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Does NBC's coverage--or lack thereof-- violate the Olympic spirit? - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post

Instead, they've eliminated the good quality coverage ... presumably to protect ratings for the junk. Plus they've made every effort possible to avoid anyone getting hold of any sort of decent coverage over the Internet.

Or because providing good quality coverage across the board (instead of just Comcast subscribers) would leave them in the situation of  having Comcast subscribers pay for OTA broadcasts and Internet access.    DVRs killed OTA ad revenue, and Internet ad revenue is a joke unless you're Google or Amazon.

I firmly believe Universal Sports *will* at some point show more detailed Olympic material.    I also believe that will happen after it's been written off  the Comcast books as a net loss, much like any failed network show.    So, like 6months to a year from now the Universal Sports entity gets that material for essentially *free* because Comcast took the $-hit and managed to hide it well.
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ella2001 View Post
And, although I know we're heading that way in the UK too, don't even get me started on the intrusion of the commercial breaks (and such boring commercials too).

Keep protesting against TV licence fees and that's the future.
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
I've seen curling on nearly every time slot on MSNBC, CNBC, NBC, etc. Maybe not in primetime, but definitely far more than "Tuesday afternoon". Outside of figure skating, I don't think any activity has received more thorough coverage. Laughably awful.

If you are running a real estate company and get a flood of customers in,  the first thing you do is try to move the dogs.     The prime properties are an *easy* sell, you keep those because that's what keeps the customers coming in to buy the dogs.
post #34 of 47
I have been watching all the alpine skiing events live on the CTV /  TSN internet streaming.  Its a good quality broadcast with English commentary. http://www.ctvolympics.ca/video/tsn/index.html?cid=viewersguide

I had to pay $11.50 for a one-month subscription that lets me use a VPN connection in Quebec to hide my USA IP address.  But it works.
First run of the ladies GS just ended a little bit ago.  Kind of reminiscent of the men's GS.
post #35 of 47
The obvious move is to nationalize Comcast.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

Well, how did we feel about NBC's coverage of the men's GS? I am so sick and tired of the BS voiceovers that are taped after the results are known, and the very limited coverage in terms of the actual skiers.....it's just horrific. , But we serious fans are a tiny tiny constituency. And if NBC buys the rights, they can telecast what they feel will be best for their bottom line. I think, with the internet, this will be last time we have to deal with this....I hope. It really SUCKS.

I'm sure the bobsled fans think there is too much ski coverage and the skating fans think there is too much skiing and bobsled coverage and the nordic ski fans think there is too much alpine coverage and on and on. I agree that internet and/or cable with live and replayed feeds will be the ultimate answer to satisfy everyone. After see what the've done with WC coverage you would think they would have figured out how to package it and make their money and we would be there already.
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post




If you are running a real estate company and get a flood of customers in,  the first thing you do is try to move the dogs.     The prime properties are an *easy* sell, you keep those because that's what keeps the customers coming in to buy the dogs.
 
While interesting, that analogy does not apply to television. No one's watching day after day of curling in hopes of getting to the events they actually want to see, especially not in the day and age of digital channel information (when I see that curling is what's on, I watch anything else). This might work if NBC was mixing curling with more exciting options, but it's often the only event listed.

Judging by responses here and everywhere else, no one's falling for a "dog strategy" and, if anything, NBC's terrible coverage is alienating viewers both for this Olympics and the future.

NBC just needs to clean house. It's gotten embarrassing, between poor ratings, the whole Jay Leno debacle and now failing to capitalize on what should be a huge "give-me" broadcast.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
... Jay Leno debacle ...

Maybe they should bring on David Letterman's ex-girlfriend to do Olympic reports, like she did in SLC and Torino.
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

While interesting, that analogy does not apply to television. No one's watching day after day of curling in hopes of getting to the events they actually want to see, especially not in the day and age of digital channel information (when I see that curling is what's on, I watch anything else).
 

Heh. 

You should be at my gym then.   CNBC, MSNBC, NBC are what's on (in addition to ESPN poker).

Or at my dentists' office.

Or at my parents' house.



This might work if NBC was mixing curling with more exciting options, but it's often the only event listed.
 

Again, welcome to the new media.   If you want to watch something for any sit-down length of time, pay up for cable then go download it to your home server.



Judging by responses here and everywhere else, no one's falling for a "dog strategy" and, if anything, NBC's terrible coverage is alienating viewers both for this Olympics and the future.
 

The 5-minute, 10-minute, 20-minute viewership is, in the same way they have the morning news on as they get ready.



NBC just needs to clean house. It's gotten embarrassing, between poor ratings, the whole Jay Leno debacle and now failing to capitalize on what should be a huge "give-me" broadcast.
 
   
Again, IMO NBC  is no longer a broadcast network as such.    NBC  exists to invent "channels" like SyFy and Universal Sports and USA and Bravo and qubo (and Hulu!) and to promote the branding of those "channels" for Comcast.    

The moment those channels are invented, branded, and sold (to Comcast or 3rd parties), the programming on them will be skewed towards whatever the cheapest programming for  the largest demographic watching is, without any sort of regard for the original mission of the "channel".
Edited by comprex - 2/24/10 at 5:36pm
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post




I've seen curling on nearly every time slot on MSNBC, CNBC, NBC, etc. Maybe not in prime time, but definitely far more than "Tuesday afternoon". Outside of figure skating, I don't think any activity has received more thorough coverage. Laughably awful.
 

I used "Tuesday afternoon" euphemistically as a time when few viewers are watching.  I assume that curling is cheap filler for NBC because it requires only a few camera crews, as opposed to the downhill, for example, that must require many crews to cover.  I'm certainly not trying to excuse NBC for their sorry coverage.  Other than owning some GE stock I have no stake in NBC's success or failure.  Just like many other viewers I'm just trying to figure out how and why they've decided to allocate their resources.
post #41 of 47
Quote:
I assume that curling is cheap filler for NBC because it requires only a few camera crews

I was thinking that too at first, but don't they pool the video feed? European TV certainly had footage of the entire ski races.
post #42 of 47
answering the OP question literally: yes it does violate the Olympic spirit when they narrow the coverage to such a small number of alpine skiers that it misses the idea of the competition as inclusive of the whole first seed of 25 or so, (whether or not they fit the human interest model or not).
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post



I was thinking that too at first, but don't they pool the video feed? European TV certainly had footage of the entire ski races.

I assume you're right that they pool coverage.  So I guess curling would be cheap filler for all of them.
post #44 of 47
I wonder if NBC's sorry coverage of the Olympics is not part of the death knell of network Olympic coverage anyway. Perhaps in the future the majority will be watching live streaming overage via the internet which, except perhaps in places like China, is not prevented from crossing international borders, regardless of whomever holds the national coverage franchise.
post #45 of 47
Great posts here on a very important topic.

........................

NBC sponsors are betting the farm on a full bore nationalism mentality.

When the sponsors WTFU , maybe they will brighten up and insist these netowrk media leaches honor their respective consumers by insisting that both NBC and Direct TV both, or either, fairly list which events are going to be aired when.

Any good thread about corporate whores is a joy. What's even more fun is watching Bob Costas do the sublime job of eating crow on his past zennish jouranlism stylings..
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ldrjax View Post

I assume you're right that they pool coverage.  So I guess curling would be cheap filler for all of them.

Yes: all video footage of Olympic competition is provided by the Olympic Broadcasting Service, which is run by the IOC and the local organizing committee.  A lot of the buy-in from the networks that carry the coverage (e.g. NBC, CTV, BBC) pays for the infrastructure and staff for this service.  The individual networks usually have, at most, one camera that is theirs (and that cameraperson still works under the auspices of the OBS).

What the individual networks can do is cherry-pick the feeds they want to show: which camera feeds to highlight, and so forth.  In turn, this allows them to decide what to show live and basically unedited (e.g. curling, figure skating) and what to pre-digest into pap (e.g. alpine skiing).

Anybody who was watching one of the FromSport feeds of the postponed second run today saw the raw OBS feed: no commentary, just footage.  That's where you got to hear the Canadians learning Italian from their counterparts from Italy, got to hear Julia and Chemmy sing atonally to a shared iPod, and got to hear Atle Skaardal and the race jury decide to postpone the second run in real-time.  This is the same raw footage that NBC offers as "full event archives" (as opposed to the "as seen on TV" archive).
post #47 of 47

Very good stuff ^^^^^. Thanks for the post!

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