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Since when did the U.S. Ski Team race uniform color become lime green/orange ?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Don't get me wrong, I think Ted Ligety is an incredible athlete and one of the best U. S. Ski teamers ever, but it seems to me that he has become more of a rebel than Bode and that the color of his race suit was just an example of "Let's self promote my company "Shred" goggles and helmet, than be a team member (a common comment against Bode the last 4-6 years) and compete in a race suit (albeit a Spyder with USA on the side) that matches my helmet and goggles, rather than the color (blue with red/white stripes) that every other competing U. S. Ski team athlete is wearing. I would be sincerely interested in knowing which ranking US team official sanctioned that color choice. And, yes, I recognize and understand that all those figure skating competitors wear different colors (e.g. Evan Lysacek's black outfit). So, does Ligety ski for Slovenia or the Netherlands or team "Shred"?
post #2 of 14

I had the same reaction, just in terms of the suit not fitting in with the rest of the program. When I watched the NBC coverage last night, and they mentioned Ligety and showed him in the start house form the back, my quick reaction was that it was some Slovenian! Was talking with a friend who I think is pretty much in the know, and he said it had something to do with Ted being the defending gold medalist in the combined, and the USST giving him his choice of colors for his suit. Kind of like the suits that LV has worn on the WC. I think that makes sense. Wasn't he in a normal USA suit in the SG? Hopefully we won't see it in the GS or SL. Thing is hideous. I'm actually pretty impressed with what he"s done with Shred, just agree that it doesn't need to creep into the Olympics.

post #3 of 14
Ok I didn't mix him with our guys (we have nicer green :P) but it still felt weird. To be honest, I don't like Lindsey having different suit on WC, even though her was normally nicer then standard US suit, but still. It's one team, even if they train outside of team, and team should have same colors. Talking about Slovenians, Maze is on her own too, yet she's still wearing team clothes. Sure her team members have their own clothes with their own sponsors (not on Olympics of course), but she's in national colors. And I think it's good idea. Afterall, they all race under same flag for same country, not to Team A-Maze (Maze), Team America or whatever they call their "team". As long as WC, WCH and Olympics are like they are (racing for your country, not for your team, factory, sponsor), things should stay same. Once they will change it, and there will private teams racing on WC, then they can wear whatever that team will be wearing. But even then... can Kobe play in his own colors or he has to wear Lakers jersey? I guess he plays in Lakers colors, even if he might not like it.
post #4 of 14
That had me baffled too.   I think it looks cool....but inappropriate since he is representing Team USA.

I thought these guys all have to wear the same outfits?  I also noticed Bode had the Superfund helmet on in earlier races (with the logo removed) and now hes sporting what looks to be a homemade paint job.

Bode was using custom suits in the WC then stopped once he came back to the USST, but Vonn continues to use custom suits.

Mancuso also had a different color than everyone else, the blues in her suit match her Lange boots, everyone elses is darker.

Anyone notice Bode's blacked out Leki WC gloves....whats with that?

Many of the racers of all nations had some logos blanked out but not others.   I think Vonn's helmet had the TroyLee whited out.   I even saw a skier (Ski Cross) that had the ski google name on the frame taped over.....don't know if he had to do it or if he just chooses to not advertise the google if they are not paying him...but the band did have a logo that could clearly be seen.

Speaking of outfits.....how about the snowboarders with pants that are made to look like ripped jeans?   While its cool that they can do that with technical gear.....I think its a horrible choice for members of a professional national team....or I am getting old.
post #5 of 14
This was part of the sponsorship deal Spyder made with the US Ski Team...having defending champions choose their own suit. Since people are talking about it, I guess It is generating the "buzz" they intended it to do.
post #6 of 14
Ahh......now we know!
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
OK, I get that the reigning event gold medalist gets to choose the color, but I think Mancuso may a much better color selection albeit, it does match her boots (Lange) and helmet(POC). Maybe Ted should have made a better color choice from Shred to wear to set up the suit match. I'm just sayin"
post #8 of 14
I think that Bode made the helmet change, just to make sure that he didn't get hung up on any issues related to sponsorship, and running afoul of the ancient olympic rules. The green stripes, I think are part of Superfund's logo. Probably the same deal with the gloves. When in doubt, ditch the logo. Just guessing. 35 years ago remember skiers even covering theie very basic ski graphics with duct tape during the Olympics? As I recall in 1972, Dynamic's logo was a touch bigger than the rules allowed. Like ANY of theis skiers are amateur athletes!

Bode had the special suits the year after he won his last WC overall. He and Lindsay had their own suits. Bode, as I recall was almost always in the kelly green Spyder suit. That was also during his independent Team America time. You may recall that Kjus was a big sponsor ot Team America, and he and his guys has some very sweet Kjus stuff. He had bright red Kjus suits that he's train in, and I think he raced in them during a few Nor Ams. But when you ski in a WC, you muct wear a National Team suit. The rules. And a National team jacket, pants, etc. Used to be all Reusch gloves for the US as they were the only glove company in the US pool.

I think Ligety could have stuck with the red, white and blue theme.
post #9 of 14
So far as I know, there's a whole variety of intersecting things here:

Olympic rules do, indeed, prohibit any sponsor names or logos on clothes or equipment other than the name of the company that markets the particular item it appears on. FIS rules are more lenient, and allow (i) individual racers to have one "helmet" sponsor, whose name, etc. usually appears prominently on helmets, and also on the hats worn in the finish area and interviews and (ii) national associations to have team sponsors (in addition to to equipment companies), whose logos appear up and down the racers' arms and legs. Note that Olympic suits, unlike World Cup ones, don't have "Sprint," "Talk to Chuck" and the like all over them. This has always been the case ("always" in this context meaning "for the last few Olympic cycles anyway"). There are pretty detailed FIS rules about how big equipment-supplier logos can be, where they can appear, how much you can repeat the same ones, etc. The Olympic rules are mostly the same, except for the outright prohibition on non-equipment-supplier advertising.

It was the '72 Olympics, when the IOC was still fighting "shamateurism," when they made racers cover even the equipment suppliers logos. Nowadays, they certainly have accepted that the athletes (some of 'em, anyway) are pros, they just (I guess) don't want the Olympic competitors to start looking like Nascar vehicles. Fair enough. Those who are more prone to sinister theories might mumble something about the IOC and national Olympic associations wanting to make sure they protect their own ability to collect money from their own sponsors by keeping the ads for McDonalds and Coke from getting buried in a bunch of other brand names whose sponsor money is going to individuals and specific sport associations.

Equipment suppliers have deals with the national associations too. They pay some amount just to have the right to have athletes use their equipment, and some pay more to be exclusive suppliers. This is all pretty regimented: for example, the deal when Delta Air Lines or Audi sponsor the US Ski Team (as an organization) is a restriction that prohibits any individual racer from taking on United or BMW as a helmet sponsor. I suspect the Bode-Leki-glove thing someone noticed arises from an exclusive deal with Reusch.

The push for varied suit designs almost certainly comes from Spyder. They're smart enough marketeers to know you can sell more suits if you give your buyers a bunch of "individualized" choices to pick from (all of which have been seen on TV, of course). Originally, they just had special suits for the two overall World Cup winners, but once Bode kept wearing his, despite no longer holding the title, I suppose that particular horse was out of the barn.
post #10 of 14
I actually liked the suit.  My reaction was "cool" and "how come his suit is different colors"?  I know our flag is red white and blue, but frankly I am sick of the colors, I don't see why we can't have snazzy colored speed suits for the team.  Stick a flag on them somewhere if you have to.  There's a number of other countries' suits I like way better and they don't match their flag colors.  

And yeah, I'm a chick...
post #11 of 14
That sounds reasonable, meaning the part about Spyder pushing for varied suit designs, which is not, IMHO, unreasonable.  Let's not forget that Spyder put a *lot* of R&D money into incorporating D30 into the tech suits, and into developing the Oly suits, which are not just eye-catching, but are also reputed to be up to a second faster in a full-length speed event due to the improved aero qualities.  Plus all the gear, not just suits, that Spyder supplies to the US and Canadian teams, among others.  Plus, yes, we are talking about the US Ski Team, but when you go through the start wand, it's still an individual event...



Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post

So far as I know, there's a whole variety of intersecting things here:

Olympic rules do, indeed, prohibit any sponsor names or logos on clothes or equipment other than the name of the company that markets the particular item it appears on. FIS rules are more lenient, and allow (i) individual racers to have one "helmet" sponsor, whose name, etc. usually appears prominently on helmets, and also on the hats worn in the finish area and interviews and (ii) national associations to have team sponsors (in addition to to equipment companies), whose logos appear up and down the racers' arms and legs. Note that Olympic suits, unlike World Cup ones, don't have "Sprint," "Talk to Chuck" and the like all over them. This has always been the case ("always" in this context meaning "for the last few Olympic cycles anyway"). There are pretty detailed FIS rules about how big equipment-supplier logos can be, where they can appear, how much you can repeat the same ones, etc. The Olympic rules are mostly the same, except for the outright prohibition on non-equipment-supplier advertising.

It was the '72 Olympics, when the IOC was still fighting "shamateurism," when they made racers cover even the equipment suppliers logos. Nowadays, they certainly have accepted that the athletes (some of 'em, anyway) are pros, they just (I guess) don't want the Olympic competitors to start looking like Nascar vehicles. Fair enough. Those who are more prone to sinister theories might mumble something about the IOC and national Olympic associations wanting to make sure they protect their own ability to collect money from their own sponsors by keeping the ads for McDonalds and Coke from getting buried in a bunch of other brand names whose sponsor money is going to individuals and specific sport associations.

Equipment suppliers have deals with the national associations too. They pay some amount just to have the right to have athletes use their equipment, and some pay more to be exclusive suppliers. This is all pretty regimented: for example, the deal when Delta Air Lines or Audi sponsor the US Ski Team (as an organization) is a restriction that prohibits any individual racer from taking on United or BMW as a helmet sponsor. I suspect the Bode-Leki-glove thing someone noticed arises from an exclusive deal with Reusch.

The push for varied suit designs almost certainly comes from Spyder. They're smart enough marketeers to know you can sell more suits if you give your buyers a bunch of "individualized" choices to pick from (all of which have been seen on TV, of course). Originally, they just had special suits for the two overall World Cup winners, but once Bode kept wearing his, despite no longer holding the title, I suppose that particular horse was out of the barn.
 
post #12 of 14
Actually, the color choice for Ted is a sly optical illusion, one that tricks the color receptor cones of the eye: stare at the colors on his suit for a minute or two, then stare at a blank, white area.  You should see red, white and blue.

And I think Bode stopped wearing the green Spyder suit very early this season.  My guess is that his team duds didn't get processed in the same order as the rest of the USST, so he may have been wearing the green very early on (and may still wear it in training, to preserve the fabric of the newer suit).  

Lindsey gets über special treatment from Sypder, given she never wears the same DH/SG suit more than one event.  The white/hot pink/magenta suit is pretty much SL/GS these days, but the others (some of which I really like, others that make me scratch my head) are likely in really nice shape (i.e. fabric still mostly new, little stretching, few burn marks from gate hits).
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post

Lindsey gets über special treatment from Sypder, given she never wears the same DH/SG suit more than one event. 

For speed events, noone of, let's say, top 10 races wears suit more then once, and even if Bode is out of top 10 at the moment, I doubt he doesn't get new suit for each race. So I think he doesn't need to "preserve the fabric". Speed suits are much more complicated thing then GS or SL suits, and there's a whole lot of stuff going on behind all that... from production to little tricks which sometimes limit to cheating already ;)
post #14 of 14
Quote:
That sounds reasonable, meaning the part about Spyder pushing for varied suit designs, which is not, IMHO, unreasonable.

Available now from Spyder: eight different Lindsey Vonn suit designs, at $999 per. Whether there's a price break for someone who buys a set of all eight, I don't know.
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