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Epoxy To Use For Skis

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
It's either me or Atomic but I need to repair the skis that replace the ski I got as warranty replacements.

Metron 11B5 -  the tail split so it looks like the sole of your shoe separated from the rest of the shoe.  It has a faux twin tip and goes from the tip to just before it curls up.

My current plan is to rough up the inside with sand paper, use an epoxy and then clamp.  I'm hoping to get this done fairly quickly since I want to continue using them for instructing and my L1 exam in two weeks. 

My question is what is the right epoxy to use?  Gorilla Glue?  Find a marine grade epoxy?

Since when the tail flaps are pressed together, everything goes together smoothly, I don't see a need to scrape out the old epoxy/foam or whatever else is in there.  I'm not overly concerned since it is on the tail passed the running surface.  I just don't want it hanging down when I'm skiing.

Thanks,
Ken
post #2 of 9
Devcon 2 Ton Epoxy

30 minute work time
120 minute handle time

I like mine in the dual syringe for easy measuring. Got some cooking right now on some core shots.

Your method sounds good. I would be careful about trying to clean out the void unless it is particularly dirty. You run the risk of leaving chunks of material that will make it hard to close the opening later.

Make sure you use a lot of clamps along with a steel plate (I use my cabinet scraper) or steel bar above and below to spread the pressure around. Put a lot in, let it flow in to the opening by gravity so the opening is up and where you want the epoxy to flow inside the ski is down. Avoid using a tool too much to move the epoxy as you will introduce voids (air bubbles) that may or may not relieve themselves. Once the epoxy has adequately flowed into the opening, clamp the repair tight. Lots of epoxy should flow out of the seam, wipe some off, but leave the repair with some excess around the seam.

Leave the skis and don't get anxious to move them. Let them cure for at least 3 - 4 hours at room temperature. You can use a task light (100w or less) to focus some heat on the repair but not closer than 12". Save the stir stick and stir bowl that you mixed the epoxy in to test the set. When the stir bowl epoxy is solid wait at least as long again. I've ruined many repairs by not waiting long enough for the epoxy to cure. You'd think I'd have learned the first time, but noooooo!

Clean yourself and your work area up with white vinegar. It is a super epoxy solvent while the epoxy is still wet.

Once the ski has cured, release the clamps. Use a panser file to remove the excess you deliberately left so that you have a nice clean, finished looking repair. You can use sand paper after the file for even more polish.
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

You can use a task light (100w or less) to focus some heat on the repair but not closer than 12". Save the stir stick and stir bowl that you mixed the epoxy in to test the set. When the stir bowl epoxy is solid wait at least as long again. I've ruined many repairs by not waiting long enough for the epoxy to cure. You'd think I'd have learned the first time, but noooooo!

A $20 drugstore heating pad like women use for cramp relief makes a great wraparound for epoxy cures.
post #4 of 9
I almost didn't mention the heat treatment as heat will make a quicker, but weaker bond.
post #5 of 9
I second the recommendation for the DevCon 30-minute 2-ton epoxy, as it works great for ski repair.  In reality, any epoxy with a cure time >= 30 minutes will be fine.  Don't use the quicker cure stuff as it's not nearly as flexible (plus, you want as much work time as possible).

In a pinch, I have zip tied my ski boot dryers/heaters around the repair area of the ski to improve curing.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
The Really Big Race Febraury 27 2010 016.JPG

This is a picture that goes with the above post.

Thanks for the speedy replies.  I will let it air cure for a couple of days.  I'm not in a rush and have other skis I can use in the mean time.  Hope to find the epoxy tomorrow on the way home from work.

Thanks for the clean up tips too.  Wouldn't have thought of white vinegar.
post #7 of 9
OWW!   The steel edges came off?
post #8 of 9
All really good advise above. 

 The right epoxy is important. It should have certain characteristics because of the environment in which it will be used in.
 I use an epoxy from a company called SYSTEM THREE I bought it from a store called WOODCRAFT. You could probably find similar at West Marine. WOODCRAFT sells to fine furniture makers or DIYers. Great stuff. I also use it to fill old open binding holes in my many used skis. Much better than the plastic screw with head snap off way. This epoxy takes about three days to go off completely. It comes with a mixing tip so you get exactly the right mix. Once it goes off it remains flexible as the material around it.

  I really prefer to do my gluing in the summer.  I set the cleaned ski in the sun for about three hours while I'm doing other things. For a natural full ski heat up. If I feel that it doesn't or won't get warm enough during the day. I'll wait for a better day. This way the epoxy resin gets more liquefied and sinks into the coarse exposed fibers more.  For a "delam"  I use a rubber tipped Pony spring loaded clamp. They hold like a pissed off Lobster with just that right amount of pressure.

 Speaking of binding screws. I've found that sealing them with an automotive Teflon sealant works very well. It also has a slight flex to it, doesn't shrink or degrade over time as some other common glues do.  It is designed to work in the temperatures beyond what a ski will see and then some. Overkill, if you will.
Edited by skimalibu - 2/28/10 at 6:28pm
post #9 of 9
I haven't looked into the specifics of the epoxy's listed above, but a key feature to look for is that you are going to want an epoxy with a high peel strength
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