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A question for the Tahoe Backcountry Skiers

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
 Can someone recommend a place to go Backcountry skiing that has no to very little avalanche potential? I ducked under a rope on Sunday at Alpine Meadows and skied untracked powder for the first time and I love it!! I don't have any avalanche radios so I need a spot that cant slide. Also can you do it without snowshoes?

thanks in advance!!
post #2 of 26
 You are a idiot.  Thats all I got for you.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
 geez, thanks. Is this one of these "locals only" things?

I thought it was a simple question
post #4 of 26
Here's what you need to do. Take an Avalanche 1class. Then you need to get at least 4 things. A beacon, probe, shovel, and a PARTNER! Until you do that you are a complete liabilty to yourself and those around you. This is about a nice an answer you will get when you make a post like that.

You may get a better response here: http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/index.php They are a lot nicer over there.
post #5 of 26
 No is not a "local only thing", I called you a idiot because your statement is idiotic.  Your ignorance scares me.   Take a avalanche course and learn how to use a "avalanche radio" before you even think about going into the backcountry.  Hopefully, you listen to me, otherwise I'm afraid you will either kill yourself or worse yet someone else.
post #6 of 26
There's a lot to learn, takes at least a lot of reading, talking, clinics, experience. you are approaching it lackadasically, unfortunately. don't start by ducking ropes, that advise I can offer.
post #7 of 26
This one, boys and girls, could get ugly in a hurry.  We lose a couple of these guys each year in Colorado.  Usually they are found by hikers in the spring/summer with dung near them. 
post #8 of 26
coyotes take a meal as well. mmm, inexperienced rope ducker, tasty, tastes kind of like chicken.
post #9 of 26
You all realize that by creatively documenting these exploits, you can make a few bucks and nominate someone(s) for an award......a Darwin Award,

Quote:
Awards have been given for people who "do a service to Humanity by removing themselves from the gene pool".

or at least an honorable mention.

(NSFW)



Here is a list of avalanche accidents.
Note the ones near ski areas.
Edited by Alpinord - 3/2/10 at 10:35am
post #10 of 26
You're gonna get some pretty rough responses posting like you did -- you showed that you don't know a lot about the dangers of the backcountry. Every year dozens of people die in the BC because they're unprepared and don't know what they're getitng themselves into -- There have been 18 deaths in the US so far this year -- a lot of them in terrain that is lift accessed back country.

There are a lot of people here much more knowledgable than me, but I know enough to be careful. If you want powder and you're not used to finding it, get up to the mountain early after a dump, ski the trees in bound. There are people who will help you out if you get in trouble when you're inbounds -- out of bounds, you may be dead before anyone comes to help.

As mentioned above, take a class, do a bunch of reading -- the guys at the UAC have a good amount of educational material, and I'm sure that the Tahoe equivalent is great too. Read reports of how people are getting in trouble. http://www.avalanche.org/accidents.php is a database of reports on avalanche fatalities -- good info here.

The reason you're not getting much helpful info is that your first post shows that you don't know what you're getting yourself into and no one here is going to be responsible for killing you.

Hire a guide, find a knowledgable mentor, or go cat skiing if you want to get into the backcountry -- following random directions on the internet is a good way to get dead, not get the goods.
post #11 of 26
Don't duck ropes.  Patrollers put ropes up for your safety.  In the backcountry, what looks like a beautiful "run" is often really an avalanche terrain trap.  I've skiied OOB at Meadows (with a local guide!), and didn't duck any ropes to do it. 

You don't have to go out of bounds to get untracked at Alpine Meadows.  Often just a little bit of hiking or traversing inbounds is enough to get access to the goods, and much safer. 
post #12 of 26
google tram face avalanche for some recent video if you have any illusions that it can't happen at a resort side country closed area.
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
 So Ive skied untracked powder in the resort before, just not from the top to the bottom. The rope was being cut by a good few people, I skied down to the condos. I don't think it was "closed" I think it was just the edge of the trail. I really dont know. At first I felt really bad about this post, then I realized that I was not mean spirited and that some of you are just jerks. 

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

How did snowshoe Thompson ever survive? How many BC skiers here have been buried in an avalanche? Ill bet half the people in this thread have never skied the backcountry. People love creating fear, personally I think there is a way to go BC skiing at least once without all that. I talked to an actual bc skier and he told me to wait until spring and to go out early on a cold day, do something mellow. He  said I could rent gear if I wanted. None of you "idiots" said that.

have fun calling me more names, I really dont care
post #14 of 26
Alpine meadows does have an open boundary policy but may have closed access to some parts for your protection.  I don't remember exactly what was open or closed that day to know if you entered a closed area or just ski'd past the ski boundary signs but in general if they have something closed its for good reason.

Having said that, you really should have the knowledge, equipment and a partner when skiing out of bounds.  It's not only your life you are endangering, its those who you may trigger an avalanche upon and those who will be searching for you if something goes wrong.  There are multiple places in the general tahoe area where you can take classes and as a bonus surely meet some people that are also interested in the backcountry.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post

 So Ive skied untracked powder in the resort before, just not from the top to the bottom. The rope was being cut by a good few people, I skied down to the condos. I don't think it was "closed" I think it was just the edge of the trail. I really dont know. At first I felt really bad about this post, then I realized that I was not mean spirited and that some of you are just jerks. 

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

How did snowshoe Thompson ever survive? How many BC skiers here have been buried in an avalanche? Ill bet half the people in this thread have never skied the backcountry. People love creating fear, personally I think there is a way to go BC skiing at least once without all that. I talked to an actual bc skier and he told me to wait until spring and to go out early on a cold day, do something mellow. He  said I could rent gear if I wanted. None of you "idiots" said that.

have fun calling me more names, I really dont care

 

We're just trying to help not get yourself killed, idiot. Don't take it to the heart but we want you to live. That's why we suggest that you have a good idea about what the hell you're doing OB, such as avvy prone slopes and such and using avvy equipment to save yourself and others if you get in one. At least take an avvy basic course, like HAT in Val D'Isere to say the least so you go even the tiniest idea. Be safe out there.
post #16 of 26
good book about how many people are involved in a BC slide that burries skiers: My Dog Merle, Adventures of a free thinking dog  I think that's the title.
post #17 of 26
Food for thought:

http://www.sierraavalanchecenter.org/node/513

Admittedly, not everyone above expressed their concerns in the most productive way. Be safe. 
post #18 of 26
 Dont sweat it Brian.. there are alot of grizzled veterans here It may be for your own good but I realy think many have anger, self esteem issues Just pretend your the best skier on the planet and you'll fit right in...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post

 So Ive skied untracked powder in the resort before, just not from the top to the bottom. The rope was being cut by a good few people, I skied down to the condos. I don't think it was "closed" I think it was just the edge of the trail. I really dont know. At first I felt really bad about this post, then I realized that I was not mean spirited and that some of you are just jerks. 

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

How did snowshoe Thompson ever survive? How many BC skiers here have been buried in an avalanche? Ill bet half the people in this thread have never skied the backcountry. People love creating fear, personally I think there is a way to go BC skiing at least once without all that. I talked to an actual bc skier and he told me to wait until spring and to go out early on a cold day, do something mellow. He  said I could rent gear if I wanted. None of you "idiots" said that.

have fun calling me more names, I really dont care

 
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post

 So Ive skied untracked powder in the resort before, just not from the top to the bottom. The rope was being cut by a good few people, I skied down to the condos. I don't think it was "closed" I think it was just the edge of the trail. I really dont know. At first I felt really bad about this post, then I realized that I was not mean spirited and that some of you are just jerks. 

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

How did snowshoe Thompson ever survive? How many BC skiers here have been buried in an avalanche? Ill bet half the people in this thread have never skied the backcountry. People love creating fear, personally I think there is a way to go BC skiing at least once without all that. I talked to an actual bc skier and he told me to wait until spring and to go out early on a cold day, do something mellow. He  said I could rent gear if I wanted. None of you "idiots" said that.

have fun calling me more names, I really dont care

 

I'm not going to call you an idiot, but I know exactly where you skied and you weren't exactly in huge danger, but that isn't the point. Cutting a rope is a ticket to getting lost, or killed. Do you have any idea how many people have skied off the backside of Alpine Meadows then had to be rescued??  The answer is a lot, in fact the patrol can almost tell you to within a quarter mile where they will end up. There are places just outside the boundary at Alpine that will slide easily and will kill you or at the very least mess you up bad.

I think the responses you got here were people trying to make you understand the danger of not knowing what you are doing, in the backcountry. I know it is the "cool" thing to be these days is a backcountry skier, in fact there are places in Tahoe that I will no longer backcountry ski, because they are over ran by people that are just flat STUPID and clueless and therefore can put my life in danger by their actions. That is the bottom line, is that if you do something stupid in the backcountry your actions can effect a lot of people not just you.

I don't know where you find people to teach you this, but the first thing is you need the gear. Not renting it, buying it, touching it, owning it. A "avalanche radio" or transceiver is something you need be very familiar with if you intend on going into the back country. Take a avalanche course please, this will teach you the basis of snow science, that would also be a place to find a partner and then go slow, you have to crawl before you can walk. I was lucky my friends when I started going into the back country were patrollers and guides in AK, the amount of knowledge these people have pasted on to me has helped keep me safe and more importantly the people around me in the backcountry safe as well. 

The point of skiing in the backcountry is to connect with the mountains and your friends and well to get some untracked snow, NOT to end up dead.  To do this you have to have a basic knowledge base. 
post #20 of 26
There are also grizzled veterans with tons of BC experience, been on body recovers, know how to read and use the search function and realize their mortality, as well as that of the young and dumb and full of c=m with an attitude based on ignorance and bravado, not experience, skill or wisdom.

Initially, I thought this was a troll and then realized the unbelievable ignorance that is growing within the younger 'invincible' crowd. Sometimes the only thing that gets into thick skulls is a slap aside the head.

Also realize that responses here are not just targeted at the OP but the lurkers who do know how to use the search function regarding this topic which comes up over and over and over and over again.....and obviously will unless we, TGR and Warren Miller add safety emphasis to glorified untracked powder and BC stoke.

The local SAR has a T-shirt that is something to the effect:

"Interfering with Natural Selection"

If nothing else, hopefully harshness will sink into thicker skulls at the moment of decision regarding hitting a powder stash.
Edited by Alpinord - 3/7/10 at 8:17am
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?
I talked to an actual bc skier and he told me to wait until spring and to go out early on a cold day, do something mellow. He  said I could rent gear if I wanted. None of you "idiots" said that.

Brian, use your Brain. As has been posted, it is foolish to ski the BC without an experienced partner when your starting out. Maybe the dood you spoke to will help you out once you have rented the correct gear, read and practiced how to use it. If this will be a regular gig for you, then just buy the gear, attend the training classes and make friends with some new partners you meet at the classes.
Think buddy and stay safe. Also, your not the only one out there, so don't put others in danger due to lack of training. Thanks
post #22 of 26
 Ya going in harsh always works with the hard headed.. Funny talking to people like they are azz holes never really worked with me when I was younger..id just tell you where to go.. You can be NICE and give advice too.. and more often than not, get better results

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

There are also grizzled veterans with tons of BC experience, been on body recovers, know how to read and use the search function and realize their mortality, as well as that of the young and dumb and full of c=m with an attitude based on ignorance and bravado, not experience, skill or wisdom.

Initially, I thought this was a troll and then realized the unbelievable ignorance that is growing within the younger 'invincible' crowd. Sometimes the only thing that gets into thick skulls is a slap aside the head.

Also realize that responses here are not just targeted at the OP but the lurkers who do know how to use the search function regarding this topic which comes up over and over and over and over again.....and obviously will unless we, TGR and Warren Miller add safety emphasis to glorified untracked powder and BC stoke.

The local SAR has a T-shirt that is something to the effect:

"Interfering with Natural Selection"

If nothing else, hopefully harshness will sink into thicker skulls at the moment of decision regarding hitting a powder stash.
 
post #23 of 26
Brian--
You're right about a lot of the egos here on the site--and their condescending response to your initial (albeit ignorant) question.

A couple of suggestions: Join tahoe's Search and Rescue Team: they do a lot of training for both the winter and the summer members, and you will learn a lot more about how tahoe's terrain responds.  And you will see, first hand, what happens to those who don't know any better.  You will also be volunteering for others: a win/win.

Second, Lake Tahoe Community College has tons of wilderness training classes that won't cost you an arm and a leg.  Check them out and get yourself some knowledge. 
post #24 of 26
I'm not a BC skier. I do not have the gear or the education to do it. I have been in a few small avies in the slackcountry and that was enough to keep me out of the BC until I am prepared. Anyone else know what it's like to have a truck load of snow go pass you? If that doesn't scare you your not on the right page.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post

So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

 How many BC skiers here have been buried in an avalanche? Ill bet half the people in this thread have never skied the backcountry.

Brian, we've all done stupid things and survived.  It isn't a question weather you'll get away "doing it just once"  (how many people get pregnanat that way), it is just that it is not a good idea to head out there without knowing what you are doing. 

And yes many of us here are avid backcountry skiers, and have been in the damn things.  It isn't fun.

This won't give you an idea of what it is like in person.  It is much worse.

http://vimeo.com/6581009
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BriantheBrain View Post
 
So tell me this- A person that has never skied backcountry before has to take a class, buy a ton of gear and meet a knowledgeable partner before he or she ever try it once?

 

If you're looking for a more accessible introduction, I can recommend http://www.alpineskills.com/bcsm_intro.html .  It's a Truckee-area one-day on-slope introductory class including rental of all the equipment you need for $169.
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