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Snowboard package for beginner wife?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Ok, so here's the deal.  A few years ago my wife went snowboarding, just once, and liked it alot. I have just gotten back into skiing and would like to get her on the mountain as well. But, if there one thing i hate, is waiting around in a rental line when all i want to do is get to the top of the mountain. So i am interested in getting her a cheap setup.

Cheap setup, yes. But i don't want something totally crappy that she wont be able to progress on. She just needs a setup for beginners that will hold her off until she reaches an intermediate level, which at the frequency that she would actually go would probably be a few years.

What should I be looking at for her? Are there decent full packages that can be had for around $300-$350, or am i going to have to spend a considerable amount more to get her something that is at least decent?

Any help will be appreciated, as i know absolutely nothing about snowboards.

Thanks in advance!

---Joe
post #2 of 23
 Spend at least twice on your wife's gear as what you plunk down for your own is a good rule of thumb if you want her to stick with it.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Sorry, but that didn't really answer my question. My wife does not want to spend a lot of money because we do not have a lot of  money to spend that's all. And i don't want to spend a lot of money just to find out after a season or two that shit gives up on it. If she gives up on a $300 package no big deal. If she gives up after I've spent $800 I'm going to be pissed! LOL
post #4 of 23
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
^^^ WOW,  yeah that's getting steep in price. I didn't know the bindings would be so expensive. And the Boots as well since i had seen some at a local store for like $80. Are boots and bindings of this quality really necessary? Don't mean to question your intelligence or anything, its just that i know nothing about it so i don't know what are essential features in the parts to put together a setup.

Thanks for the replies!
post #6 of 23
 OK, I overstated that. Her gear doesn't have to cost twice as much as yours, but it should be at least as nice. Are you skiing in $80 boots?

If the only problem is that you don't want to wait in the rental line, put her in the line, tell her you'll meet for lunch and go skiing. 
post #7 of 23
If you buy her crappy equipment, you will waste 300 bucks; you increase the odds that she will not advance and will not like the sport.

If you buy her half-decent (but not racing level), boots and spend the money on getting them from or taking them to someone who will make sure they fit her correctly it's money well spent.  A pair of half decent boots fitted right will cost $300 buck. (mine came up to around 700 bucks on sale including footbeds and taxes).

Skis and bindings you should be able to pick up for around $150 to $250 (on sale or bargain priced left-over).  Spend $20 for a subscription to realskiers/expertskiers so you don't buy a pig-in-a-poke.  I picked up brand new Machet Gs for less than $100, and Volkl P50 F1s for about 75 including shipping, not beginner skis, but they prove the point.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
^^^ LOL, this would be good advice if i had asked about getting her skis. Unfortunately if you reread the tittle I am inquiring about snowboard gear!

I didn't know you were talking about ski gear until you started talking about $300 boots and getting them fitted. I was like " $300 for beginner snowboarding boots???  This guy is crazy! "     Haha all good though, thanks for taking the time to reply at least!
post #9 of 23
I just thought that when you found out how boarding isn't all that much cheaper, you might want to look into skis for her. 
post #10 of 23
honestly i know nothing about snowboards but i did pick up some stuff at Levelninesports.com.  there are other on-line sites that sell 'inexpensive' which may mean cheap but a few questions help.   The board i bought for my daughter was from a defunct company and while not top notch, was/is effectively disposable if she uses it more than half a dozen times.  honestly, it and no-name bindings were around $140 .. ok, i know some will say this is crazy and crap, but i have had a couple of long time boarders (an instructor at Steamboat too) say they thought they were pretty decent board and bindings.   The bindings i figure are the weakest link as I can see where if they break, there wouldn't be much one can do.

I only bought em as I felt comfortable with Level Nines comments on them as well as online comments.  Levelninesports, Evogear, local places too have name brands as well.  

My local shop had Burton Mint boots, nothing overly fancy but they were only (are now too) $80 bucks as the season in the midwest is closing.  their Burton Boards are marked down nearly 1/2 too, many were last yr but who cares .. nice boards at around $150 - $200 and they will knock a few dollars off if were to buy bindings, boots and the board.

As an FYI, my daughter is only weighing in at around 110lbs fully dressed out carrying lunch too, so board wise, she shouldn't be too rough on em.   One other item i bought, for $30/40 i bought some gloves with wrist guards, she's now using them while skiing and likes them as their mittens with a glove liner.  Given the rate of falling upon learning, figured it was a cheap investment to lower risk of injury. 

finally, besides yr end closeouts now going on, many resorts will (though you will need to stand in line again) offer lessons and lift and toss in the board rental for free, least wise, what i've noted.   My daughter did a Steamboat lesson which for $29 dollars, picked up the lift ticket.  This was a lower level class but i have noted many resorts offering some deal if you ask.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I just thought that when you found out how boarding isn't all that much cheaper, you might want to look into skis for her. 
 

I had her try skis once....  it didnt work out well at all for her. She was much happier on a snowboard and vows to never ski again. LOL
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
As far as name brands go, do some of them make really crappy stuff too?

For example, after just browsing around i see i can get this K2 setup with their basic stuff for around $320 ..  Is this stuff crap though?

http://www.skis.com/product.php?productid=128761&pconf=2000045&slot=269&p_price=179.955

http://www.skis.com/product.php?productid=128868&pconf=2000045&slot=270&p_price=62.955

http://www.skis.com/product.php?productid=128899&pconf=2000045&slot=271&p_price=71.955
post #13 of 23
 I just bought one of these...and love it!  www.bitchboards.com/SearchResults.asp  Seriously.  I don't know if your wife can get over having "bitchboard" all over her board, but as a new rider I was impressed with the price and the ride.  Oh, there was a 50% off deal a while ago, that sealed the deal for me.
post #14 of 23
 The K2 stuff looks nice. Some good deals out there this time of year.
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Well I have asked this question on a different forum that is more snowboard specific as I figured I would get more responses. I posted the k2 stuff as well and one of the member said it was nice gear for a beginner, but asked a lot of stuff about my wife including foot size (made me measure) height, weight, and area of the states that she would be riding on. He came to the conclusion that the k2 board was too soft for her weight. (190-200lbs)

He recommended me that this would be a better setup for her. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001GX0CGW/ref=s9_simh_gw_p200_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=19RW2Q6ZJHVCGZ7H32ZC&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938631&pf_rd_I=507846

Now this is obviously a very low price setup by a very unfamiliar brand. (Not that I know anything about snowboard brands, but I know this is not one of the popular ones) So this makes me a little cautious as I don't want to end up with crap. Another issue it seems is that the package is one that he sells at his web store.

On the other hand I did spend some time researching the poster and by reading his posts I can determine that he really seems to know what he is talking about, and well as the fact that he very often recommends gear to people that he does not sell of his site, which makes me think that he is giving me good advice instead of just trying to sell a product. 

So anyway, has anyone ever heard of this gear? Are they super cheap or just an up and coming company that hasn't inflated prices yet? Is this stuff actually possibly made by one of the bigger manufacturers?
post #16 of 23
 Never heard of that brand. The heat moldable liner is a nice feature.

The K2 is rated for beginner through intermediate,, This boot, designed for advanced through expert is probably more supportive, and might be a better match for your wife.

http://www.skis.com/womens-snowboard-boots/c655/dc-graphix-womens-snowboard-boots-2009-p146130.html?productid=146130&mybuyscid=8951432685

The Boa lacing system is really nice and Roxy is the premiere woman's specific brand.

http://www.skis.com/womens-snowboard-boots/c655/roxy-leilani-boa-womens-snowboard-boots-p86585.html?productid=86585&mybuyscid=8951432685
post #17 of 23
If I had to do it all over again, I'd stick with getting something similar to a Burton Cruzer that I demo'd on day 2 of riding. It was fairly soft and easily decambered. There really isn't that much difference between bindings, in my opinion. The boots are key-she needs to get boots that fit well with her toes right up to the front of the boot.
What I would do if look over product specs for Burton, Roxy, Ride. You're looking for a softer board that will allow her to learn to carve. Once you have a good list of models-freestyle boards are softer than freeride boards-check out ebay and see if you can't score something.
Once she gets comfortable on the softer board, you can go up on the stiffness. Remember, the learning curve to get to intermediate is longer for riding than it is for skiing, so don't worry about getting something that you think may limit her progression. It's going to take her longer to get there
Hope this helps...I rode for 6 years prior to taking up skiing
post #18 of 23

Check out the women's packages at the house.

I recommend sticking to rental gear until she gets off the flattest beginner terrain. Rental gear is very soft and has high bevel angles to help prevent slamming. Otherwise, get the wife a private lesson to accelerate the (sometimes painful) early learning process.

 

The learner curve to intermediate should not be longer (than for skiing) for your wife. Sometimes "forward sports" (e.g. inline skating, ice skating, water skiing) experience can interefere with sideways sports development. Since your wife has already tried skiing and prefers riding, this is highly unlikely.

post #19 of 23
 Quick guide, therusty and daysailer are the pros who have weighed in so far. The rest of us should be taken with a grain of salt. I was hoping rusty would notice this thread. 

Renting is a good idea. Picking up the stuff the night before is often an option, which would save you time in the morning.
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

Yeah, im a little inbetween advice right now. Some are saying to go softer, and some are saying to go stiffer because of her weight and icy NJ slopes. As far as a comparison between her skiing and boarding, i went with her when she went skiing and she barely got off the bunny hill. I wasnt with her when she went boarding, but she said it was alot easier for her and she was able to ride entire green trail at a decent speed without falling..  and this was her first time out with no lessons.

Im not sure if i am going to stick her in a private lesson...  they are pretty pricey around here. But i was thinking of getting her to the mountain on a weekday when it is not busy and put her into a beginner group lesson. I'd bet that there are not a whole lot of beginners taking lessons on a weekday...  most of the newbs seem to show up on the weekends...
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 92hatchattack View Post

Ok, so here's the deal.  A few years ago my wife went snowboarding, just once, and liked it alot. I have just gotten back into skiing and would like to get her on the mountain as well. But, if there one thing i hate, is waiting around in a rental line when all i want to do is get to the top of the mountain. So i am interested in getting her a cheap setup.

Cheap setup, yes. But i don't want something totally crappy that she wont be able to progress on. She just needs a setup for beginners that will hold her off until she reaches an intermediate level, which at the frequency that she would actually go would probably be a few years.

What should I be looking at for her? Are there decent full packages that can be had for around $300-$350, or am i going to have to spend a considerable amount more to get her something that is at least decent?

Any help will be appreciated, as i know absolutely nothing about snowboards.

Thanks in advance!

---Joe

I would tell you to buy used, and have it tuned up by hand.  Don't worry about minor scratches on the base.  For cheep factor a extruded base board should be the cheapest.  (Don't pay bucks for a extruded base board!)  If you don't wax, it will be better.  If you wax (better) make sure you look for a sintered base. (more cost)  Used can be got cheep, and a good tuner can make it like new if it's still got some edges left.   As for the boots, I'd tell you go new there.  Good luck to you, check craigslist etc.   Also look for old new stock at shops.  (old gear that never sold)
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

 

The learner curve to intermediate should not be longer (than for skiing) for your wife. Sometimes "forward sports" (e.g. inline skating, ice skating, water skiing) experience can interefere with sideways sports development. Since your wife has already tried skiing and prefers riding, this is highly unlikely.


I told my husband that it's not my fault that I stink at boarding...

I was able to get my Burton set-up last year for about $300.  Burton Troop, Lexa bindings, Burton Boots.  If I had to do it over again, I would probably try some type of rockered board...(those darn edges keep getting in the way).  Clearance and demo stuff should be on sale now.
post #23 of 23
For someone just learning, having a soft flex board will help them to learn much eaiser.  They don't have to fight a stiff board.  If she has legs of steel from daily strength training, she could go with little stiffer board.  I demo boards to find ones with the right amount of stiffness for me and where I intend to ride that particular board.  You could save money by buying a used board but you will have to dig around to find all the spec's for the board to make sure it is a beginner friendly board.  Rusty gave great inform about the bevel too. 

Don't get her a rocker board just yet.  That's hard to learn on for beginner's.

Spend the real money on the boots.  Take her to a real snowboard shop with snowboard bootfitters.  Every snowboard boot manuf has different fitting characteristics.  Be prepared to spend a few hours with boot fitting.  Clearance sales have started.

You can probably find used women's bindings for sale.  It will take a time investment on your part to find them.

Make sure you buy her a stomp pad for her snowboard.
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