Thanks in advance!
post #65 of 70
probably a strength/confidence thing. You are probably right footed, and on a right hand turn your left foot is the dominant(downhill) foot. Try concentrating on those turns when you do them making sure you are trusting your weight on that (left ) foot. You should be able to build some muscle memory, make sure you muscles in the left leg are ass strong as the muscles in you right leg. Another thing to look at is the IT band, my Fiance is currently in PT for having a short IT band and Quad, make sure you stretch those out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rippingit View Post

I consider myself an advanced skier (71/2/8 of 10), but a novice when it comes this sort of "technical" jargon regarding some of these terms.  Never had a lesson, although I've been thinking hard about it lately.  I believe I have an issue something similar to Greg's- on right turns my inside ski doesn't engage nearly as well as my left turns without having to "think about doing it."  Whereas my left turns are completely fluid, stable center, and get that "drive" through the fall-line motion.  To me, it seems like I'm better centered and more comfortable on my left turns than my right.  Can anyone help me with this minor but annoying problem?  Thanks in advance!
post #66 of 70
 wait. they are getting mad at you for transferring your weight to your downhill ski too early?
post #67 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaStraightLine View Post

completely agree, "equal weighting" leads to the uphill ski leading you. <rant> One of the main reasons I never pursued getting any cert for instruction is because I can't stand most of the back-assword crap that "professional instructors" teach. I was watching a ski program on universal sports the other day, the instructor they had giving tips was suggesting people do a drill where the person lifts the downhill ski for the entire turn. That sort of skiing would get me killed or injured fairly quickly. IMO the first 3 years of race coaching is spent unlearning what people are taught in ski school, and learning how to ski completely in control up to the edge of control. </rant>

 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

qual weighting and passive weight transfer is bullshit there is nothing modern about it just doesnt work as well as the other way in anyway shape or form...  Biomechanically it doesnt make sense at all to be balanced on your inside ski at any point in the turn unless you outside ski get taken for a ride. but balance equal between both skis anywhere in the turn is something youll do if you dont want to ski well.

 

I went through a phase where I believed what youz are saying but I am no longer quite so cocky.  Balancing exclusively on the outside ski and guiding with the inside ski leaves one tensionally unbalanced between the inside half of the body in relation to the turn and the outside half of the body.  This imbalance tends to shut down fine motor control in the core and a sense of coordination between the feet.   Carrying enough weight on the inside ski to balance out the tension greatly improves dynamic balance, fluidity and flow of the entire body.

Is the pressure/weight equal between the legs?  Well no but it kinda feels that way when the tension is balanced.  Is this the way to ski all the time?  Well, no, the dynamics of the turn and intentions may dictate otherwise in any individual turn.

Am I gonna keep skiing with equal tension instead of total outside foot dominance?  You bet your sweet bippee I am cuz the power and control are so much sweeter.

post #68 of 70
I'm not saying to have all you weight on the downhill ski I am saying teaching equal weight leads to problems. I think we can all agree that having more weight on the uphill ski is a bad thing, If you have a balanced stance you can't not have weight on the uphill ski. 60/40 Outside/Inside is about as close as I get to even pressure while turning(flat ground non aggressive turn). I am usually about 70/30 with parallel or slightly more angel on the up hill ski. Ive played around with my stance the last could seasons since we have had a lot of hard snow and have found what is most stable for me. Ive also almost lost it due to an uphill ski catching an edge going 50+ and do not like the feeling of an uphill ski having an equal amount of  pressure, I was sore pretty sore after reeling that one back in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post



 

I went through a phase where I believed what youz are saying but I am no longer quite so cocky.  Balancing exclusively on the outside ski and guiding with the inside ski leaves one tensionally unbalanced between the inside half of the body in relation to the turn and the outside half of the body.  This imbalance tends to shut down fine motor control in the core and a sense of coordination between the feet.   Carrying enough weight on the inside ski to balance out the tension greatly improves dynamic balance, fluidity and flow of the entire body.

Is the pressure/weight equal between the legs?  Well no but it kinda feels that way when the tension is balanced.  Is this the way to ski all the time?  Well, no, the dynamics of the turn and intentions may dictate otherwise in any individual turn.

Am I gonna keep skiing with equal tension instead of total outside foot dominance?  You bet your sweet bippee I am cuz the power and control are so much sweeter.

post #69 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post




Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

qual weighting and passive weight transfer is bullshit there is nothing modern about it just doesnt work as well as the other way in anyway shape or form...  Biomechanically it doesnt make sense at all to be balanced on your inside ski at any point in the turn unless you outside ski get taken for a ride. but balance equal between both skis anywhere in the turn is something youll do if you dont want to ski well.

 

I went through a phase where I believed what youz are saying but I am no longer quite so cocky.  Balancing exclusively on the outside ski and guiding with the inside ski leaves one tensionally unbalanced between the inside half of the body in relation to the turn and the outside half of the body.  This imbalance tends to shut down fine motor control in the core and a sense of coordination between the feet.   Carrying enough weight on the inside ski to balance out the tension greatly improves dynamic balance, fluidity and flow of the entire body.

Is the pressure/weight equal between the legs?  Well no but it kinda feels that way when the tension is balanced.  Is this the way to ski all the time?  Well, no, the dynamics of the turn and intentions may dictate otherwise in any individual turn.

Am I gonna keep skiing with equal tension instead of total outside foot dominance?  You bet your sweet bippee I am cuz the power and control are so much sweeter.


ok well still if you put both feet on the ground some of your balance is going to go to the inside. 

what funnny and ironic is several PSIA examiners have commented on how 2 footed I ski which is awesome and Ill explain why. Teaching active weight transfer is still a valid option and put in to practice with both feet on the ground the inside skis is going to get enough balance and pressure to work.
post #70 of 70
I think you probably hit the nail on the head.  I really don't have the issue on steeper terrain cause the ski (initiating the edge) is easier to drive through the turn than on flatter runs.  I workout my legs quite a bit, so strength may not be an issue, but my right-leg dominance and confidence may be the problems.  That's a great point on the IT band- my left side, including my hip and side of my quad seem to be stiffer than my right side, and have received chiro treatment for my lower back on that side.  I'm going to work on more stretching (roller on my hip/quad) and isolation one-leg exercises.  Thanks again for your help! 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaStraightLine View Post

probably a strength/confidence thing. You are probably right footed, and on a right hand turn your left foot is the dominant(downhill) foot. Try concentrating on those turns when you do them making sure you are trusting your weight on that (left ) foot. You should be able to build some muscle memory, make sure you muscles in the left leg are ass strong as the muscles in you right leg. Another thing to look at is the IT band, my Fiance is currently in PT for having a short IT band and Quad, make sure you stretch those out.

 



 
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