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binding settings

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
After loosing 30 pounds, should the binding settings be adjusted.  I had a nasty fall in Park City and I was surprised that the bindings didn't pop.  I am 5'8 around 185 lbs.
post #2 of 11
A 30-pound weight difference would most likely necessitate a binding adjustment--go to a ski shop and have the technician change them (or do some internet research to find the binding settings and set them yourself if you are comfortable going that route); I think that you'll find that the current settings (if set for you @30 lbs heavier) are too high.
post #3 of 11
Use the below link to check the setting they have been at at your old weight and if the 30 lbs loss makes a difference.  Congrats on dropping the extra weight.   

www.dinsetting.com   
post #4 of 11
Nothing should change until you get below 148 pounds.  Your height should have been the default start point since it was higher up on the chart than your weight.
post #5 of 11
No matter what the DIN chart says you should be at, my feeling is that if you've had a fall and you felt like the skis should have released, but didn't, then you should adjust them down a bit (.5 to 1.0 down).  There is no exact science to all the binding setting methodology even if the industry tries to make it sound like that it is exact.  Bindings have different designs and some can be run lower and some need to be run higher than what the DIN chart says. 

My goal (after my accident) is to run my bindings at the lowest possible setting that doesn't pre-release on me.  As long as I'm skiing smooth I'm fine.  I'd rather lose a ski than lose a leg again.
post #6 of 11
 Noodler, very true.  I always tell people that they if they are not sure where they should be (via skier type) to always err on the side of safety and go with the lower setting.  I also always let people know that when I set and test a binding, I am making sure it releases properly, and while some bindings do release is different ways, all bindings must release (both directions torsionally through the toe and vertically in the heel) between predetermined torque settings.  I am not going to lie though, there are a lot of techs that will not actually test a binding or "flub" it through a binding tester.
post #7 of 11
One problem when being the crash test dummy finding the 'pre-release or not' margin, is the crashes can be worse than the alternative in the wrong conditions.
post #8 of 11
 Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

One problem when being the crash test dummy finding the 'pre-release or not' margin, is the crashes can be worse than the alternative in the wrong conditions.

That certainly could be the case, but I've never hurt anything when losing a ski (even through multiple double ejections).  I've only been hurt when my skis haven't come off (knock on wood).
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

 Quote:


That certainly could be the case, but I've never hurt anything when losing a ski (even through multiple double ejections).  I've only been hurt when my skis haven't come off (knock on wood).
I hear ya' (knock on wood). 

I typed that in jest while rubbing my poor shoulder. I demoed a pair of skis with the DIN at 6 on Griffons (my PX are at 8). I jambed bumps and was fine until I was ejected on a small depression on a blue cruiser.....then again in the trees . Not to confidence building. I was fine when smooth and a variety of situations, except for one downward/forward position.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
looked at the settings last night and was surprised to see the setting at 7.  Now I am wondering if the bindings are defective.  The K2 Skis/Marker bindings are only 1 year old.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

 Quote:


That certainly could be the case, but I've never hurt anything when losing a ski (even through multiple double ejections).  I've only been hurt when my skis haven't come off (knock on wood).
 
This could be the case when you're skiing blue groomers.  However, last weekend I was on a new pair of skis.  Skied trees half of Saturday and all Sunday morning.  Then Saturday afternoon taught a beginners class, one student bumped into me, and a ski released.  The impact was so low that I only heard the click, but hardly felt anything.  I'm just glad it did not happen in the trees.

The DIN calculator puts me at 7, because I'm 51.  Two years ago, I would have been at 8.5.  I'm in better shape than most 41 year olds.  There's a big difference between 7 and 8.5.  This just goes to prove the point that the setting is just a guideline, and that it really needs to be adjusted individually.  I agree - start on the lower end, but don't assume that lower = safer.  The lesson I learned is that I won't take a brand new pair into really adventurous terrain. 
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