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New to skiing: how long does it take to improve abilities?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
 
Hi all!

I am going skiing for the first time next weekend. I am taking lessons which last for 3 days and it is full day skiing.

I was just wondering, on what level will I be after these lessons? how high can I set my goals to be this season if I ski 3 times per week starting next weekend until the end of the season? 

All my friends are coming in April and my boyfriend is a great skier so I want to be able to go do some runs with him

Thank you
post #2 of 9
 If you set your mind to it and have a decent program you can get good. I had a student a few years ago that decided she was going to ski. She took a lesson once a week with me all season and went from never-ever to pretty darn good able to ski Stowe's hardest marked trails. She told me "I'm going to be a skier" I said "this is what you need to do", and she did it. Just commit and do it. I knew she was committed when she showed up for the second lesson with a pair of new boots from the best bootfitter in town.
post #3 of 9
It all depends on you.  Do you do other physical activities?  Anything counts that is active, and anything that has balance involved helps.  Dance, running, skating, yoga, whatever.   No, poker is not a sport, nor are video games.

Where you born with a generous scoop of athleticism?  Some beginner skiers take off and make great progress.  Others make much slower progress but have just as much fun.

Two things you must get right--stance and balance.  Get an understanding of how you should stand and move, and where you balance should be, and you will have a great time with more fun than frustration.

You will not make runs with your boyfriend.  He will be making runs with you (if he is smart).
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 If you set your mind to it and have a decent program you can get good. I had a student a few years ago that decided she was going to ski. She took a lesson once a week with me all season and went from never-ever to pretty darn good able to ski Stowe's hardest marked trails. She told me "I'm going to be a skier" I said "this is what you need to do", and she did it. Just commit and do it. I knew she was committed when she showed up for the second lesson with a pair of new boots from the best bootfitter in town.

best boot fitter in town under sales Inner boot works quite a bit :).

IMO starting next week and going for a month straight with 3 days a week. If your 21(guess from your screenname) and reasonable athletic and a girl(more willing to accept others ideas IMO).  Id say being able to ski blue runs 100 percent matching and in control. maybe more or less  who knows. Come back and tell us.

I have had a couple 3 days never ever lesson this year and watch everyone of them ski easy blues matching(mostly) by the end. One was a 40 ish year old women who did tons of stuff but wasnt the most athletic person.

It sounds as if you commited already with full days lessons. and commit to days on snow. 

Id also like to echo what Softsnowguy said other activity can help alot.
post #5 of 9
A few thoughts:

- Don't worry too much about how good you get how fast. The main thing is to have fun.

- Good news: if getting better is fun (which it is for most people), you're in good shape. Those of us who've skied for 40+ years are probably not going to get a lot better in the course of day (or maybe not even in the course of week). You'll definitely experience quick and visible improvement, even if it may be obvious you've still got a long way to go.

- A lot depends on your characteristics. Many people get good enough to make their way down fairly difficult runs pretty quickly ... almost certainly with a complete absence of style and grace, and usually not at great speed, but they can do it. Others might be a bit more hesitant about scary runs, but maybe quicker in the "style-and-grace" department.

- Other good news: unless your boyfriend isn't much of a boyfriend (or is unusually impatient), you'll be able to do runs with him. Not every run on the mountain, but enough that you both can have a good time.
post #6 of 9
As a beginner who began Feb 08 - lets say it takes time, a lot of time to do things well, coming down a slope is for the birds, now, coming down with finesse in technique and supreme control that takes a lot of time. The best part of it is though if one really works hard on each dimension - the improvement becomes pretty obvious to one's senses, intimidation at slopes gets supplanted by a relaxed smile, and these come slowly but surely, and therein lies the joy of skiing. Stick with it, and it will come, and this is one sport where the simple unpredictability of natural terrain delivers a lesson almost every time one straps on those twin blades. Soulful.
post #7 of 9
You can definitely do it if you are persistent, go often, and log tons of mileage.


To put this in perspective, I was still wedging 1.5 months ago but now I can do down in all runs at my local hill without putting myself or others in danger. I skied 15-20 times this season, averaging 4 hours/each time. I can ski on one ski (either foot) or go reverse in  green runs; I can do carving GS turns confidently (not quite good at slalom/short turns where a bump might throw me off course). I still fall from time to time but that means I'm still learning:)

If you want to become a good skier ,one advice I can give is to work on your fundamental on easier runs. You might feel like a newbie at the beginning and spend a lot of time at the green/easier blue but once you get the fundamentals down, you can ski gracefully and confidently in any runs.


The fear of steep slope arises from the fear of losing control. Once you can control your speed and direction, then you can do down on any hill.


Have fun on harder runs and practice the basics on easier runs!!!
post #8 of 9
After some thought.
It mostly depends on your balance skills, and what you are exposed to as far as lesson/technique.

It could take you as little as 3 days to be carving parallel down blues, or you could ski for years and never get there.

M guess, is that with good instruction and starting out being able to ride a bicycle, you should be skiing pretty well after a dozen or so days.
post #9 of 9
Athleticism, good equipment (boots and appropriate learning skis), and great instruction will make it faster and it may not take very long before you can get down most of the trails you find. Taking that next leap up to being able to ski the hardest trails with speed, style, and control takes a long time and a lot of mileage.

An athletic friend of mine just started learning to ski 3 seasons ago and has had about 10 ski days a season. This year he was able to ski all of the blue runs at Breckenridge with good mechanics and starting to challenge the easier black terrain. 

If you can, join a race program. 
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