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Parrifin Wax for cleaning new skis

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
 On a pair of new (from the factory) skis, could I use a generic parrafin wax (like you would buy in a 10# block) to iron on and scrape until clean, and then replace it with a quality base prep wax?  Or rather, is it bad for the bases?

Thank you
post #2 of 17
Nope. That's a perfectly good idea. It's not bad for the bases. The "quality base prep" waxes are mostly paraffin too. Just make sure it's plain, generic paraffin, sans scents or other random additives. The stuff you can get at the grocery store is fine.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
 Excellent 

Thank You
post #4 of 17
I use it all the time.  Just resist the temptation to SKI on it.  It is too soft and the skis will be horribly slow.... just ask my youngest boy from when dad didn't have time for that last pair of skis

AM.
post #5 of 17
Hahahahaha,

Nahh.

I get away with red candle recycling all the time. Just use an oxy-aceteline torch..
post #6 of 17
 Sure you could, but question is why would you. When you pay 500+ eur for skis, expense for waxes (unless you go fluoro way) is really small. I don't know exact prices, and most likely in store things are a bit more expensive, but I get 1kg box of Swix CH waxes for around 25eur. And with 1kg you are good for quite some time. So to be honest, I don't know why would you want to bother with normal paraffin. 
Non-fluoro waxes are based on paraffin, but they are not just paraffin. So using real ski wax is definitely better way to go. Afterall you are waxing skis with a reason, and, at least for me, this reason is different then just excuse to spend time in basement ;)
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
 My reason is to clean the bases because I have 20 pounds of pure parrafin wax sitting around here.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine View Post

 My reason is to clean the bases because I have 20 pounds of pure parrafin wax sitting around here.
Sure it's fine, but why saturate your base with it?  You will be better served to use a broad range graphite wax for that.  If you do, each time your day wax wears off, you will then be on a wax that will perform much better in most any condition.  If I were you, I'd make a bunch of red candles, then sell them to the guy above!   Wax IN not ON!
post #9 of 17
He's just talking about hot scraping.

In any event, I think paraffin would, if anything, be better for saturating bases than graphite wax. Yellow wax ~ paraffin, to several decimal places.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post

. Yellow wax ~ paraffin, to several decimal places.

Ah but which paraffin?   

Salmon is seafood to several decimal places; should I substitute generic seafood for salmon recipes?
post #11 of 17
Plain, unmodified paraffin wax without additives (what's marked paraffin in supermarkets).

In other, more elaborate words, yellow wax ~ what's marked paraffin in supermarkets (plus a little yellow dye). Salmon ~ what's marked salmon in supermarkets (not that great an analogy, since there are different kinds and preparations of salmon, but it wasn't mine).

Not kerosene, no matter what the Brits say.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post

He's just talking about hot scraping.

In any event, I think paraffin would, if anything, be better for saturating bases than graphite wax. Yellow wax ~ paraffin, to several decimal places.

I'm using graphite all the time.  Seems to work pretty darn good.  I used to start with the yellow red blue etc. saturation, but since I've been soaking with broad range graphite I have not looked back.  I figure why use yellow to hot scrape when you can use the broad range graphite.  This way I'm pretty sure of the properties of my saturation.  Where I ski the snow from top to bottom can change a lot, so I guess that's why I like the broad range wax.  Anyway hot scrape away!  You will be fine.

So johnston, you think I should loose the graphite?  Will I have better glide without it?  I guess the OP could mix some pencil "lead" with that block of wax, then he might have something! 
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post

Plain, unmodified paraffin wax without additives (what's marked paraffin in supermarkets).


Which is a statistical mix of molecular weights, depending on which refiner made it and from which feedstock at which refinery.       Much like buying something hypothetically  labeled "seafood"  in a 2-lb bag is probably going to be shrimps and scallops and other fish bits depending on who caught what, when and where.
 

In other, more elaborate words, yellow wax ~ 

     My point is that a "paraffin" that is either more refined to a specific molecular weight or one that has after-the-fact branching add-ons and modifications would still be a "paraffin" to one or two degrees of precision but quite possibly considerably different in ski-waxing behavior (base wetting, cohesion, thermal capacity) than "department store paraffin".

Does this mean "department store paraffin" is bad for the ski?  No.    Does that mean whatever-color-ski-wax, while being  paraffin based, can be considerably different from "department store paraffin"?  You betcha.
post #14 of 17

Hi,

I would like to know what is in ski wax. It sems to be a secret. There is Prul Ski Wax that has a microcrystalline wax and I read that some ski waxes are paraffin and microcystalline mix.

 

Paul

post #15 of 17

If I told you, I'd have to kill you...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiWiz View Post

Hi,

I would like to know what is in ski wax. It sems to be a secret. There is Prul Ski Wax that has a microcrystalline wax and I read that some ski waxes are paraffin and microcystalline mix.

 

Paul



 

post #16 of 17

Pure "non-additive" paraffin wax won't "clean" but will seal as it does penetrate better than just about anything.  As far as using it as the only wax, it's possible but not the best choice.  Generally a good wax job with pure paraffin (like from the grocery store) may last a day if the snow is not to abrasive. 

 

Paraffin will work well alone if the snow is wet, or if it's dry but not extremely cold.  The colder it gets the worse it works and in real cold w/o any structure you are pretty much done for.

post #17 of 17

I store my skis with a thick layer of parafin.

 

I ski it the first day if it is warm and wet, and it can be as good as a soft HC wax in those conditions.  As others have said, it can suck in cold conditions, just as any warm wax will.

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