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New B to skiing and I am hooked and due to this my feet are not happy..Need good boots

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone and thank you for taking the time to read this.  Im a new to skking and man do i love it..Only problem is my feet cant take the current boots that i have which were hand me downs but are fairly new.(3years) 

Ok, so now for my question.  I am looking to get a new pair of boots problem is I have a wide foot.  I would like to know what is the most comfortable boot that i could possiabilty buy.  Looking to spend a max of $400 but if there is a pair that is absolutely above the rest than I consider them.  

Any help is good help.
                              Thank You,
                                        MrJoeB
post #2 of 8
JB,

I think what you need to do to get a good experience with any boot is to budget for a good $60 or so for bootfitting.

I got my Tecknica's online for around $450. But they did not become the most comfy boot of my life until I had a ski shop widen the shell at the balls of my toes to increase the width. Got them off Amazon. So the shop charged me around $30, with a free second tune when the first tune was not wide enough. A good shop will not ruin your new boots. They will be glad to widen it incrementally.

Just don't let them schmooze you into buying an elite class demo skis from them too quick in 2010 or 2011.

If you do, if you go back to pay homage to said previous bootfitting joy and trust, then you may have to learn about how to properly throw a few more upmteen twenty dollar bills at them, which you could have spent on a brand new pair of skis.

Do I have a story to tell?

You tell me.

Get the Technica's. But plan to Spend or dicker in the extra $50 to get them fitted to YOU. It is very unlikely any quality made factory boot will fit your feet to a tee.

But at the same time if you go with Technica's, the bootfitter will know precisely how to work that shell based on your intitial discomfort input. You will then arrive at Nirvana or Xanadu or one of those places.
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJoeB824 View Post

Hello everyone and thank you for taking the time to read this.  Im a new to skking and man do i love it..Only problem is my feet cant take the current boots that i have which were hand me downs but are fairly new.(3years) 

Ok, so now for my question.  I am looking to get a new pair of boots problem is I have a wide foot.  I would like to know what is the most comfortable boot that i could possiabilty buy.  Looking to spend a max of $400 but if there is a pair that is absolutely above the rest than I consider them.  

Any help is good help.
                              Thank You,
                                        MrJoeB

400 bucks wont get you alot unless you have exact  dimensions of your foot and know a boot that can work out of the box and you can find it cheap.

IN all honest be willing to spend more and your foot pain will go away. A REALLY good boot fitter can make any foot pain go away. Also dont listen to pole plant in this post or any post of his.
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 Also dont listen to pole plant in this post or any post of his.

Hmmm, I thought his was a pretty good take. I have a standard D width foot in shoes and I have found Tecnica's fit my width out of the box about perfect. Assuming you have an E width, it will take some widening by a boot tech to make them right. Qwik story:
My sister wanted new stiffer boots, so I asked her if the present brand she uses feels good, yes was the reply. I found her some $700 boots online for $200 and it cost her $70 to get them dialed in prefect. Sure the boot fitter dood told her never to buy boots online while she was there, but she didn't pay $700 for the boots either. Maybe the first time you will need to pay a bunch to get into the right boot, but after that, do what I do
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJoeB824 View Post

Hello everyone and thank you for taking the time to read this.  Im a new to skking and man do i love it..Only problem is my feet cant take the current boots that i have which were hand me downs but are fairly new.(3years) 

Ok, so now for my question.  I am looking to get a new pair of boots problem is I have a wide foot.  I would like to know what is the most comfortable boot that i could possiabilty buy.  Looking to spend a max of $400 but if there is a pair that is absolutely above the rest than I consider them.  

Any help is good help.
                              Thank You,
                                        MrJoeB

Much of comfort really comes from a boot after it's broken-in to your foot.  It takes time.  Best to start with a new boot for your own foot.
The other factor is conditioning.   You will cry less the more you use them.  Sure it needs to "fit", but be patient with boots.  You should be able to find a boot for $400.00 range that will be OK.  If your not racing, go for a little looser fit.  Some boot fitters think we are all racing!  Best to you.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by PolePlant View Post

JB,

I think what you need to do to get a good experience with any boot is to budget for a good $60 or so for bootfitting.

I got my Tecknica's online for around $450. But they did not become the most comfy boot of my life until I had a ski shop widen the shell at the balls of my toes to increase the width. Got them off Amazon. So the shop charged me around $30, with a free second tune when the first tune was not wide enough. A good shop will not ruin your new boots. They will be glad to widen it incrementally.

Just don't let them schmooze you into buying an elite class demo skis from them too quick in 2010 or 2011.

If you do, if you go back to pay homage to said previous bootfitting joy and trust, then you may have to learn about how to properly throw a few more upmteen twenty dollar bills at them, which you could have spent on a brand new pair of skis.

Do I have a story to tell?

You tell me.

Get the Technica's. But plan to Spend or dicker in the extra $50 to get them fitted to YOU. It is very unlikely any quality made factory boot will fit your feet to a tee.

But at the same time if you go with Technica's, the bootfitter will know precisely how to work that shell based on your intitial discomfort input. You will then arrive at Nirvana or Xanadu or one of those places.

Why are you giving people advice?

People like you are the reason so many beginners get confused & discouraged.


live2ski's situation is fine if you have the knowledge and experience; if your a beginner, it's the Internet mistake of a lifetime.

Go to a fitter (more then one), try on many pairs, you WILL find a pair that fit good & are in your budget. Be upfront and honest with them on your budget & they'll hook you up.
post #7 of 8
Just to confirm that PolePlant offers truly epic-bad information. What is it with the late 09-early 10 newbies? Compellingly dumb.

Anyway, it's near the end of the season - go to some local shops and see what they have available for YOUR foot ("Get the Technica's )

I have a wide forefoot and a skinny calf, and only so many boots fit (in my case a Lange was best). Your situation is different (flex, size, fit etc), and you need a boot that fits your foot, not what some interweb nitwit says he bought on line.

The other benefit of buying locally is that the adjustments that need to be made (and they'll be some) are usually included in the price, even on sale.
post #8 of 8
I don't know where you live but you need to find a good boot fitter.  First, you may be able to pay for a fitter to work on your existing boots, they may not be as bad as you think.  Second, if the boots are not fixable then you may need to scrap them and start from scratch and I must be honest, $400 is a slim budget considering custom foot-beds are around $100 all by themselves.  If you give your location, you may get some recommendations on a fitter.  Me, I live in Chicago and the best fitter I've ever been to is Viking Ski Shop.  When you buy boots, they do all the work free of charge, with the exception of custom beds.  Further, you can bring them back at any time for free tweaks.  Now that's customer service.  Good Luck and don't get discouraged, the fix is out there, you just need to find it. 
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