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Old Racer is Back on Slopes - what skiis should I buy - modern racing skiis?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hello All.... this is my first post:
I am back on the slopes after a 10 year hiatis... I went into cross country skiing with no regrets.  I am back to downhill and am teaching my two young children to ski  and am loving this sport once again. 

I am still skiing on my old Rossignol 190cm racing skiis and planning on buying modern racing skiis.  I was stunned to see that Rossignol is no longer making competitive racing skiis...WTF?  I love moguls, high-speed cruizing, jumping, and coaching kids down black diamonds. 
Are modern racing skiis still a good choice for agressive skiers like they were 20 years ago?  Are they a handfull? 
post #2 of 9
Welcome to Epic!

Huh? I think Ted Ligety would disagree with your take on competitive racing skis by Rossi.

While I have just finished 8 years of racing on the new stuff and love the race skis (Fischer RC4s: SL, GS, SG and DH), I wouldn't suggest using them for free skiing often. A high end recreational ski will give you plenty of performance yet be a better rounded ski for all the things you mention you like doing on skis. I'm not up on what is out there so others will be sure to chime in with there preferences.

I do like my 181 cm Rossi B2s a lot and for anything but powder, they rock. FWIW, my B2s are 18.5m with dimensions of 113/76/103.
Edited by MastersRacer - 3/6/10 at 4:44pm
post #3 of 9
stockli stormrider XL or comparable current model.
every manufacturer has a ski like this with respect to sidecut and flex. they all rock.
avoid current race skis if you want to be able to relax a little.

and what MR said: Rossignol is still a great race ski.
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowyOwl View Post

Are modern racing skiis still a good choice for agressive skiers like they were 20 years ago?  Are they a handfull? 


Welcome to the new world. It is very different to the old world you are coming from.

Before you even start thinking about what skis to use have a look at some of the current ski movies to get an idea where the sport has progressed in the last 10 years to get an idea of what is possible now. This is probably as good a place as any to start => www.youtube.com/watch

Racers are no longer top of the pile, the freeskiers have well and truly revolutionized the sport and the benefit is skis which are far more versatile and fun than ever before. And you don't even have to do the spinny flippy jumps if you don't want to!
post #5 of 9
Rossi makes a great race ski and a great binding as well - however, I would not recommend buying a true race ski (ie race stock) to almost any skier unless they are still actively racing.

After having raced for the past 9 seasons (high school through USCSA in college), this is my first year in a long time just free skiing.  I have both a pair of the Rossi race stock GS and SLs.  While these are fun skis on hardpack, their versatility is extremely limited, particularly the GS skis.  On a crowded day you are going to be spending more time scrubbing off speed than you will be making turns - they're really only fun when the slopes are empty and you can let them rip.  While the slaloms are a blast and their quickness makes them much more manageable, the stiff tails still make these skis a serious workout over a full day of skiing and fairly unforgiving.  On either ski you have to be a very active pilot - no getting lazy.  Even as a very strong skier, as far as having an everyday ski goes, I want something that is more forgiving - and has more versatility for bumps, trees, loose snow, etc.  So I'm planning to pick up something that's all mountain oriented in the next few weeks as this year has told me that the racers are just not an ideal all-conditions ski.

Most companies still make a "consumer" race ski that is a bit softer and more forgiving and has a turn radius that falls between the true GS and SL skis - if you want to stick with something close to race ski DNA but a bit more practical around the mountain these or a set of supercross types might be good.

Simply put, there are skis out there that offer a ton of performance for strong skiers with excellent technique, and a whole lot more versatility and forgiveness as well.  There is a reason why few non-racers ski race stock skis anymore, and thus, you can't find race skis in many stores other than those that cater to racers.
post #6 of 9
Look for something 78 - 82 mm under foot with an 18 m radius.
post #7 of 9

Similar to how the mountain bike world finally started making bikes that fit what most riders want to do as opposed to just making the lightest possible race bikes, there are many non-race skis that are much more than enough for most good skiers.  I have a pair of Fischer SC's from a few years ago that would fit the bill as an almost slalom race ski.  Lots of fun on the groomed and even fairly aggressive bump skiing.  Love them.  It's a quiver ski, though.  Wouldn't recommend as an only ski unless you're solely into hard pack groomers and bumps.  For example, my Metrons (a popular ski a few years ago) can perform almost as well but are far more competent in trees and anything off piste.

 

Where do you plan on skiing?  What do you plan on skiing?

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
I'll move into the modern world armed with your advice.  I had to laugh after reading the above posts - my Rossi's can be unforgiving - if you get lazy you are going down!  LOL.  Unfortunately now that I'm in my mid 40's, at the end of an 8  to 9hr workout, sun setting,  high altitude air, legs aching, trying to get in one last mogul run, I've got to REALLY focus, almost be on guard.  I guess I thought all skiis were like this.     

I took my old Rossi's in for one last tune-up and will retire them, respectfully, at the end of this season.  I've spent the last two seasons skiing the Allegheny mountains now that I am based out of Pittsburgh; this terrain is not world-class like Snowbird/Alta/A-basin but is big enough to get hurt on and I've got the scars to prove it.  Seven-Springs is the local resort here and is more than what my young kids can handle - my current focus is keeping them outta the trees.

Great advice & thanks to all... stay healthy, stay positive.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski View Post





Welcome to the new world. It is very different to the old world you are coming from.

Before you even start thinking about what skis to use have a look at some of the current ski movies to get an idea where the sport has progressed in the last 10 years to get an idea of what is possible now. This is probably as good a place as any to start => www.youtube.com/watch

Racers are no longer top of the pile, the freeskiers have well and truly revolutionized the sport and the benefit is skis which are far more versatile and fun than ever before. And you don't even have to do the spinny flippy jumps if you don't want to!

 
Great film. How many people get to ski powder like that though?
I used to want the Volkl 5 Stars for carving groomers. If my slopes also have powder, how do I pick a compromise?
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