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Why is skiing on fresh snow more difficult?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hello Bears. Just got back from skiing at Vail and Beaver Creek last week and have a question. To introduce I am 27 6'2 190lbs. My skis are new (2006) 181cm Volkl Unlimited AC20's which I bought this year and I ski mostly blues and tried my first black diamond runs on the vacation which was a goal of mine. I skied on both packed snow and a thin tracked powder. The snow came down on my 3rd day and I didn't have 100% energy left. Not sure if that could be the reason, but I want to know what it is I'm doing wrong so I can improve.

It was weird because I felt more comfortable on the packed snow more than I did after it snowed 6 or 7 inches. After the snow fell, it was tracked so some was flat and some was fluffy, so I felt like I couldn't get a good feel for how to approach it because I felt I couldn't turn on the edges of the skis. After I skied a run in a bowl I felt exhausted. I tried to ski like I did on groomed slopes, but kept losing balance. I really had to lower my stance and put a lot of pressure on my outside ski to stay up. The skis were controlling me, it felt like they were pulling me down hill. I couldn't stay in control. It was like my ski was getting slowed down or couldn't cut into the snow or something. Shouldn't it be easier when there is some fresh snow?

tracked snow.jpg
post #2 of 28

Being tired on the 3rd day may have added to it but the groomed runs are definitely less tiring. Also, you were probably intimidated by the variable conditions and may have been edging harder than usual. On the front side runs, fresh snow gets skied off by the afternoon and you get crud, moguls, chop, and other words from the skiers vocabulary. This happens east coast or west. Thats why its best to get first tracks on those days after a fresh snow. Those conditions definitely give you more of a workout.

The issues you had skiing in a bowl could be that you are not used to powder. I live in the east coast and even on our "powder" days we still can feel the bottom. It is a very unusual feeling when you can't feel a bottom. In those bowls I get that floating feeling even on the windblown powder. I heard someone describe it as 3-d skiing. I've been skiing for almost 20 years and it still feels weird to me. But, I don't get to ski bowls as much as I like. By the same token people who ski out west may not have as much experience skiing on ice. I've gotten used to it and I'm not afraid of it. I'm confident that my edges will hold. 

I'm not the right guy to tell you how to ski bowls but I can tell you how to smoke them!



Anyway, keeps skiing!

What bowls did you ski and was it windblown or was is deep stuff?

Johnny
 

post #3 of 28
 Lots of reasons for this.  

When you're "in" the snow, not "on" it you need to be less outside ski dominant and more skiing on a platform of both skis.  The snow can get between the skis and make them come apart very easily using one-footed groomed technique.

The ability to pivot/twist the ski is very different in the snow then on it as well, everything has to be done more subtly.

For me a big breakthrough in powder, particularly chopped up powder, is to use a slight almost hop at the turn transition.  Unweighting, up-move (a dirty word in PSIA and on groomed terrain), flexing the legs.  Different ways to describe the need to reduce the downward pressure onto the snow that works so well on the groomed.

Just keep doing it, it will come!
post #4 of 28
To add to what SMJ said: skiing in 3d snow requires a little patients, you can't steer the ski the same way you can on firm snow. You may have a bit of pivot / steering going on in your technique, the soft snow is fighting against that. As you get more opportunities to ski soft snow the best thing to do is ski some slightly 'lower angle' slopes, point the skis into the fall line and tip them on edge equally, pressure the skis and let the ski turn you, not you pivoting the ski. Let it happen, it's natural to fight the acceleration you feel at first but you will quickly see that the skis WILL turn and you will be in control, just relax.
post #5 of 28
Whiteroom and SMJ, what is the best technique for skiing the windblown powder when you are on top but it is still soft so you can't load the outside ski?

I skied China bowl and blue sky basin at Vail last year and I was on top but it was so soft it still had that floating feeling. I was told to totally unweigh the inside ski (almost pick it up) and I was able to feel pressure with the outside ski.  Although I have also been told to to ski more two footed.

Those bowls were like a another world of skiing.
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info. It was not very deep, it wasn't like skiing in knee deep powder. It was not really powder at that point, it was more like piled up snow with shaved parts scattered around as a result of being tracked for a while. I could feel the bottom but at times felt the bottom wasn't packed. It wasn't knee deep, and it was in the Sun Up Bowl.

In these variable conditions it is better to keep the skis closer together? I usually initiate a turn with my skis a little less shoulder width apart and put all of my weight on the outside ski, so that I can lift my inside ski while turning.

IMG_1325.JPG
post #7 of 28
Mike, my plan was to take a private lesson in skiing those back bowls.

Thats the beauty of skiing - you can always find new challenges.
post #8 of 28


I can't really say it much better than that. The key to variable snow is standing on the skis with authority, but staying loose and limber so the ski can track the ground without bouncing you around.
post #9 of 28
 In the piles of chop you describe (which I just came out of at Vail - totally feeling the bottom, but tons of snow all over the place) you still want to use your skis more as a unit then the one footed skiing that works better on groomers.

The more you unweight just one ski, the greater the risk of it being deflected.
post #10 of 28
 Whiteroom, I LOVE the Bruce Lee clip and yes it does say a lot about skiing.

I do want to put a disclaimer in here.  I am not a great powder skier, I am an Eastern skier developing my western skills.  There are many here who ski that stuff much better then I do.

I am sharing with you what I have been taught and what I am learning and what has helped me immensely in making that adjustment.
post #11 of 28
          In variable conditions, I would make sure that my skis are closer together compared to when I am skiing fast carves on groomed runs. The reason for that is I want both skis to be encountering the same resistance as much as possible. You do not want to be hitting a pile of snow with one ski and a patch of ice with the other. In fact, the orientation of both skis have to be identical; i.e. if they are edged, both have to be edged at the same time to the same degree; if one is flat, the other is flat as well. If not, the skis WILL cross.  This is easier to accomplish for me if the legs are closer together. I keep twisting to a minimum and as a last second defensive maneuver.

          The other reason to keep the legs closer together is so that you can ski "two footed." Instead of lifting the other ski, you should lighten it instead. Twisting one ski while lifting the other should only be an infrequent occurence. Weight shift between the inside and outside skis should be subtle.

          As in every other endeavor, the mental aspect will be of paramount importance. Ski with assertion. Make offensive pole plants. Keep centered or a bit forward. Stay out of the backseat. And as always, experience is the best teacher. Keep skiing.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnysdg View Post

Whiteroom and SMJ, what is the best technique for skiing the windblown powder when you are on top but it is still soft so you can't load the outside ski?

I skied China bowl and blue sky basin at Vail last year and I was on top but it was so soft it still had that floating feeling. I was told to totally unweigh the inside ski (almost pick it up) and I was able to feel pressure with the outside ski.  Although I have also been told to to ski more two footed.

Those bowls were like a another world of skiing.
 

first solution get bigger(longer wider) and/or rockered skis then ski how you want or ski more two footed. or do as I do which is both.

also FYI technique is such a broad term, what was happening good in your skiing? what was happening bad?
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post

Hello Bears. Just got back from skiing at Vail and Beaver Creek last week and have a question. To introduce I am 27 6'2 190lbs. My skis are new (2006) 181cm Volkl Unlimited AC20's which I bought this year and I ski mostly blues and tried my first black diamond runs on the vacation which was a goal of mine. I skied on both packed snow and a thin tracked powder. The snow came down on my 3rd day and I didn't have 100% energy left. Not sure if that could be the reason, but I want to know what it is I'm doing wrong so I can improve.

It was weird because I felt more comfortable on the packed snow more than I did after it snowed 6 or 7 inches. After the snow fell, it was tracked so some was flat and some was fluffy, so I felt like I couldn't get a good feel for how to approach it because I felt I couldn't turn on the edges of the skis. After I skied a run in a bowl I felt exhausted. I tried to ski like I did on groomed slopes, but kept losing balance. I really had to lower my stance and put a lot of pressure on my outside ski to stay up. The skis were controlling me, it felt like they were pulling me down hill. I couldn't stay in control. It was like my ski was getting slowed down or couldn't cut into the snow or something. Shouldn't it be easier when there is some fresh snow?

tracked snow.jpg

post some video of you skiing anything and I am sure I can help you ski powder better.
post #14 of 28

Thanks Bushwacker.

Those back bowls were something I've never experienced before. It was pretty awesome.

According to a thread on here, I would need a fat ski of at least 135 mm waist to float me. (based in my size - 6'2" 260 lbs)

Do you think there is truth to that?

I've never tried reverse camber, do they really make powder seem like groomed?

Johnny

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnysdg View Post

Thanks Bushwacker.

Those back bowls were something I've never experienced before. It was pretty awesome.

According to a thread on here, I would need a fat ski of at least 135 mm waist to float me. (based in my size - 6'2" 260 lbs)

Do you think there is truth to that?

I've never tried reverse camber, do they really make powder seem like groomed?

Johnny


yeah I would say 6'2 260lb would need a large ski but I dont think you need a 135mm waist to make it easier. the waist width thread and post I wish would go away. The math isnt solid as it doesnt take into account variable speeds and different flex patterns.

basically with powder skis more is always better except your sacraficing edge quickness for float. and in some rare instances like todays super dense snow(in vermont) too much float is actually a bad thing. My thugs were simply to fast...never thought I d say that, really easy to turn but to fast, my shorter gotama are much easier to ski today

Reverse camber just makes the ski easier to float and more turny when you need it. I would recommend trying a ski 100-110 underfoot about 185-190 in length with some sort of rocker/reverse camber. You cant buy a turn, but you can come pretty close in powder. 
post #16 of 28
However, you don't NEED fat skis to ski powder.  I've skied with plenty of people on skis in the 70's underfoot who ski powder great.  They don't have the float for sure, but with good technique you can ski powder on a race ski 65 underfoot.

Not that BWPA isn't right that they're great in powder, but the skier is more important then the skis.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

However, you don't NEED fat skis to ski powder.  I've skied with plenty of people on skis in the 70's underfoot who ski powder great.  They don't have the float for sure, but with good technique you can ski powder on a race ski 65 underfoot.

Not that BWPA isn't right that they're great in powder, but the skier is more important then the skis.

 

the skier is much more important I agree.

but skiing a 65mm - 70mm skis in powder is like trying to race GS gates on a pontoon. and a great skier isnt that great at either.

I ski a 100+ days a year, and I cant ski a 65mm ski in powder I can barely ski a 71mm ski in fact I blame the narrow waist on my recently broken nose. Skis sunk as I drove the fronts of my boots and double eject....never would have happened on anything else in my quiver....I am not great at skiing but if I cant do it what makes you think some who skis alot fewer days than me can.

If your serious about getting better in powder getting fatter skis is the way to go, if you were serious about running gates you wouldnt recommend people to go try to run them on their fat twins would you? didnt think so.....
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

However, you don't NEED fat skis to ski powder.  I've skied with plenty of people on skis in the 70's underfoot who ski powder great.  They don't have the float for sure, but with good technique you can ski powder on a race ski 65 underfoot.

Not that BWPA isn't right that they're great in powder, but the skier is more important then the skis.


 

Of Course, people have been skiing powder long before shaped, fat, reverse camber or sidecut, etc. But why makes thing difficult for yourself.



Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




yeah I would say 6'2 260lb would need a large ski but I dont think you need a 135mm waist to make it easier. the waist width thread and post I wish would go away. The math isnt solid as it doesnt take into account variable speeds and different flex patterns.

basically with powder skis more is always better except your sacraficing edge quickness for float. and in some rare instances like todays super dense snow(in vermont) too much float is actually a bad thing. My thugs were simply to fast...never thought I d say that, really easy to turn but to fast, my shorter gotama are much easier to ski today

Reverse camber just makes the ski easier to float and more turny when you need it. I would recommend trying a ski 100-110 underfoot about 185-190 in length with some sort of rocker/reverse camber. You cant buy a turn, but you can come pretty close in powder. 


 


Last year I skied blue sky basin with the new stockli scott schmidts with the 101 waist and it was great. I skied china bowl in stockli xxl and hated it.
 

I know what you mean about heavy east coast snow. I think thats why we refer to it as "boot deep" or "10 inches of fresh". I skied wednesday at hunter after fresh snow with my scott schmidts (the originals with the 89 waist) and they were too bomber. I had 2 choices - bomb it or cheat the radius. I chose the former early on but as the day went on and the snow got skied off I chose to cheat the radius. That was quite a workout on the stiff schmidts. I actually think the 101 schmidts I demoed in Vail were easier to cheat the radius.

post #19 of 28
I agree BWPA, but I  think your analogy to skiing gates in pontoons is a bit of an exaggeration.

One of the best skiers I know skis GS race skis in deep powder.

But as you say it's a lot harder to do, so I do agree that recommending narrow skis for powder is not a good idea.

Just saying that it's not necessary.  I skied in some pretty deep cutup snow on my Progressor 8+'s this week, and I don't ski that kind of stuff great, but I skied it pretty well.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

I agree BWPA, but I  think your analogy to skiing gates in pontoons is a bit of an exaggeration.

One of the best skiers I know skis GS race skis in deep powder.

But as you say it's a lot harder to do, so I do agree that recommending narrow skis for powder is not a good idea.

Just saying that it's not necessary.  I skied in some pretty deep cutup snow on my Progressor 8+'s this week, and I don't ski that kind of stuff great, but I skied it pretty well.


Not an exaggeration after you get use to how dynamic of turns you can make in bottomless snow going back to a pair of GS race skis feels just as bad as skiing pontoons in a GS course.
I am also thinking your idea of deep powder and mine are two different things as well what your take of good skiing in deep powder is.

even if you were right that the guys does pretty well on GS skis in deep powder the old coot that does would be much faster and be able to ski tighter lines on proper skis.

I dont get while PSIA people are so against wider skis wider skis not only open sideways skiing to people they also open using a slower line faster than at the same time than SL skis.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnysdg View Post




Of Course, people have been skiing powder long before shaped, fat, reverse camber or sidecut, etc. But why makes thing difficult for yourself.




Last year I skied blue sky basin with the new stockli scott schmidts with the 101 waist and it was great. I skied china bowl in stockli xxl and hated it.
 

I know what you mean about heavy east coast snow. I think thats why we refer to it as "boot deep" or "10 inches of fresh". I skied wednesday at hunter after fresh snow with my scott schmidts (the originals with the 89 waist) and they were too bomber. I had 2 choices - bomb it or cheat the radius. I chose the former early on but as the day went on and the snow got skied off I chose to cheat the radius. That was quite a workout on the stiff schmidts. I actually think the 101 schmidts I demoed in Vail were easier to cheat the radius.


cheat the radius? explain
post #22 of 28
BWPA, I was sking GS turns with the schmidts early on in my day. That is why I got the schmidts in the first place to blast thru fresh snow piles, crud, chop, etc. And they are awesome at that.

However, later in the day the runs were real skied off and you had bumps and ice the conditions turned to crap pretty fast. You know what I mean being an east coast skier. GS turns were getting hairy on the steeper stuff so I was making shorter turns to ski a better line thru the bumps and ice. The schmids are a 26+ radius and I'm making turns much shorter than that so that is what I mean by cheating the radius. With the SS that is a whole lot of work because of the radius, the stiffness of those skis, and the fact that they are way more work when you ski them too slow.
 
And too slow for the schmidts is really not that slow. They like to be skied fast.
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks I'll try out these moves next week in Lake Tahoe!!!


Johnny I also was considering lessons at Vail last week. I didn't want to split from my friends though. How do you convince your friends who don't want to do harder runs to try? They are scared of speed.
post #24 of 28

Mike, you don't. Even if you do they will ski slow and be a waste of time.


Tell them to meet you at a certain place at a certain time.

It is an individual sport.

post #25 of 28
 I can relate to problems skiing powder.  However, my problem wasn't Mike's knee-deep fresh snow.  I like that stuff.  I used to live in Carlsbad, NM, with an eye on the weather channel, skis, boots, polls, tire chains, and center-lock differential all at the ready.  Ski Apache was only two hours away and for a Southwestern but high-altitude area it got some snow.  Yes, one winter seemed more like summer, skiing from snow patch to snow patch, but in a good winter you'd think you were at the North Pole, if the Pole had trees.  Anyway, I got up there and tackled Apache Bowl once in a blizzard, and twice after a blizzard, in light snowfall.  But each time it was DEEP POWDER and I was a blue-run intermediate skier.  The first time I tackled the bowl I learned that powder is different.  Like, where did my skis go?  I guess they're under there somewhere,  I learned that turning is different.  Each turn resulted in a violent face plant and goggles full of snow.  At some point, I don't know whether it was during the blizzard or during my last ill-fated trip I got a glimpse of the pleasures of powder.  I couldn't feel the bottom; I felt like I was doing a combination of floating and flying.  I managed a few turns without face plants.  However, on my last attempt at the bowl, it was my last run of the day (Isn't it always that one that causes trouble?).   I had a choice: the easy and quite scenic "game trail" or going off piste down through the bowl.  You're never going to learn to ski powder if you don't try, I told myself.  Good advice, but not for the last run: Take my advice, for that one choose a nice, easy glider.  Anyway, I chose the bowl.  My previous trips had given me some amount of confidence and I picked up speed, and linked some turns past boulders and through trees.  Then, at a higher speed than I'd ever achieved in powder I suffered an extremely violent face plant.  Is this really worth it? I asked myself as I pulled my face and snow-filled, broken goggles out of the snow.  I looked around for my skis and saw nothing but snow.  Then I saw what might have been a ski tip behind me.  I reached for it with my left hand.  All of a sudden an incredible searing pain traveled through my hand and up my arm.  I was in trouble.  The lifts were about to shut down and here I was with what turned out to be a broken hand, off of any trail, in between a bunch of rocks and trees.  And it was snowing moderately.  For a moment I contemplated the prospect of spending the night buried in snow at some 11,000 feet of altitude.  That not being an attractive option, I managed to find a pole and began waving madly at people on a distant lift, my only chance for rescue unless a ski patroller happened to cross my section of the bowl on a last-minute sweep. Somehow I got all my equipment together and hoped for the best.  I was relived when a couple of guys skied by and said they'd inform the people at the bottom of the lift. Then they skied off.  I was doubly relived when some good Samaritan skied by and said he'd stick around until somebody showed up to get me off that mountain.  we heard a snowmobile approaching from below and we thought resucue was moments away.  Then we heard the sound of the engine retreating.  The same thing happened with a snowmobile trying to approach from above. Finally, a ski patrol guy, to whom I'll be forever grateful, though I didn't get his name, skied down with a toboggan.  He got on his radio and informed somebody that I was too injured to help myself (actually, I think he said I was a lost cause or something to that effect) and he would need help.  Some guy who appeared to me to be a member of the Mescalero Apache tribe that owned the place skied down and helped me onto the tobaggan, after the patrol guy put my arm in a splint.  Soon the ski patroller was pulling me down the bowl, down upper deep freeze, then lower deep freeze, then a run in front of the lodge where everybody took note of the latest casualty.  I was taken to a clinic that I never knew existed, and was put in a room with the rest of the day's casualties.  Soon it was determined that I could drive, though I had standard shift, since my right hand and arm were ok.  (But my guitar playing was forever compromised due to the injury to my left hand.}  Needless to say, I became interested in what the secret was for skiing powder. I got to a hospital where I was X-rayed, told I had probable fracture, got ace-bandaged up and told to see an orthopedist back in Carlsbad.  The nurse practitioner (I didn't get a doctor) gave me some pain meds, complete with child-safety cap.  After trying multiple ways to open the bottle with my broken hand back at the Smokey Bear Motel in Capitan, I got a hammer out of my tool kit and smashed the bottle to bits on the sidewalk.. I was tired of being in pain.  Anyway   back to powder skiing: I think the true answer is that the skills needed to ski powder are subtle and beyond words.  You just have to ski it long enough, like somebody said.  I heard one guy say that all of sudden one day he was able to ski powder. The ability just descended upon him like a gift from Heaven.  Of course, I learned about putting equal weight on both skis, sort of making both skis your downhill ski.  I also got an Olympic gold medalist to tell me my suspicion that keeping your weight just a tiny bit back might be right--but not to tell anybody that I heard it from her.  Unfortunately, I moved to Louisiana shortly after learning the powder secrets so I don't know if they work.  One thing I do know: I almost rented some wide powder skis the day I broke my hand.  I didn't.  That was a mistake.  The rental guy actually talked me out of it.  He said he had one pair and nobody ever rented them (of course not, the locals knew how to ski powder and the tourists didn't know to ask for them).  The next time I try powder I'm taking my newfound knowledge, wide skis, and possibly a private instructor (as somebody here  suggested) with me.  I did have a private instructor once whom I asked about going to the bowl.  He talked me out of it.  I guess he felt I wasn't ready.  So I takled it alone.  Brilliant.
post #26 of 28
I feel your pain regarding skiing deeper snow...
I am around your size 5'10"...240lbs...
I am just fine on the groomed, but struggled like mad when it got deeper than boot top, crud, windblown...
I have a conventional pair of fat skis, Movement Goliath Sluffs...184cm..99mm under foot...and even these were work...in those conditions...
I found a rental shop that had a pair of K2 Obsethed's...179cm length...105mm under foot...rocker tip and tail...
I was skeptical that these would be that much better than my own fat skis...WRONG.....
I went skiing yesterday even though they were basically the same length and only 6 mm wider, the K2's were WAY..WAY...easier to ski in wind blown, crud and ungroomed conditions...
I went down runs on the mountain with much more ease than ever before, previously I would been in the back seat tail gunning all the way down fighting to keep my balance and not crash...
With the K2's..dramatic difference...i still had to keep focus and ski them, but in a whole different category in the ease of use....
The shop had a pair of Hellbents, but i though it would be better if i started out on the rockered ski experiment with something close to the size of my Sluffs...
I never had a problem with the ski tips sinking in or anything like that...
I cant imagine how much fun a little bit bigger pair would be, if that would make a difference or not...
I look forward to getting more time on the Obsethed's...it can only get better as the confidence grows...
I am now a convert to the new Resort Rocker ski technology...
Even though I had them for only one day, the difference was huge...
I know a lot of the old school would say ...take lessons...but sometimes I just want to have fun, and if the fatter rockered ski allows me to do that...and enjoy my time on the mountain...i am there...
Hmmm...know anyone who wants to buy a pair of Sluffs...
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jellybean View Post

          [...]
          As in every other endeavor, the mental aspect will be of paramount importance. Ski with assertion. [...]

 

This cannot be stressed enough. If the confidence isn't there, the effort will be weak at best > troubles > more confidence drain.

That's what happened to me yesterday.


You also told advised the OP to "stay out of the backseat". What does it mean?
Backseat re: the body stence (like a seating position)?
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg19_82 View Post
 I skied on both packed snow and a thin tracked powder. The snow came down on my 3rd day and I didn't have 100% energy left. Not sure if that could be the reason, but I want to know what it is I'm doing wrong so I can improve.

It was weird because I felt more comfortable on the packed snow more than I did after it snowed 6 or 7 inches. After the snow fell, it was tracked so some was flat and some was fluffy, so I felt like I couldn't get a good feel for how to approach it because I felt I couldn't turn on the edges of the skis.
After I skied a run in a bowl I felt exhausted. I tried to ski like I did on groomed slopes, but kept losing balance. I really had to lower my stance and put a lot of pressure on my outside ski to stay up. The skis were controlling me, it felt like they were pulling me down hill. I couldn't stay in control. It was like my ski was getting slowed down or couldn't cut into the snow or something. Shouldn't it be easier when there is some fresh snow?
Mike
Don;t think of this as doing something 'wrong'. Its more a matter of education and progression.
Skiing snow with depth, especially snow of inconsistent texture, depth or consistency is what comes with time, experience and 'feel'.
You've gotten some good tips and some suggestions on equipment. And certainly optimizing equipment for the snow helps a bunch. But people have skied powder and snow deeper than groomer  inch or 2 for - over 100 yrs (for sure, maybe longer). On equipment muchmore rudimentary than what we have these days.
So I'll address it from the 'doing' side.
First, there is a basic difference between smooth groomers with some soft cover and snow with some depth. You noted 'turning on edges'. Edges are almost insignificant when skiing IN snow. In fact 'edging'actually causes more issues than it solves.
In snow with depth, you are actually skiing the whole ski plane, not just the edge. When skiing the entire plan, the ski becomes more reactive. By trying to 'edge', you are overworking the ski.
So, more subtle movement from edge to edge is important.
The "skis controlling you", "losing balance" and "feeling exhausted" are all results of you trying to muscle the skis into turning.
In snow of depth you have 2 equally important platforms, each ski. On groomers and hard snow one can almost ignore the 'uphill ski'. Not so in snow of depth. You have to develop a feel for the proper balance or pressure/weight on each ski.
Fore/aft balance is just as critical. Again, all balance issues are rewarded thru subtle understanding/feel and changes as you move from one turn and position to the next.
All this is a matter of time and learning (that learning is your self-learning and developing of 'feel' for the snow).
SO
Feel comes over time and understanding of what needs to happen.
I suggest, to improve, on the next opportunity to ski some snow of depth; you pick a trail that is not too steep, maybe something blue. Work for developing the feel for the effect of moving your weight/pressure for fore to aft. Eventually you'll find that 'centered' feel where the skis just move predictably under you. Also work on developing feel for the weight/pressure for each ski during the turn progression. We can talk about 60/40 or 55/45 or 65/35; but that all doesn;t mean a thing. This is purely a 'sense' thing which you'll get as you do it. There'll be that magic point when all of a sudden, it just feels right and everything works. Then you'll struggle to get that feeling back.
Relax, don;t over edge. Relax is a key operative. When it gets frustrating, take a quick breather. Look around, marvel at the winter, feel good. Try again
Pick an easy, open trail, start with ligh almost imperceptible 'edge' changes, light rolls from one side to the next. Very shallow, very wide radius turns at more than slow speeds. Speeds which are comfortable but much faster than you;d do on a steeper slope. Get the feel for gentle turns.
Try not to traverse. Try to move smoothly from one turn into the next. Better to make shallow linked turns rather than sharper turns with traverses in between.
Then slowly, as you 'feel' it all is nicely working, tip over more in each turn and increase the amount of turn and quickness from turn to turn.
Feel and find the fore/aft balance point for your skis.
This could take a whole day of 'practice' to even start feeling this. And it could much longer to really get the feel.
Skiing snow of depth is truly the complete package, the zen of everything you do well and not so well.
Watch others who move effortlessly thru the environment. There's much to be learned from the seeing. Try to determine what it is that allows them to do it effortlessly. Quiet upperbody? Hands comfortably in front? Shoulders, head and chest facing down the fall-line? what else?
It usually doesn't come like a light switch. It comes first in 3 or 4 incredible, fun turns. Then maybe 1/2 a run.
When it happens on a run, don;t be afraid to go back and do the same thing again, and again. Repetition works wonders.
Skiing, like all things worth doing, is about learning.
If you approach each run, each turn with the mentality of a student, you'll feel the thrill of each new thing.
I've been lucky to have 45 yrs to learn skiing, and every day I go out I learn something new.
Its a school I hope never to graduate from.
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