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Women's DH

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
OK, I'll kick it off again.
First off, congratulationns to all who medaled yesterday and those who participated. Well done!
Now on to the DH coverage. I had my hopes up that it would be better than the men's, and indeed it was going well. Then it turned into a crash-reel. Not what I came to the theater for.
So, Lindsey prevailed, took an interview with Brooker, then someone pointed out her husband. This is where it went to distasteful. Did they really need to leave the camera rolling during what was obviously a very emotional moment between a couple? Show the first hug and then leave them alone for cripes sakes!!!
Guess I'm just a complianer.
post #2 of 20
I thought the coverage was pretty good considering the time allotted.  I actually thought it was a tad better than the men's.  Of course when the gold goes to the US, they're going to allot a bit more time.  Let's face it; the network says, you have 22 minutes, that's it.  Fit in what you can.  So they show--
  • All four Americans.
  • A few of the top contenders outside the top Americans.
  • A few crashes
  • A few minutes of gushiness with the winner.
  • A bit of replay of some critical portions of the race.

I thought the tech analysis after the race, all 30-60 seconds of it, was actually pretty good.
post #3 of 20
NBC's going for that emotion.....I think they'd connect better with their potential audience if they called alpine skiing "NASCAR on snow"
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post

OK, I'll kick it off again.
First off, congratulationns to all who medaled yesterday and those who participated. Well done!
Now on to the DH coverage. I had my hopes up that it would be better than the men's, and indeed it was going well. Then it turned into a crash-reel. Not what I came to the theater for.
So, Lindsey prevailed, took an interview with Brooker, then someone pointed out her husband. This is where it went to distasteful. Did they really need to leave the camera rolling during what was obviously a very emotional moment between a couple? Show the first hug and then leave them alone for cripes sakes!!!
Guess I'm just a complianer.

I agree. Again, show more racers?, nah. try to turn it into a fairy-tale. I thought that was beyond personal space, even for a star. like the media version of ambulance chasing. why now? why such crap from NBC? How does this point in time turn into media's worst moment? They are actually changing the (appearance of) the nature of what happened to make up something to sell. very bad.

the drama is in the race already, the emotion is huge without embelishment. around the start haus, talking with coaches, bs ing among themselfves, and trying desperately to hang on to that rough course. wow.  
post #5 of 20
You know, I bet Lindsay doesn't have a problem with the cameras rolling. She's crying for joy with her husband after having won a gold medal in the Olympics. That's something 99.999999999999999999999999999% of people never get. Heck, I cried, too! -Not as hard, tho, just a tear or two-
post #6 of 20
I got the impression her husband was even wearing a mic - so at least he didn't mind.
post #7 of 20

NBC is doing the job the majority audience wants and the sponsors pay for.  Complaints coming from a fanatical albeit miniscule ski forum will never alter coverage the way we wish it to be.  Unfortunately for our higher expectations found here on epic...the coverage is exactly what the majority viewing public is expecting. 

And the sanctimonious 'stop the camera it’s a private moment' fails.  The live capture of the hug and share moments when Lindsey finds husband are absolutely fair game.  Hell, they both know that and understand they’ll eventually profit from such takes.  Its all good. 

Besides, it’s actually fun imagining how NBC is shaking in their boots for example during those moments where some utterance only a husband and wife would share might be broadcast to possibly offend viewers & sponsors.  Certainly brand Lindsey and hubby know this and I found them to be overly tame during that moment.   I’m also quite certain they understood their private suite was ready for whatever celebration they wanted.

It was fun however when NBC was caught airing some shitspeak between Shaun and his coach/posse up at the start gate prior to his last run with gold already in the bag.  Notwithstanding that SW’s brand is a bit different than LV’s, even with the analyst's apology it was beautiful to imagine the NBC exec’s uttering the same words in the control both at that very moment  

post #8 of 20
I didn't catch what White was saying but the announcer did apologize to the viewers. Did he drop the F bomb or something?

As far as the complaints about coverage, it happens during any Olympic year. Someone is always going to be ticked off because the coverage wasn't designed around the desires of a small minority of viewers who want to view the unedited and uncut versions of events, without any commentary or frills.
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

NBC is doing the job the majority audience wants and the sponsors pay for.  Complaints coming from a fanatical albeit miniscule ski forum will never alter coverage the way we wish it to be.  Unfortunately for our higher expectations found here on epic...the coverage is exactly what the majority viewing public is expecting. 

And the sanctimonious 'stop the camera it’s a private moment' fails.  The live capture of the hug and share moments when Lindsey finds husband are absolutely fair game.  Hell, they both know that and understand they’ll eventually profit from such takes.  Its all good. 

Besides, it’s actually fun imagining how NBC is shaking in their boots for example during those moments where some utterance only a husband and wife would share might be broadcast to possibly offend viewers & sponsors.  Certainly brand Lindsey and hubby know this and I found them to be overly tame during that moment.   I’m also quite certain they understood their private suite was ready for whatever celebration they wanted.

It was fun however when NBC was caught airing some shitspeak between Shaun and his coach/posse up at the start gate prior to his last run with gold already in the bag.  Notwithstanding that SW’s brand is a bit different than LV’s, even with the analyst's apology it was beautiful to imagine the NBC exec’s uttering the same words in the control both at that very moment  

 Sanctimonious??? Chill man, it's my opinion and calling me sanctimonious is uncalled for. I've always respected and valued your posts, you may want to do the same.
It's all good.
Edited by C.B. - 2/18/10 at 10:58am
post #10 of 20




Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post

It's all good.
 

 When you think comments on an open forum using an alias are directed at you personally...well...it’s time to step away from the screen, HTFU and get out and make some turns

post #11 of 20
So far, NBC has shown every moment, live, of the American men's four curling losses.  That's probably over eight hours of live coverage.  (Not including the women's team, either.)  I don't mind, I'm one of those weird ones that enjoy watching curling.  But compare that to the single hour, maybe less, of alpine skiing coverage so far.  By saying NBC are simply doing their job based on what the "average" American likes to watch - are you saying curling is eight or more times popular in America than skiing?  Somehow, I don't think so.  I'll reiterate what I said before - NBC are trying to cater to the popularity of skiing by showing it during prime time, but they're screwing up and just butchering the coverage instead.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

I didn't catch what White was saying but the announcer did apologize to the viewers. Did he drop the F bomb or something?

 

Reports from the affiliate here is that the bombs were caught and primarily fix for east and west coast feeds but untouched in our time zone…not sure about central…perhaps someone can chime in.  


Quote:
Originally Posted by Elistan View Post

So far, NBC has shown every moment, live, of the American men's four curling losses.  That's probably over eight hours of live coverage.  (Not including the women's team, either.)  I don't mind, I'm one of those weird ones that enjoy watching curling.  But compare that to the single hour, maybe less, of alpine skiing coverage so far.  By saying NBC are simply doing their job based on what the "average" American likes to watch - are you saying curling is eight or more times popular in America than skiing?  Somehow, I don't think so.  I'll reiterate what I said before - NBC are trying to cater to the popularity of skiing by showing it during prime time, but they're screwing up and just butchering the coverage instead.
 

I read you but total curling hours or whatever event duration shown outside of prime time is irrelevant.  Add a paradigm consideration that it’s not what we'd like to watch rather it’s what we’d pay to watch.   With that the most popular athletes/events will not be drawn out or watered down but rather crushed into the most valued prime time slot and held under tight control.  Just view some of the other hundred thousand threads’s discussing NBC’s iron curtain approach with alternative web feeds off prime.  Sucks. Compounding our angst regarding lack of truly thorough coverage you have situations such as LV and SW in the same prime slot…well…that’s just going to be a hatchet job.  Unfortunately yes, NBC is doing the job as their model dictates...and don't hold our collective breath to see change anytime soon…my 2 pennies.  And it still sucks.

post #13 of 20
It was something like: I can't f'ing ride right now. he was all elated, had already won, and was asking his coach what to do.
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post




 When you think comments on an open forum using an alias are directed at you personally...well...it’s time to step away from the screen, HTFU and get out and make some turns

OK, I'll do that. Olive branch offered.
CB
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

NBC is doing the job the majority audience wants and the sponsors pay for.  Complaints coming from a fanatical albeit miniscule ski forum will never alter coverage the way we wish it to be.  Unfortunately for our higher expectations found here on epic...the coverage is exactly what the majority viewing public is expecting. 

There's actually no basis at all for saying that's what the public wants. It's what NBC has decided the public wants. There's not much choice. Sponsors want viewers, that's what they pay for. What your saying is that this is the only way that NBC can maximize viewers.

It's not just this group here that's complaining btw. Lot's of people are pissed and disgusted at the coverage and the constant focus on Americans. That's not a new complaint at all, but it's worse than ever. I was talking to someone  that was annoyed actually at the downhill coverage. Even knowing nothing, they could tell it was focused on only the Americans. When I told her that there were actually 45 people in the race she was shocked. She was thinking 15 max.

NBC is trashing an international sporting event. We get that primetime will always be edited and controlled, but this is terrible. This is their model of what they think they need to do. It's their programming of entertainment, we understand. The thing is NBC's entertainment division has been amongst the worst for years.That division is "doing the job the public wants" and sponsors will pay for- that's the point of it. That's failing though and so is this.

So much for "doing the job the public wants". It's not working on their shows and they're holding the Olympics hostage with their already proven unsuccessful model in the entertainment world.
post #16 of 20
I'd bet that NBC has piles of expensive research that tells the what the public wants.  The problem with that is that the public can respond to surveys but they can't really tell you what the want.  You have to know our business, your audience, your potential audience and your event/sport better than the public and have the sense, courage and innovative brainpower to give the public something that is way beyond anything that the public thinks they want.  Something that will wow them.  The other problem is that no one at NBC really knows or understands ski racing and they are unwilling to take the time to figure out how to best present it.  Picking up the feed and having a couple of people doing voice overs after the fact is not the answer.  No one has ever covered ski racing effectively from a visual or technical standpoint and no one has ever been an effective announcer.  They all end up trying to do some version of Bob Beattie's half intelligible screaming while Franz Klammer put down his memorable run at Innsbruck almost 4 decades ago.  It's sad that the presentation of the sport on TV won't get any better.  There has never been a compelling ski announcer that people know, trust and look forward to hearing.  No skiing equivalent of John Madden.  Properly presented skiing has all the elements of a great sporting event: personalities, sublime skiing, high risk, frequent crashes, a scenic setting, high tech gear, all of which can be combined to show the skill of the competitors and drama of the event.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

…not sure about central…perhaps someone can chime in.  

We got the bomb dropped on us, more like a Bunker Buster.

Do they not know they're on international T.V.?

BTW, anyone up there wanna tell the snowboard team to pull their pants up, they really do look stupid.
post #18 of 20


Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas View Post

I'd bet that NBC has piles of expensive research that tells the what the public wants.  The problem with that is that the public can respond to surveys but they can't really tell you what the want.  You have to know our business, your audience, your potential audience and your event/sport better than the public and have the sense, courage and innovative brainpower to give the public something that is way beyond anything that the public thinks they want.  Something that will wow them.  The other problem is that no one at NBC really knows or understands ski racing and they are unwilling to take the time to figure out how to best present it.  Picking up the feed and having a couple of people doing voice overs after the fact is not the answer.  No one has ever covered ski racing effectively from a visual or technical standpoint and no one has ever been an effective announcer.  They all end up trying to do some version of Bob Beattie's half intelligible screaming while Franz Klammer put down his memorable run at Innsbruck almost 4 decades ago.  It's sad that the presentation of the sport on TV won't get any better.  There has never been a compelling ski announcer that people know, trust and look forward to hearing.  No skiing equivalent of John Madden.  Properly presented skiing has all the elements of a great sporting event: personalities, sublime skiing, high risk, frequent crashes, a scenic setting, high tech gear, all of which can be combined to show the skill of the competitors and drama of the event.

Well articulated!  I find with all the Epic thread starts and posts related to this topic you moved best over the obvious emotional surface issues regarding NBC's coverage toward the constructive considerations of what questions were asked and how conclusions are drawn vis-à-vis a viewer's framework & perspectives. 

Certainly naïve is thinking there is absolutely no basis in NBC’s approach of getting the job done in light of their investments made in years of research and discovery to play in a multi-billion dollar enterprise.  Quite the contrary as they would have every base covered if you entered the boardroom asking for immediate justification regarding their broadcasting methods.  Of course we all understand; figures don’t lie, but liars figure  

Nevertheless, thanks for your post as it will help me immediately move off this subject into a more positive mind so I can better enjoy the remaining events.  I’ll make the best of what we’re given, cheer for the team and start my letter writing campaign to NBC once the torch is snuffed out



post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas View Post

I'd bet that NBC has piles of expensive research that tells the what the public wants.  The problem with that is that the public can respond to surveys but they can't really tell you what the want.  You have to know our business, your audience, your potential audience and your event/sport better than the public and have the sense, courage and innovative brainpower to give the public something that is way beyond anything that the public thinks they want.  Something that will wow them. 

The other problem is that no one at NBC really knows or understands ski racing and they are unwilling to take the time to figure out how to best present it.  Picking up the feed and having a couple of people doing voice overs after the fact is not the answer.  No one has ever covered ski racing effectively from a visual or technical standpoint and no one has ever been an effective announcer.  They all end up trying to do some version of Bob Beattie's half intelligible screaming while Franz Klammer put down his memorable run at Innsbruck almost 4 decades ago. 

It's sad that the presentation of the sport on TV won't get any better.  There has never been a compelling ski announcer that people know, trust and look forward to hearing.  No skiing equivalent of John Madden.  Properly presented skiing has all the elements of a great sporting event: personalities, sublime skiing, high risk, frequent crashes, a scenic setting, high tech gear, all of which can be combined to show the skill of the competitors and drama of the event.
Yes, nice post choucas!
The frustrating thing is that NBC is not using the resources they do have to create a presentation of ski racing that is compelling. They have a good announcer in Tim Ryan. Christin Cooper tends to talk over the action but she could be trained. They have Picabo Street also doing commentary on the Today show. She could be brought in. They have the technology in their filming equipment. They could even expand it by using the cable cam or the camera on rails they use for speed skating and moguls.

None of that matters though. They've made the decision that it's not compelling and they're not going to show it. Maybe it's because of Torino and Bode, but that's completely of their own making. They continually build things up around individuals instead of events. Individuals are so built up that the event becomes theirs to loose in people's eyes. If they don't win, then it's a failure. Who want's to watch failure and disappointment?

I like your statement that they need to
"have the sense, courage and innovative brainpower to give the public something that is way beyond anything that the public thinks they want.  Something that will wow them." - choucas
This is what we need but probably won't get.
Are things working? Is viewership what it should be? Here's USA Today:
"Time is right to whet appetites with live Olympics"
 By Michael Hiestand, USA TODAY  2/18/10

But NBC's Vancouver prime-time average — 14.9% of U.S. households — is up 19% from its 2006 Torino Games. But it is also down 24% from its 2002Salt Lake Winter Games and down 9% from CBS' 1998 Nagano Winter Games, which posed time-zone challenges.

With Olympic TV, it's time to bend a little in going live.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/columnist/hiestand-tv/2010-02-18-olympics-nbc-live-coverage_N.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UsatodaycomSports-Hiestand+%28Sports+-+Hiestand%29
Maybe not so much.
Chopping events up and focusing on individuals, especially US athletes, takes the drama out of the Olympics as a sporting event. In ski racing there are probably almost always 10 people capable of winning and sometimes a big surprise. If NBC would accept that you could make a very compelling event using the resources they already have on the ground.

If you think all these decision get made very scientifically, have a look at the Jeff Zucker interview with Charlie Rose. Zucker is head of NBC/Universal.
http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10824

It's about the Leno-O'Brien situation. Jan. 2010 30 min.


post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

The frustrating thing is that NBC is not using the resources they do have to create a presentation of ski racing that is compelling.

 

Spot on!  It’s within their reach…at minimum this could have been one thing done well.    

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