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Yet another "reference" video from ESA02

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 27
Was it hard to make those turns? [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #3 of 27
Such nice turns. Another coach, I take it?
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by ssh:
Such nice turns. Another coach, I take it?
Yup
post #5 of 27
oh that smooth silky silvery water flows right down the hill uninterrupted by changes in pitch, terrain, snow condition or scenery. what a kick to watch, and a greater pleasure to learn from.

the real great thing was watching him cut it loose a few times during ESAII. wow.

nice turns, Weems.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by cgeib:
Was it hard to make those turns? [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
Yeah, I know. Hard to do? No. Hard to watch? Yes!

Next year I'll do those on my edges. One of the interesting challenges I have in my skiing is that I often trade explosive power for fluidity. The skiing looks nice, but lacks kick! That's why in races, when I would go through the finish gate, I'd look at the timer hopefully, and he look back and say, "Smooth." (meaning slow again) Oh well.
post #7 of 27
Ya know I was just razzing! I have no grounds to be a critic anyway!

Great turns!

I don't know about that "slow again" thing ...I followed ya several times Thurs. and didn't notice any difficulty with acceleration!
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
nice turns, Weems.
Oh, man, I should have guessed! I would have been right!!! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

weems, isn't it interesting that there is always room for improvement? And, I think, we can be our own worst critics. That said, if you had a smile on your face, it really doesn't get much better than that, does it? Nice snow, great people, and that flow down hill... :
post #9 of 27
Actually, I am my fifth worst critic. I have four sons!

And Chris, I knew the game. But realize, you've never seen me in a race course. It's an exercise in slow motion. It's like I ski with a refrigerator in tow.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:
Actually, I am my fifth worst critic. I have four sons!
Uh-huh... And they learned that WHERE?! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #11 of 27
Ah, yes- the better you are, the more nitpicking they become. I suspect that my residents complain about me the same way in the OR.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by ssh:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by weems:
Actually, I am my fifth worst critic. I have four sons!
Uh-huh... And they learned that WHERE?! [img]tongue.gif[/img] </font>[/quote]Well, from their mothers, of course!
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by dp:
Ah, yes- the better you are, the more nitpicking they become. I suspect that my residents complain about me the same way in the OR.
hah! doubt it.
post #14 of 27
Super nice and fluid turns! I like your smooth incorporation of different radius turns in a single run. Also it looks like there are some off camber spots in the terrain, and I especially like your fluidity in adapting to the changing fall line.

In this regard I do have a question. Early in the video clip, you made a transition from medium radius turns to a number of rather rapid small radius turns and then back to larger radius turns again. It is hard to distinguish terrain features (e.g. pitch) from the clip. Did you alter the radius in response to pitch changes? Were the more rapid smaller radius turns done in a steeper portion of the run?
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Josseph,

FYI it's not a "single" run. the clip is 3 seperate sections pieced together.

DC
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by dchan:
FYI it's not a "single" run. the clip is 3 seperate sections pieced together.
DC
Thanks, Dchan. I am particularly referring to the first segment in the clip, where Weems played with the turn radius from medium to smaller and then back larger again.
post #17 of 27
Seriously good, relaxed skiing. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

Since everyone agrees, I hope you don't mind if I have some fun and be the [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img] one!!!

Why the big leap on turn one?

It's hard to tell on the video: Can you tell me why at about the 39/40 second mark, the uphill ski lifts? It looks like it's on it's tail for just an instant. Is that terrain or did you get a bit back? :

Did the terrain really warrant loosing contact with the snow that often? :

When all else fails, remember JABOTIC ( just a bit of tongue in cheek )

Seriously good pole use. Everytime planted at the top of an isoceles triangle with base between ski tip and toe piece, the other two sides equal length. Of special note is the last run, where the poles also get planted in a straight line right down the line of motion. Very very nice. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img] [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #18 of 27
I probably went to short turns out of total fear. Or else, I wanted to show the group how to vary the radius.

As for the inside ski lift--I didn't see it on the video, because the version I have is really small. However, I do that often on my left side as my left leg is often really lazy/late into the turn.

In the last section there are some air spots. Sometimes, when I'm late releasing, I'll shoot the ski forward through the edge change. Otherwise it seems to get trapped on the edge and bogs down through the transition. It seems to happen on steep terrain when I hold the edge pressure too long for extra slowdown. I believe it happens when I don't load the ski well in the fall line so I can release it across the hill. It's basically a response to a chicken move.

Got any suggestions?
post #19 of 27
Also, the first big leap is a video glitch. It never happened. Or it was just for fun. Or I lost my balance. Or it was just stupid. Or the dog ate my homework.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:
I probably went to short turns out of total fear. Or else, I wanted to show the group how to vary the radius.

As for the inside ski lift--....I do that often on my left side as my left leg is often really lazy/late into the turn.

In the last section there are some air spots. Sometimes, when I'm late releasing, I'll shoot the ski forward through the edge change. Otherwise it seems to get trapped on the edge and bogs down through the transition. It seems to happen on steep terrain when I hold the edge pressure too long for extra slowdown. I believe it happens when I don't load the ski well in the fall line so I can release it across the hill. It's basically a response to a chicken move.

Got any suggestions?
Man o man, Weems, you are sure tough on yourself. In any event, thanks for the self analysis. I am getting a lot of insight from it. I tend to have the same issues as you described, to a greater degree, of course.

Suggestions? Perhaps what you said earlier. Your self described style emphasises fluidity over power. Perhaps along with the mindset on fluidity, some of the aggressiveness is compromised. When that happens, the lazy side tends to be lazier and there is more of a tendency to be late. Perhaps think a little more aggressively and a little lighter on your feet?
post #21 of 27
Not too shabby for an old guy skiing on warm knives through butter.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:

As for the inside ski lift--I didn't see it on the video, because the version I have is really small. However, I do that often on my left side as my left leg is often really lazy/late into the turn.

In the last section there are some air spots. Sometimes, when I'm late releasing, I'll shoot the ski forward through the edge change. Otherwise it seems to get trapped on the edge and bogs down through the transition. It seems to happen on steep terrain when I hold the edge pressure too long for extra slowdown. I believe it happens when I don't load the ski well in the fall line so I can release it across the hill. It's basically a response to a chicken move.

Got any suggestions?
Sure, Can't say I'll be 100% accurate though. But if some of this rambling might help that's great. As always, discard if rubbish.

What I see is difficulty with the transition.

If the ski shoots forward, as you say happens, then you are back. Unweighting while back means the tips lift. Tip lifting is a clear sign you're not centered fore/aft over the skis.

Something to think about.... Ski the skis under your body, in control, and in contact with the snow. This means you cannot let the skis (feet) get ahead of your center of mass -- ever. It also means that your center of mass must be allowed to cross over your feet at transition and lead the way downhill. (Which could be where the "chicken" part comes in... )

In the third clip, it looks like the edging starts over the ski, but you rock back moving the pressure to the back of the ski ( Is this the loading you are talking about?).

There a moments when you can see the shoulders clearly behind the balls of the feet, above the heel. At this point, the skis have already moved ahead of you, and you need to do a funky move to get your center of mass to the inside: consequently the transition over the skis (neutral) takes place in the air. A strong neutral on the snow never gets established.

Suggest that as an exercise, you do the same runs, but don't pole. Keep both hands out and forwards dragging the poles so that the baskets are always ahead of the heel pieces. This will force you forwards, stop any rotation of the upper body that may be helping to put you back, and force you to keep the skis under you through neutral.

I know, two steps back, but it is entirely possible to load the ski so that it shoots under your body in the right direction, (which is what I think you are striving for), and not out ahead of you. You've got to be in the right position first to make it happen.

And as a last resort, especially helpful on the steeps, put a deep squat at the end of the turn, before initiating the next. As I was once told: "Squat hard! Like your gonna take a dump! ". Actually, they did not say "dump". [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

Guaranteed, the skis will be under you and solidly to boot! They just won't be rocketing under you enroute to the next turn.

Hope some of this helps!
post #23 of 27
Thanks, Josseph and Bonni and Big E. I'll try all that.

Big, I think I didn't explain my dilemma right, however, your pole drill will still work. When I say shoot the ski through the edge change, it's not that it's "happening", it's that I do it on purpose, because I need the ski to escape from the old turn. I've held the loading far to long, and the ski is losing its energy from the previous turn, so I have to launch it. It does momentarily leave me in the back seat, and I catch up to it pretty well. Actually, I think I do that whole recovery really well. It's kind of a steep retraction turn, and it's not a bad alternative. Also, when you make that many mistakes, you gotta be agile.

However, my goal, is to not have to artificially push it forward into the turn. If I get my max pressure higher in the turn, the ski will come across very smoothly in a progressive release, and I will be able to more easily move my hips forward with it. I don't do this too badly on bluer terrain, but I've got to log some more time in the steep to improve it there. So yeah, I'm striving for what you suggest. (And no, I ain't gonna squat. I hate that move.)

Also, Josseph, I'm not that tough on myself, but I sure love to get better. I know how good I am. But most important, I know how good I am not! The lifetime work of rebuilding and retuning every year has been the most important thrill of skiing. It's a new art, every season.
post #24 of 27
I have another small suggestion regarding your aforementioned tendency to lift the left ski.

In the third clip, check out how far back the left pole is allowed to travel as opposed to the right pole. It goes much farther back, so you are farther back than after a right turn.

The left ski rises, because the upper body gets over-rotated and back. This can happen when the emphasis is on smoothness, which sometimes translates into slowed exagerrated movements. So, when on your strong right leg, the turn ends up into an "opera singer" turn.

With the previously mentioned exercise in mind, after planting, which you do quite well, allow the pole to drag, but don't let it drag behind your heel. This'll keep you from over-rotating the upper body.
post #25 of 27
'kay. Thanks.
post #26 of 27
Hey, BigE.

You were absolutely right about my left pole. I discovered it kinesthetically in the last few days and realized, I was not pulling it out as I skied past it. Now I am. Big change on that side. I want a redo on the tape!

Thanks.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:
I want a redo on the tape!

Thanks.
I'd love to see the results!!!

And I'm very glad I could help. Cheers! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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