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Popping between turns

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have been told that I am "popping up" in between turns.  While I do not have a video of the movement, a fellow instructor said that it appeared that when I fell behind on a turn, my legs would scissor (tips drastically uneven), my weight would be back, and then when I would go into the next turn, I would "pop up".  They also said that my upper/lower body separation looked really good, and the popping did not occur on every turn, so I am thinking it is related to when I get back as if you are in the back seat there is no way to retract your legs when you skis move under your body. 

After taking a few runs on both my SL and GS boards with the comment in mind, I think that I am popping more when I get my hips closer to the snow.  Maybe my skis are getting ahead of me during the turn which would cause my ankles to open up, thus putting me in the back seat, leading to my inability to absorb the transition. 

Does anyone have any insight into this problem?  I am sure it has been discussed before but I could not find the correct search keywords.  Is there anything I can do or work on to correct this problem?

Thanks
post #2 of 10
 video please
post #3 of 10
Try skiing with your boots unbuckled a few runs. That will usually give you a lot of information on your balance.
post #4 of 10
Are you down-unweigthing or up-unweighting?
post #5 of 10
smoth - without a video its hard to say anything for sure but to me it sounds like you are used to up-unweighting your turns. When you fall back into the back seat your problems grow bigger and you need a more abrupt up-move to start a new turn. Same thing when your hip is close to the snow. From there its a longer way up for you to extend and head popping stands out more clearly.

I dont think that your head popping and your back seat problems are linked. Two different issues. You talk about retracting your leg in order to get out of the back seat. I would like to suggest that your back seat problem comes from you not being forward oriented enough. You need to bend more at the waist and strech your arms out front. This upper body position should be kept more or less stable the whole time. Curve your back and lower your head. Then extend and flex your legs independently of your upper body. Try to keep your stance foot back and your hips forwards through out the whole turn. The ide is to have shin pressure all the time when skis are pressured. Your inside ski will be less pressured so dont expect to get equal ammount of shin pressure. See that your boots are not too stiff or too upright. You did not say what level you are but I think that too stiff boots can be a bad thing.

Your head popping comes from your up-unweighting technique. Work on tipping insted. And try to work on ski rebound and float. Check out the ILE and the OLF consepts and cross over/under techniques.
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

You talk about retracting your leg in order to get out of the back seat.

 
I think he meant that when you are in the back seat it is not possible to retract. This is an important observation, becuase I don't think it is possible to get out of the backseat without increasing tail pressure until you are back in balance. I think this often leads to a subconcious push just before release, and it can feel like a pop. This is similar to "kick-the-can" but in that case it is done from a balanced position to get more projection into the next turn.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Jamt, that is what I was referring to.  If you get back and your outside leg is extended and the inside is retracted your ankle will have to open up in order to keep your skis in contact with the snow.  From this position, I cannot think of a way to do a cross under style transition which is why I was thinking that the two may be related.  If I understand the move correctly, you must bring both of your knees up to your chest before you can extend your new outside leg if you do not want your upper body to pop up.  (maybe this is where my problem lies)  Skeletally, I think this progression makes sense. 

I think I can borrow video equipment from my school, so I will try to get some footage this weekend if I manage to get all of my papers done before spring break.  (I have never seen myself ski, so I am sure other problem areas will come out as well.)
post #8 of 10
 First of all, if you are scissoring forward your inside ski, that is a problem; totally aside from any popping that may or may not exist.   Work on that first.  That has more to do with the fact that you are falling into your inside ski during the turn.  Work on that first.  After you stop scissoring, you can check to see if you still have pop issues as a separate concern.
post #9 of 10
this might be what is happenning:

if you scissor / push the inside ski forward AND hold on to that turn too long,
 your weight will tend to end up on the tail of the now uphill ski, as your feet will be ahead of your hips.

without a progressive move of the COM across the skis, you end up "popping" to
get your COM once again inside the arc of the skis as you start the next turn

if you never get so far back (ie hips keep with feet), you dont need that pop
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoth View Post

If I understand the move correctly, you must bring both of your knees up to your chest before you can extend your new outside leg if you do not want your upper body to pop up.  (maybe this is where my problem lies)  Skeletally, I think this progression makes sense.
 

There are different degrees of flexing through the transition. If you do it as radically as you suggest, bringing your knees up against your chest, then there is offcourse less up-ward motion during edge change. However, you will be in the back seat during transition. You cannot pull your skis back underneath you to be balanced in the for/aft plane as long as you have flexed legs with a 90deg knee angle. Something you have to take in consideration. Thats why its only possible as you link turns and make good use of the rebound.


Quote:
Originally Posted by smoth View Post

Jamt, that is what I was referring to.  If you get back and your outside leg is extended and the inside is retracted your ankle will have to open up in order to keep your skis in contact with the snow.  From this position, I cannot think of a way to do a cross under style transition which is why I was thinking that the two may be related. 
 

I dont understand what you are trying to say here....
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